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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2020

Jessica Zeiss and Joseph Chapman

The purpose of this study is to collect data that allows researchers to capture both affective and cognitive buy-in influenced by both product and product strategy targets.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to collect data that allows researchers to capture both affective and cognitive buy-in influenced by both product and product strategy targets.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysis of 13 salesperson interviews followed the cluster and axial coding of grounded theory interview protocol.

Findings

This study finds two types of buy-in that are uniquely contingent on the target, and for which are influenced by both cognitive and affective states of being. Additionally, it finds that either affective or cognitive states of being can both drive and inhibit salesperson buy-in of either target. While the targets of buy-in appear to be mutually exclusive, the cognitive nature of disconfirming evidence appears to directly inhibit both targets of buy-in while also resulting in negative affect.

Research limitations/implications

Further study that uncovers the causal role of an affective state inhibiting buy-in after the introduction of disconfirming evidence is warranted.

Practical implications

Managerial training and messaging approaches for achieving the two buy-in targets will likely differ or focus on only one type for efficient training.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine the simultaneous effects of the two underlying states of cognition and affect on buy-in development. It is found that the two states can influence each other to stunt buy-in. The present study contributes to sales behavior literature by allowing the possibility of a sequence of states that stunt buy-in, positioning simultaneous examination is vital to the conceptualization of buy-in.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Timothy M. Schlak

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of social capital to the literature on academic libraries as it pertains to leadership and management as well as to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of social capital to the literature on academic libraries as it pertains to leadership and management as well as to demonstrate the limitations that the current discursive use of the phrase “buy in” represents.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper brings critical insights from outside fields of intellectual inquiry, including business, knowledge management, computer and information systems, and sociology. The paper is organized around a series of questions posed at the end of the introduction and serves to introduce its audience to the key findings made in these fields as well as to apply relevant observations about social capital to the unique context of leadership and management in academic libraries.

Findings

The paper elucidates a number of limitations to the current practice of using the phrase “buy in” as a way of exploring the concept of social capital. The most significant risk that the phrase’s use incurs is a lack of context and clarity around critical concepts of leadership, including trust, trustworthiness, and shared vision and meaning.

Originality/value

This paper argues that a broader contextualization of “buy in” in the scholarship on social capital can lead to a richer dialog that allows academic library administrators to understand the concurrent and competing factors that accompany an exchange where “buy in” is given or withheld.

Details

Library Management, vol. 36 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2018

Junna Meng, Jinghong Yan, Bin Xue, Jing Fu and Ning He

The goal of making buy-in decisions is to purchase materials at the right time with the required quantity and a minimum material cost (MC). To help achieve this goal, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of making buy-in decisions is to purchase materials at the right time with the required quantity and a minimum material cost (MC). To help achieve this goal, the purpose of this paper is to find a way of optimizing the buy-in decision with the consideration of flexible starting date of non-critical activities which makes daily demand adjustable.

Design/methodology/approach

First, a specific algorithm is developed to calculate a series of demand combinations modeling daily material demand for all the possible start dates. Second, future material prices are predicted by applying artificial neural network. Third, the demand combinations and predicted prices are used to generate an optimal buy-in decision.

Findings

By comparing MC in situation when non-critical activities always start at the earliest date to that in situations when the starting date is flexible, it is found that making material buy-in decision with the consideration of the flexibility usually helps reduce MC.

Originality/value

In this paper, a material buy-in decision-making method that accounts non-critical activities’ flexible starting date is proposed. A ternary cycle algorithm is developed to calculate demand combinations. The results that making material buy-in decision considering non-critical activities’ flexible starting date can reduce MC in most times indicates that contractors may consider non-critical activities’ flexibility a part of the buy-in decision-making process, so as to achieve an MC decrease and profit increase.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Mike Wright, Ken Robbie and Mark Albrighton

This paper provides an exploratory examination of the growing phenomenon of secondary management buy‐outs and buy‐ins, where an enterprise having initially been bought out…

1491

Abstract

This paper provides an exploratory examination of the growing phenomenon of secondary management buy‐outs and buy‐ins, where an enterprise having initially been bought out by management is later the subject of a second buy‐out or buy‐in. Such transactions provide a further dimension to the exit opportunities available to venture capital investors and also to the maintenance of independent entrepreneurial businesses. The paper uses large scale data to test propositions relating to the expected differences between secondary buy‐outs and buy‐ins and buy‐outs and buy‐ins in general as well as detailed case study evidence from entrepreneurs and venture capitalists to examine the rationale for such transactions. The quantitative data suggest that secondary buy‐outs and buy‐ins are more likely to involve enterprises in traditional industrial sectors and are significantly more likely to occur a longer time after the initial buy‐out than are trade sales or flotations. The case study evidence reveals that secondary buy‐outs and buy‐ins can arise for various reasons but are rarely the first choice exit route for venture capitalists, though they provide a means by which entrepreneurs can maintain the enterprise’s independent private existence.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 July 2007

Stephen Bowles, Christopher J.L. Cunningham, Gabriel M. De La Rosa and James Picano

This article aims to test the effectiveness of coaching for middle and executive level managers within a large recruiting organization.

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Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to test the effectiveness of coaching for middle and executive level managers within a large recruiting organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants set goals to achieve during a 12‐month coaching programme. The sample consisted of middle managers (n=30) and executive managers (n=29) involved in US Army recruiting. Outcomes included measures of coached participants' achievement of quota and personal goals, and assessment on nine leader competencies and buy‐in over the one‐year coaching period.

Findings

Coached managers outperformed un‐coached, but experienced/incumbent counterparts. The strongest impact of coaching on performance was for middle managers and their subordinates (as opposed to executive managers). Both groups of participants demonstrated growth on some dimensions of recruiter‐leader competencies and achievement of self‐set goals.

Research limitations/implications

A small and nontraditional sample of military recruiters was used. Future researchers can build on the approach outlined here to more concretely evaluate the impact of their coaching efforts in other populations.

Practical implications

Coaching all recruiter managers could translate into a return on investment of several thousand additional recruits. In addition, the achievement of personally relevant goals with the help of coaching, the development of leader competencies indicates real benefit associated with this form of goal‐based coaching.

Originality/value

We offer one of the first empirical evaluations of the effectiveness of a goal‐based leader coaching intervention. Practitioners and researchers can benefit from this approach by using it to improve coaching effectiveness and demonstrate value to the clients they serve.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Shang Chen, Qingfei Min and Xuefei Xu

As social commerce migrates to the mobile platform, mobile social commerce (ms–commerce), an emerging way of conducting social commerce in the mobile environment, is…

Abstract

Purpose

As social commerce migrates to the mobile platform, mobile social commerce (ms–commerce), an emerging way of conducting social commerce in the mobile environment, is gaining popularity among mobile users. Although impulse buying in social commerce has been the focus of scholars in recent years, individuals' impulse-buying behavior in ms–commerce has not been highlighted and therefore is worth investigating. This study addressed that gap by differentiating and monitoring the impacts that three key targets of social identification in ms–commerce exerted on impulse buying. Furthermore, previous studies had highlighted the importance of culture in impulse buying in other contexts, so the authors examined how the effects of the key identification targets differed across cultures, as a result of cultural diversity among the ms–commerce users. Finally, the authors drew upon the lens of information technology (IT) affordances to explore how different combinations of ms–commerce affordances influenced each target of identification.

Design/methodology/approach

This research first applied a qualitative methodology by using semi-structured interviews with 27 ms–commerce users to extract the relevant subdimensions of IT affordances in ms–commerce. Then, the authors tested their hypotheses with survey data collected from the United States and China.

Findings

The results clearly illustrate that three key targets of social identification had varying impacts on impulse buying in different cultural dimensions. In addition, nearly all of the proposed IT affordances in ms–commerce aided users in building multiple identifications, to various degrees.

Originality/value

This study extends social commerce research by examining the important role that social identification plays in impulse buying in the mobile environment. Moreover, unlike previous studies that mainly had focused on ordinary buying in social commerce across cultures, this study investigated the relative importance of the targets of social identification on impulse buying in different espoused cultural dimensions. Importantly, the authors used a technology affordance lens to also uncover the context-specific stimulators of separate identification targets, thus going beyond the existing body of knowledge that focused on general beliefs.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 121 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2000

Kevin Thomson and Lorrie Hecker

It takes more to succeed in today’s global marketplace. More responsiveness. More flexibility. More commitment. To compete, organisations need their staff to understand…

7493

Abstract

It takes more to succeed in today’s global marketplace. More responsiveness. More flexibility. More commitment. To compete, organisations need their staff to understand business goals and brand values and feel personally committed to their achievement. To flourish, they need their people to act as champions of their business and their brand, both internally and with customers and other external stakeholders. Many businesses realise this and have started talking about staff “buy‐in”. Yet they have failed to achieve the results they need. This paper explores what staff buy‐in really means and how it ultimately affects customers, using the findings of two major surveys commissioned by MCA and conducted by MORI. It also looks at the managerial implications of new approaches to employee communication and internal marketing and the potential impact on business performance.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2009

Michael Y. Moon

The concept of common sense has not received much attention in the organization literature. In this paper, I propose a model that links a change agent's self‐awareness and…

4015

Abstract

Purpose

The concept of common sense has not received much attention in the organization literature. In this paper, I propose a model that links a change agent's self‐awareness and reflexivity, his or her sensemaking of common sense perspectives related to planned change, and buy‐in among organization stakeholders. The case is made for change agents to pay close attention to common sense perspectives because they can become the basis for particular problematic ambivalence and diminished change buy‐in among stakeholders in the organization. This paper aims to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptual and theoretical rationales for the model are offered. Examples from the psychological and organizational theory literatures provide support for the various elements of the model.

Findings

Common sense perspectives should be factored into the diagnosis of the organization. Self‐awareness, reflexivity, and sensemaking are all forms of social awareness that are necessary to engage stakeholders on matters of common sense.

Research implications

Four research areas are identified. First, social and cultural contextual influences on common sense require clarification. Second, if resistance is multidimensional, how are dimensions influenced by common sense? Third, what group level of the organization (e.g., individual, group, organization) do common sense perspectives represent? Fourth, how may change agents work out incommensurate common sense perspectives?

Practical implications

Common sense cannot be mandated. Change agents must maintain self‐awareness and reflexivity as they work with stakeholders in a sensemaking process. Increased buy‐in emerges through minimizing ambivalence towards change.

Originality/value

Little, if anything, has been written on the use of common sense in organizational change management.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Susan Goodwin

The purpose of this article is two‐fold: to provide guidance on how to present persuasive web site redesign presentations to library stakeholders; and to introduce screen…

1362

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is two‐fold: to provide guidance on how to present persuasive web site redesign presentations to library stakeholders; and to introduce screen capture software as an effective and persuasive tool for usability studies to both record data and promote redesign recommendations to library stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

Includes a review of the literature summarizing effective techniques used to create persuasive presentations and recounts how Camtasia Studio, Techsmith's screen capture software, was employed by the Usability Committee at Texas A&M University Libraries to record usability tests and present the committee's redesign recommendations to library administration and staff.

Findings

Screen capture software in conjunction with effective presentations can have a positive impact on library‐wide buy‐in for web site redesign initiatives.

Originality/value

Will be of interest to usability committees who want to streamline data recording and distribution techniques, as well as provide colleagues with a more compelling “data‐rich” option for the presentation of findings.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

George K. Chacko

Gives an in depth view of the strategies pursued by the world’s leading chief executive officers in an attempt to provide guidance to new chief executives of today…

9119

Abstract

Gives an in depth view of the strategies pursued by the world’s leading chief executive officers in an attempt to provide guidance to new chief executives of today. Considers the marketing strategies employed, together with the organizational structures used and looks at the universal concepts that can be applied to any product. Uses anecdotal evidence to formulate a number of theories which can be used to compare your company with the best in the world. Presents initial survival strategies and then looks at ways companies can broaden their boundaries through manipulation and choice. Covers a huge variety of case studies and examples together with a substantial question and answer section.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 11 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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