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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2016

Vladyslav Biloshapka, Oleksiy Osiyevskyy and Marc Meyer

Good companies innovate. In the process, they consider target markets, target customers, new product or service offerings, and the positioning of these relative to…

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1944

Abstract

Purpose

Good companies innovate. In the process, they consider target markets, target customers, new product or service offerings, and the positioning of these relative to competitors. This forms a basic strategy for the innovation. However, the lesson of competitive dynamics today is that innovation effort stops short of its ultimate potential if it does not also embrace the business model possibilities provided by the innovation itself. This short article provides a strategic lens for considering the efficacy and power of a business model for a product or service innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The current paper is grounded in the empirical results of an ongoing longitudinal study (undertaken by the authors team in the U.S., Canada and Ukraine) aimed at exploring the structure, characteristics, evolution, and performance outcomes of organizational business models.

Findings

The business model’s key characteristics are customer value (the “effectiveness side” of the equation, i.e., doing right things for customers that the latters are ready to appreciate and pay for, but not always to the focal firm) and business value (the “efficiency side” of the equation, reflecting translation of the customer value into profit). Importantly, our evidence strongly reveals the dynamic nature of the business model construct, implying that the companies evolve in terms of these two dimensions.

Practical implications

The recommendations part of the article is primarily based on the in-depth analysis of the recent history of large companies that were struggling to: sustain customer value, and develop and apply internal product and production platforms to increase operating efficiency, and hence business value. All these firms had either slipped into or were in the danger of slipping into Impostor status, and were seeking ways to regain and sustain their Innovation advantage, often over newer entrants in their respective industries.

Originality/value

Introduction of the Business Model Value Matrix allowing to analyze the current company’s business model; practical recommendations regarding getting to and remaining in the Winner quadrant

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Margaret D. Nowicki, Eric E. Lewis and Jeffrey W. Lippitt

There is a tremendous need for the valuation of small businesses. Oftentimes, small businessowners do not have the wherewithal to gather the data and keep it up to date…

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1824

Abstract

There is a tremendous need for the valuation of small businesses. Oftentimes, small businessowners do not have the wherewithal to gather the data and keep it up to date for use in situations that require valuation. Formal valuations are necessary because they provide objective evidence of value, in contrast to value set by markets on which public companies are traded. This article focuses on some factors that impact the valuation of the business and will help small businessowners feel more comfortable talking with financial professionals about how the business might be valued.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2008

Charles Holme

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview for senior managers of the strategic importance of ethical values in organisations working in the profit‐making and

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18765

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview for senior managers of the strategic importance of ethical values in organisations working in the profit‐making and not‐for‐profit sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines the principles involved and contrasts them with examples of unethical behaviour in the news at present. The paper presents the practical application of ethical business values through case studies from different organisations where ethical values are part of a positive strategy to achieve competitive advantage. There is an analysis of the case against and for ethical values, a discussion of how business ethics can be part of an organisation's strategy, the evidence that non‐executive directors and others may find of ethical behaviour in business decisions, a discussion of ethics in an international context and a short checklist of questions to provide readers with a guide to the “ethical health” of the organisation.

Findings

The arguments in favour of defining ethical values within business are persuasive.

Practical implications

There are examples from experience together with clear guidance about how to manage ethical values in business. Readers could start with the ethical health checklist of questions, decide how their ethical values statement, if any, compares with the examples in the papers, conduct an audit of an existing ethical strategy to identify if their values statement is being translated into behaviours throughout the organization, and test the impact of the ethical values strategy on the competitive position of the business.

Originality/value

The paper is educational and therefore provides value to senior managers and directors in a concise but comprehensive overview of the topic that is of current concern in the business world. It points to practical actions they can take in this respect. It could be a thought starter to managers discussing the topic at an away day for example, or for strategic leaders to discuss how to use ethical values to develop a competitive position.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Book part
Publication date: 14 September 2020

Virginia Munro

A full and adequate Systematic Quantitative Literature Research Analysis of the academic literature and research on creating shared value (CSV) is long overdue. This…

Abstract

A full and adequate Systematic Quantitative Literature Research Analysis of the academic literature and research on creating shared value (CSV) is long overdue. This chapter commences this process by introducing some of the academic literature currently on CSV and examining the strengths and weaknesses of this literature, while identifying gaps for future research. The chapter builds on current academic literature to include writing and research from the business community in an attempt to make this chapter both topical and accessible to anyone interested in CSV, including practitioners interested in implementing these types of projects as direct CSV projects or as part of already existing CSR strategy. It is expected that the inclusion of this type of business literature will add value to academic research going forward. The Appendix brings the chapter together by presenting examples of a variety of CSV case studies to provide ideas for future project implementation and opportunities for future research in both implementation and measurement.

Details

CSR for Purpose, Shared Value and Deep Transformation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-035-8

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Abstract

Details

Evaluating Companies for Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-622-4

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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2020

Md. Jahir Uddin Palas and Raluca Bunduchi

Drawing broadly from the technology frame (Davidson, 2002) and organizing vision perspectives (Swanson and Ramiller, 1997) which consider the business value of information…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing broadly from the technology frame (Davidson, 2002) and organizing vision perspectives (Swanson and Ramiller, 1997) which consider the business value of information technology as resulting from actors' efforts to make sense of new technology, the study applies Ojala's (2016) business model framework to examine how different sets of actors understand the value of blockchain within the healthcare sector.

Design/methodology/approach

To include the perspective of different sets of actors, the research combines a systematic literature review to capture academic research, semi-structured interviews with blockchain experts, with an analysis of blockchain healthcare vendors.

Findings

The study finds a high degree of congruence between the perspective of different actors, with key sources of blockchain value concentrated around value proposition, particularly enhancing privacy and security; value capture, specifically cost savings, and value network, mostly enhancing data accessibility and reducing intermediation. Value delivery is the least emphasized value creation mechanism and concerns primarily improvements in supply chain transparency. Minor variations between actors' interpretations of value exist, mostly around the contribution of blockchain to support the value proposition and include the provision of social value, the creation of trust, supporting automation and improving employment.

Originality/value

Recognizing that the value of new technology is as much the result of actors' interpretations, as the objective outcome of its deployment, this study takes a multi-stakeholder perspective to examine blockchain's business value and highlights new aspects of value associated with blockchain deployments. The findings include a value outcome framework that allows systematic comparisons between blockchain implementations across contexts.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Annie Green

This paper proposes a logical approach to valuing knowledge within the context of the business enterprise.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper proposes a logical approach to valuing knowledge within the context of the business enterprise.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology or approach to knowledge valuation is derived from empirical research based on a framework of intangible valuation areas (FIVA). The key valuation components of FIVA are used as the basis for the evolution of an enterprise knowledge valuation system (KVS).

Findings

A conceptual model provides the foundation a business needs to construct a KVS that aligns with business performance. This aids businesses in modeling their business intelligence and identifying intelligent behavior that significantly contributes to the decision‐making process of stakeholders in today's business enterprises.

Originality/value

Businesses enterprises are challenged with the development and use of knowledge within the business to positively affect the performance and market valuation of a business enterprise. The conceptual model presented in this paper expands on existing components of intangible asset and value chain models to aid business stakeholders in a method that organizes and structures enterprise knowledge such that they understand what their enterprise knowledge is and the value of their enterprise knowledge.

Details

VINE, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2009

Tony Hooper and Marta Vos

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which New Zealand business web sites conform to the provisions of the New Zealand Privacy Act, 1993 as an…

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1372

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which New Zealand business web sites conform to the provisions of the New Zealand Privacy Act, 1993 as an articulation of the national values on the rights of individuals to information privacy. The secondary aim is to assess whether adherence to these values might be used as criteria that can reflect on the business integrity of the web site sponsor.

Design/methodology/approach

The privacy notices and information‐handling practices of New Zealand business web sites were analysed using a content analysis methodology. The analysis was carried out on a sample of 200 companies, selected at random from a published list of the top 800 companies in New Zealand in 2005. Government web sites were excluded.

Findings

The first research hypothesis – that New Zealand business web sites demonstrate awareness of the privacy concerns of customers by posting a privacy notice – was not supported. Similarly, the privacy notices on New Zealand business web sites did not reflect the principles of the New Zealand Privacy Act, 1993 as a basis for establishing “value congruence” with customers. Consequently the use of the principles of the Privacy Act to assess business integrity was not demonstrated sufficiently by the investigation.

Practical implications

The lack of a usable convention for evaluating privacy notices on New Zealand business web sites may lead to a loss of value congruence between businesses and their customers, leading to less‐than‐optimal commercial transactions. The principles of the New Zealand Privacy Act 1993 define the national values and privacy rights of online customers. The use of the Privacy Act to assess the information handling practices of New Zealand businesses online could ensure more ethical business practice, demonstrate business integrity and promote customer confidence.

Originality/value

The use of legislated privacy principles as a reflection of established national values on the rights of citizens could provide a useful measure of value congruence and possibly business integrity. The variety of privacy legislation worldwide reflects a global lack of agreement on acceptable principles. Nevertheless, businesses wishing to establish their integrity and value congruence would be advised to ensure that their web sites provide for the growing sensitivity to privacy issues and the way that personal information is gathered and used online.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Patrick McAllister

This paper explores the conceptual and methodological issues relating to the valuation and appraisal of commercial properties where revenue generated by the provision of…

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2880

Abstract

This paper explores the conceptual and methodological issues relating to the valuation and appraisal of commercial properties where revenue generated by the provision of additional services constitutes a significant proportion of the total income flow. The paper focuses on two main areas. First, the valuation and development of the serviced office model is discussed. Second, the implications of the growing interest of landlords in acting as access managers and suppliers to their tenants are considered. The US debate on business enterprise value and hotel appraisal is reviewed. It is concluded serviced offices owner occupiers have two main assets – the tangible property asset and intangible business asset(s) – which are symbiotically linked but separable. In order to appraise these interests valuers need to be able to value businesses and property since the income flows derived from service provision will have different drivers and risk profiles than pure property‐derived income flows.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Morteza Ghobakhloo, Mohammad Sadegh Sabouri, Tang Sai Hong and Khosro Amirizadeh

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a model to analyze the relationships between three aspects of technical electronic commerce (EC)‐based information system…

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1176

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a model to analyze the relationships between three aspects of technical electronic commerce (EC)‐based information system (IS) resources; the supply chain process integration; and business value.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is consistent with the perspective on IS‐enabled organizational capabilities and resource based view of the firm. A questionnaire‐based survey was conducted to collect data from 214 supply chain, logistics, or procurement/purchasing managers of leading manufacturing firms.

Findings

The findings suggest that supply chain process integration, a key EC‐enabled organizational capability, can enhance business value. We found that this capability serve as a catalyst in transforming technical EC‐based IS resources (technical quality of EC applications, EC advancements, and EC alignment) into higher value for a firm.

Research limitations/implications

Among other limitations, this paper does not address human IS resources as the other potential determinants of firm's supply chain capabilities. Moreover, this study relies on cross‐sectional data.

Practical implications

The results suggest that supply chain process integration is an important intermediate organizational capability through which value of EC‐based IS resources can be materialized. The technical aspects of EC‐based IS resources need to be developed to effectively form supply chain capabilities.

Originality/value

The paper is perhaps one of the first to show theoretically and empirically how firms, in particular in developing countries, can generate business value from EC‐enabled supply chain process integration; also it broadens the scope of EC alignment in relation to process integration and business value to the entire supply chain.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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