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Book part
Publication date: 12 October 2018

Ruiyu Feng, Yao-Chin Wang and Bill Ryan

This chapter conceptualizes a framework that can be applied to examine the service experiences of business tourists at luxury hotels. A synthesized literature review…

Abstract

This chapter conceptualizes a framework that can be applied to examine the service experiences of business tourists at luxury hotels. A synthesized literature review results in the identification of three service constructs − surprise, recovery, and sweetness − that constitute the service experiences. In the development of five propositions and in views of emotional appreciation and reciprocity, the chapter posits that emotional value from these three constructs of service experiences can enhance business tourists’ attitude of gratitude and consequently their willingness to pay a price premium. The proposed conceptual framework extends the three service constructs to, and integrates them with, a value–attitude–behavior model.

Details

Quality Services and Experiences in Hospitality and Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-384-1

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Book part
Publication date: 28 December 2016

Magdalena Petronella (Nellie) Swart

The relevance of the use of business models in the measurement of tourist experience has been questioned. Therefore, the purpose of this chapter is to suggest a…

Abstract

Purpose

The relevance of the use of business models in the measurement of tourist experience has been questioned. Therefore, the purpose of this chapter is to suggest a theoretical framework for the development of a multi-item Business Tourist Experience Value Model.

Methodology/approach

Against the Behavioural Intentions Model of Fishbein and Ajzen (1975), an alternative Business Tourist Experience Value theoretical model is suggested. This model consists of an integration and re-assessment of different elements from a range of empirical studies.

Findings

Experiential value, satisfaction, and post-consumption behavior may play an important role in acquiring information and knowledge creation on how business tourism organizations can use a Business Tourist Experience Value model to enhance service experiences.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the explorative nature of the Business Tourist Experience Value theoretical model, more empirical studies are needed to investigate, test and validate the model.

Practical implications

Results from the theoretical discussion support the inclusion of experiential value, satisfaction, and post-consumption behavior as part of the Business Tourist Experience Value model. Due to the magnitude of the relationships among these dimensions it is expected that the theoretical and practical implications may complement each other. Therefore business tourism managers can use these dimensions as guidelines on how to create valuable experiences for their tourists and perform better.

Originality/value

This theoretical model offers new practices into business tourism managers’ measurement of experiential value, satisfaction, and post-consumption behavior in a business tourism context.

Details

The Handbook of Managing and Marketing Tourism Experiences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-289-7

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Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2018

Magdalena Petronella (Nellie) Swart

Tourism is a service-intensive industry where tourists’ experiences are framed by the quality of service provided. The main aim of this chapter is to offer conceptual…

Abstract

Purpose

Tourism is a service-intensive industry where tourists’ experiences are framed by the quality of service provided. The main aim of this chapter is to offer conceptual guidelines on the service quality expectations and experiences of tourists and how this can be maintained through customer care.

Methodological approach

A literature review was conducted where theories relevant to service quality and customer care were explored to design conceptual frameworks and guidelines for small business entrepreneurs/managers.

Findings

Psychological aspects related to the delivery of quality service are influenced by an array of characteristics, variables and managerial perspectives. Furthermore, tourists value the same service quality variables in the service quality assessment of their expectations and experiences.

Research limitations

Due to the exploratory nature of this chapter, interpretation of the findings must be done in the context of the discussed literature review with practical examples.

Practical implications

Service quality and customer care are essential elements in meeting tourists’ expectations. The five-step approach to address the service quality gaps in a tourism business provides valuable guidelines in the inter-relationships between the various aspects related to service delivery. The delivery of quality service is maintained by the creation of good relationships through customer care.

Originality/value

The illustration of the inter-relationships between analytical frameworks and models provides a unique opportunity for small business entrepreneurs to create an awareness of the delivery of quality service and customer care.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Entrepreneurship in Tourism, Travel and Hospitality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-529-2

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2020

Francisco Javier Ballina

Smart tourism (ST) needs the development of smart business. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the future of the smart component of tourism companies, what their…

Abstract

Purpose

Smart tourism (ST) needs the development of smart business. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the future of the smart component of tourism companies, what their perspectives are and what factors can help to accelerate it.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 133 managers of tourist companies is the basis of the empirical information. The study was a personal survey carried out during FITUR 2019 International Tourism Fair of Madrid. The main element of the study is the future development of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and smart tourism (ST) in business.

Findings

The results indicate that there is little development at present of the smart business eco-system and that development will continue to be slow in the future. Moreover, this is not a critical issue in the agendas of companies. It was found that tourists pressure tourism through the extensive use of their smartphones, but only at the level of tourism resources. Furthermore, it will be the consolidation of the smart tourism destination that marks the medium and long-term design of smart business.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations concern the problems of a sampling procedure. Firstly, it operates with a database of managers’ opinions; secondly, there are specificities of each company in particular.

Practical implications

The design of the smart tourism destination must incorporate the integration of tourism companies, both with a useful vision of ICTs towards the creation of experiences.

Originality/value

Research on smart business tourism is very scarce compared to smart destination and smart tourists. Also, the data are supported by managers of important tourism companies, as their companies are present at FITUR.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2020

Vanessa Gaitree Gowreesunkar, Hugues Seraphin and Mohammad Nazimuddin

Begging is undoubtedly an ancient phenomenon but when explored from the tourism perspective, it is relatively new. Begging has existed across several historical periods…

Abstract

Purpose

Begging is undoubtedly an ancient phenomenon but when explored from the tourism perspective, it is relatively new. Begging has existed across several historical periods, but with sophistication and savviness, it has developed into a lucrative form of tourism business. While previous studies have reasonably explored the beggar–tourist interaction in several socio-economic contexts, the present one attempts to research an unusual aspect of these encounters which is termed as “black market tourism.” In the current study, black market is explained as a clandestine but visible market where tourism transactions take place within three important stakeholders, namely, the beggars, the tourists and shopkeepers. The transaction is found to have some aspects of illegality, but ultimately, serves the manifest function of yielding money and growing the underground network. This triangular interaction is therefore of relevance to understand the functioning of this black market involving those key stakeholders. With this notion as foundation, this study aims to empirically and conceptually explore the phenomenon of black market tourism which is derived from the beggar–tourist– shopkeeper encounter in an important city of India called Hyderabad. The specific location of the study was Chaar Minaar, a popular tourism city with ancient monument and shopping places in Hyderabad (India). Tourism in India is undeniably infused with the notions of color and culture, but how this colorful context gradually developed into a colorless black market tourism economy is worthy of study.

Design/methodology/approach

From a methodological point of view, this conceptual paper draws on unobtrusive research methods (written records, non-participant observations, informal interviews and occasional photography).

Findings

Findings show that begging is developing into a lucrative industry without costly investment and beggars operate in a cartel. The black tourism market is found to be an emerging underground tourism economy with established stakeholders, who are rapidly progressing and growing their network. The network is seen to be increasingly attracting educated and young professionals.

Research limitations/implications

The research is explorative and provides a consistent and empirically based starting point for research on black market tourism involving beggar–tourist and beggar–shopkeeper interactions in Indian cities. The sample being very limited, it is important to stress the limited possibilities to generalize the findings of this study to other destinations. Moreover, the assumption that the background of the local researcher might have influenced the interpretation of primary data need not be neglected, thus suggesting a further examination to confirm validity of the results.

Practical implications

The study provides information not only to destination managers interested to diversify the tourism product, but also to policymakers who are fighting against begging in the city of Hyderabad. The beggar experience can be used to attract more tourists seeking authenticity, provided that the process is improved by adding in some level of professionalism. For instance, beggars could be trained to perform decently in a town hall where tourists are invited to attend cultural shows. To some extent, this study may also help empowering beggars to become part of the tourism ecosystem. This is important, as modern society has disempowered economically disadvantaged members of the community (Hutton, 2016). Ultimately, the study attempted to show that disempowered members of the community are not always passive and powerless. They can create business out of another business (a re-invented form of beggarism that has potential to generate money from tourism).

Social implications

The study has a social aspect as it takes the involvement of three stakeholders, namely, the tourists, the beggars and the shopkeepers. The study shows how begging transactions affect the three stakeholders and it sheds light on its overall impact on Hyderabad, as a tourism destination.

Originality/value

To the best of authors’ knowledge, no tourism study (academic and non-academic) has so far considered the beggar–tourist encounter from a black market perspective. The findings offer new information on a reinvented form of beggarism and unveils that this black market is a well-entrenched system operated by an educated pool of people and professionals. Ultimately, the study attempts to show that disempowered members of the community (beggars) are not always passive and powerless. They can create business out of another business (a re-invented form of beggarism that has potential to generate money out of tourism).

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Vanessa Ratten

There has been an increase in surf tourism, as surfing has gained more international prominence and popularity. Many individuals travel to surf competitions as a form of…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been an increase in surf tourism, as surfing has gained more international prominence and popularity. Many individuals travel to surf competitions as a form of leisure activity and enhance business connections. The purpose of this study is to examine the entrepreneurial intentions of tourists at a surf event by focusing on lifestyle entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study methodology of the Bells Beach surf contest, Australia, was conducted via semi-structured, in-depth interviews of surf tourists to explore their entrepreneurial behaviour.

Findings

Results reveal that many surf tourists are interested in surfing as a leisure activity but others see the potential business opportunities of the sport.

Originality/value

This study fills a gap in the literature between lifestyle entrepreneurship and surf tourism by highlighting the role of entrepreneurial intentions for developing tourism business activities. Management implications for surf tourism entrepreneurs and tourism bodies are discussed along with suggestions for future research.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 73 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Yvonne von Friedrichs Grängsjö

Owing to the complexity of the tourist product most firms in a tourist destination are interdependent on one another. As well as being competitors they also have to work…

Abstract

Owing to the complexity of the tourist product most firms in a tourist destination are interdependent on one another. As well as being competitors they also have to work together on creating the overall quality of the total tourist product. It is difficult to separate co‐operation from competition. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a co‐opetitive theory of business derived from the results given by a networking study of marketing a tourist destination dominated by micro businesses and independent entrepreneurs. The results of the study show that there are two different sets of values in the destination and these determine and distinguish the way firms are involved in networking.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Mastura Jaafar

The development of tourism and the hospitality industry has facilitated the proliferation of many small and medium accommodation businesses in this region. These usually…

Abstract

Purpose

The development of tourism and the hospitality industry has facilitated the proliferation of many small and medium accommodation businesses in this region. These usually depend on the attractiveness of tourism products offered in each destination. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the entrepreneurial marketing aspect of accommodation businesses in three urban cities and islands in East Peninsular Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed‐method research was conducted on 64 urban hotels and 52 island chalet operators in East Peninsular Malaysia. The results indicate that urban operators are more entrepreneurial than island operators.

Findings

To ensure their continued existence in the industry, these operators have adopted different marketing practices. Each tourist destination attracts a different set of tourist profiles and features varying marketing practices. The significant differences in the types of entrepreneurial marketing practiced by urban and island operators are explored in detail in this study.

Originality/value

In implementing a new economic model towards being a high income‐generating country, the tourism sector has become a main driver contributing to the Malaysian economy. With the main objective of maximizing the advantages of a strategic location, together with the comparative advantages arising from its natural resources, the findings are rather fit to the tourism industry.

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Book part
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Mark Anthony Camilleri

This chapter introduces its readers to the concept of tourism. It sheds light on the rationale for tourism, as it explains the tourists’ inherent motivations to travel. It…

Abstract

This chapter introduces its readers to the concept of tourism. It sheds light on the rationale for tourism, as it explains the tourists’ inherent motivations to travel. It also describes different aspects that together make up the tourism industry. Tourists travel to destinations that are accessible to them. They require accommodation if they are visiting a place for more than 24 hours. Leisure and business travellers may also visit attractions, and engage in recreational activities. Hence, the tourist destinations should have the right amenities and facilities. In this light, this chapter clarifies how destinations may offer different products to satisfy a wide array of tourists. Tourism products can include urban (or city) tourism, seaside tourism, rural tourism, ecotourism, wine tourism, culinary tourism, health tourism, medical tourism, religious tourism, cultural (or heritage) tourism, sports tourism, educational tourism, business tourism (including meetings, incentives, conferences and events), among others.

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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