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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Paula J. Haynes, Richard C. Becherer and Marilyn M. Helms

The findings of a study by Auger and Gallaugher (1997), in addition to suppositions and anecdotal evidence provided in a number of articles, suggest that there may be key…

Abstract

The findings of a study by Auger and Gallaugher (1997), in addition to suppositions and anecdotal evidence provided in a number of articles, suggest that there may be key areas of difference as well as similarities in Internet usage patterns among small and mid‐sized businesses. Since large businesses are both potential customers of and suppliers to small to mid‐sized businesses, it is important to understand their Internet usage patterns as well. The study was designed as a preliminary examination contrasting such usage among large and small and mid‐sized owner‐operated firms. Study findings suggest mid‐sized businesses may be at a competitive disadvantage in their current operational use of the Internet. Small businesses in the study were more likely than mid‐sized or large firms to have a home page and to reveal computer/technology programs as potential Internet services needed to improve current operations. Future research must continue to examine the role the Internet can play in allowing small and mid‐sized businesses to be more competitive in today’s technology based global environment.

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2019

Shun Ye, Honggen Xiao, Tianyu Ying and Lingqiang Zhou

This paper aims to model and empirically test the determinants of small accommodation business (SAB) size.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to model and empirically test the determinants of small accommodation business (SAB) size.

Design/methodology/approach

This study distinguishes among three aspects of SAB size (accommodation scale, investment and employment) and between two modes of growth (managerial and entrepreneurial growth). A conceptual framework was developed based on business growth theory, whereby three econometric models were constructed and estimated to predict size variations. Data were collected through a survey on 200 SABs in North Zhejiang Province of China. Effects of the determinants were contrasted between different size indicators.

Findings

The SAB size can be affected by personal factors (employed working experience, education level, industry-specific know-how), interpersonal factor (relative ties to other SABs) and environmental factor (association support). The interpersonal and environmental factors tend to contribute to managerial growth, while the personal factors are usually conducive to entrepreneurial growth.

Research limitations/implications

This study addresses the questions of “why some SABs grow larger in size than others” and “why different SABs grow in different ways”. But more contexts and business types should be examined so as to ensure generalizability through future studies.

Practical implications

The research findings can provide guidelines for local tourism administration to encourage or regulate SAB development.

Originality/value

This study is among the first endeavors to examine the multidimensionality and determinants of business size in tourism and hospitality; it contributes to literature by expanding tourism entrepreneurship research into a/the “growth paradigm”.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Victoria Bordonaba‐Juste, Laura Lucia‐Palacios and Yolanda Polo‐Redondo

There are two purposes of this paper: first, to analyze the effect of size and other organizational factors (IT knowledge, IT external support and the level of employees'…

Abstract

Purpose

There are two purposes of this paper: first, to analyze the effect of size and other organizational factors (IT knowledge, IT external support and the level of employees' education) on the use of e‐business; and second, to identify similarities and differences among these factors in micro, small, medium‐sized and large enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed model is empirically tested using data from the Sectorial e‐Business W@tch survey. A logit estimation for the whole sample and for each type of firm size has been implemented on the use of e‐business.

Findings

The study finds positive and significant effects of all the organizational factors on the intensity of e‐business use. When analyzing the effect of size, it was found that medium‐sized and large firms are more likely to use e‐business more intensively. Although medium‐sized and large firms are similar, some differences have been found between small and medium‐sized firms. Only small firms use IT outsourcing as a key factor to use e‐business.

Research limitations/implications

This study is based on a cross‐sectional data set. Longitudinal research would be needed for comparing results over time. Future studies could focus on the use of each type of e‐business technology, instead of a global measure of e‐business use. Future research could also analyze the differences of e‐business adoption rates among countries.

Practical implications

The paper concludes that small and micro firms are less likely to conduct e‐business than medium‐sized and large firms. An important influence on the use of e‐business is workforce education, implying that training could substitute hiring IT employees. Outsourcing IT activities is a suitable strategy only for small firms.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature on e‐business with new evidence of the importance of size and human capital. Additionally, an analysis for each firm size has been done, which allows comparison of results.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2008

Davood Askarany and Malcolm Smith

Size is one of the most controversial influencing factors in the diffusion literature. This paper seeks to shed light on this controversy by examining the relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

Size is one of the most controversial influencing factors in the diffusion literature. This paper seeks to shed light on this controversy by examining the relationship between business size and the diffusion of both technological innovation and activity‐based costing (ABC) as an administrative innovation. The findings are expected to provide some guidelines for managers in helping them to determine how to facilitate the diffusion of innovations in their organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopts a longitudinal survey method to examine practices within the Plastics and Chemicals Industries Association, which is the pre‐eminent national body representing Australia's fourth largest manufacturing sector.

Findings

The study suggests a significant positive relationship between business size and both technological innovation and the implementation of ABC.

Originality/value

Knowledge of the impact of size on diffusion of innovation has been complicated by the mixed results of extant studies; the paper significantly contributes to this debate.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 23 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2009

Allen N. Berger and Philip Ostromogolsky

The purpose of this paper is to identify which small businesses are most “debt sensitive”, or most likely to be affected by banking market conditions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify which small businesses are most “debt sensitive”, or most likely to be affected by banking market conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

For the primary debt sensitivity categories, the paper hypothesizes that bank conditions are most likely to have significant effects on firms in size classes and industries that are “on the bubble” for credit availability (probability of credit close to 0.50), rather than those with “relatively easy” or “relatively difficult” access to credit (probability much higher or lower, respectively). The secondary classifications also require that loans fund a substantial proportion of assets for the firms in the category that have loans. These hypotheses are tested using a comprehensive data set of US small businesses by size class and industry matched with variables measuring bank market power, market structure, and efficiency in the firm's local markets.

Findings

Findings show that the data are consistent with the hypotheses, with the strongest support for the hypotheses occurring using the secondary classifications. In terms of policy implications, the findings suggest that the credit availability of small, debt‐sensitive firms may be reduced by within‐market mergers that increase concentration in rural markets, but that the more common type of recent consolidation – creating larger banks that operate in more markets – may be associated with an increase in credit availability for these sensitive firms. Such an increase in credit availability would be magnified if consolidation resulted in increased bank operating efficiency.

Originality/value

The paper offers insights into the effect of banks on “debt‐sensitive” small businesses.

Details

Journal of Financial Economic Policy, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-6385

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2018

Hellen Adzo Seshie-Nasser and Abena Daagye Oduro

Contrary to the gender gap in favour of men in entrepreneurial activity elsewhere, in Ghana more women own businesses. This paper aims to examine the correlates between…

Abstract

Purpose

Contrary to the gender gap in favour of men in entrepreneurial activity elsewhere, in Ghana more women own businesses. This paper aims to examine the correlates between women’s business ownership and household welfare in Ghana and the socio-economic factors that affect business size.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a nationally representative survey data and ordinary least squares and IV regression methods.

Findings

The findings reveal that more businesses are owned by women and their business ownership is associated with improved welfare for the household, yet still there exists size gap in favour of men. The implication is that potentials exist for poverty reduction and economic growth if policy invests in the size of women businesses. Also, while unpaid work limits entrepreneurial activity for women, older children help to reduce the time constraint.

Originality/value

The study uses individual-level business ownership data on a developing country (Ghana) to examine the link between women entrepreneurship and household welfare. This is new in the literature, when individual level data is readily not available in developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Stefan Kohler

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between different areas of workplace health promotion (WHP) activities and predictors of the number of areas…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between different areas of workplace health promotion (WHP) activities and predictors of the number of areas in which WHP activities are offered.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire with ten questions on WHP was mailed to the 478 largest businesses in Berlin and Brandenburg, Germany. The cross-sectional data from this survey are presented and explored using correlation and linear regression analyses.

Findings

In total, 30 businesses, of which 90 percent offered WHP activities, participated in the survey. Businesses with WHP were, on average, active in 5.59 (SD=2.24) areas of health promotion. Offering an activity was positively correlated with offering an activity in at least one other area for all WHP areas except ergonomic workplace design (p < 0.05). Among businesses offering WHP, reporting that WHP would be strengthened with more support (−2.02, 95 percent CI: −4.04 to −0.01) and being a medium-sized business with an information need (−3.63, 95 percent CI: −5.70 to −1.57) or an opinion that health insurance companies should offer WHP (−1.96, 95 percent CI: −3.86 to −0.05) were all associated with offering activities in fewer WHP areas. In a multiple regression analysis, the information need of mid-size businesses was the only significant predictor (−5.25, 95 percent CI: −9.41 to −1.08).

Practical implications

Addressing the information needs of medium-sized businesses concerning WHP could be an effective strategy for increasing the spectrum of WHP activities offered.

Originality/value

This study complements existing studies by assessing associations between WHP activities and predictors of WHP activity emphasizing business size.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Angel Luis Meroño Cerdan and Antonio José Carrasco Hernández

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the familiar character of the firm affects its size and performance. Specifically, if the confluence of business and family…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the familiar character of the firm affects its size and performance. Specifically, if the confluence of business and family dimensions affects their chances of survival.

Design/methodology/approach

With data from 581 family, small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs), the possible negative relationship between family, on the one hand, and size and performance, on the other hand is analyzed. First, the authors made a cluster analysis which distinguishes four groups attending the source of management, family next to external, and the generation, first against the rest. In addition, the authors contrast the existence of non‐linear adjustment through quadratic regressions.

Findings

Cluster analysis shows that the firms with family management in first generation are the ones with smaller size and worse performance. Regression analysis contrasts the negative relationship, but exclusively linear in nature. For all companies, regardless of the familiar character, the study confirms a negative relation of quadratic character. This paper clarifies the theories about the life cycle, so that they may be applicable to the family business. The companies must overcome the early stages, where the entrepreneurial impulse is key, to give way to more professionalized structures.

Originality/value

There are two fundamental contributions of this study. The first relates to the use of quadratic functions to model the relationship between family management and size and performance. The second relates to the life cycle of the family business and the role played by the family management; for that end the authors compare companies of family management in first generation with other companies to see to what extent the decision to retain a smaller size to preserve the family character is intentional.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2020

Anyuan Shen and Surinder Tikoo

This study aims to examine the relationship between family business identity disclosure by firms and consumer product evaluations and the moderating impact, if any, of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between family business identity disclosure by firms and consumer product evaluations and the moderating impact, if any, of firm size on this relationship. Toward this end, the study seeks to develop a theoretical explanation for how consumers process family business identity information.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative pre-study was conducted to obtain preliminary evidence that consumers’ perceptions of family businesses originate from both family- and business-based category beliefs. A product evaluation experiment, involving young adult subjects, was used to test the research hypotheses, and the experiment data were analyzed using MANOVA.

Findings

The key finding was that the effect of family business identity disclosure on consumer product evaluations is moderated by firm size.

Practical implications

This research has implications for businesses seeking to promote their family business identity in branding communications.

Originality/value

This research provides a theoretical account of why consumers might hold different perceptions of family business brands. The interactive effect of firm size and family business identity information disclosure on consumer product evaluations contributes new insight to family business branding.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Cristina López-Cózar-Navarro, Tiziana Priede-Bergamini and Sonia Benito-Hernández

The purpose of this paper is to suggest two main objectives: to analyze if the size of the company is determined by the use of external legal and human resources (HR…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to suggest two main objectives: to analyze if the size of the company is determined by the use of external legal and human resources (HR) advice; and to analyze if the size of the family business is determined by the use of these two same types of external advice.

Design/methodology/approach

The assessment is developed (2,013 firms, the Spanish industrial sector) by using descriptive statistics to compare the features of the different types of firms in the sample: family and non-family ones. This is completed with a test of equality of means and using econometric models.

Findings

Regarding legal advice, results show that as far as legal matters are concerned, when family businesses make greater use of this type of advice, they are smaller. This is a remarkable and interesting result because it differs from non-family firms, in which the use of this type of advice is positively related with size. Regarding the use of HR advice, while it remains significant in general cases with a positive result, this is not the same for family firms.

Originality/value

The use of advising in family firms is seldom dealt with in the literature, despite its helpfulness for family firm managers. There is gap in this field and a great deal of interesting research remains to be developed, because the authors consider that factors determining the use of advice in family and non-family firms are different.

Propósito

El presente documento propone dos objetivos principales: (1) analizar si el tamaño de la empresa está relacionado con el uso de asesoramiento externo tanto jurídico como de recursos humanos. (2) examinar si para el caso de la empresa familiar su tamaño está relacionado por el uso de estos dos mismos tipos de asesoramiento externo.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

El análisis se desarrolló (2.013 empresas, el sector industrial español) utilizando técnicas de la estadística descriptiva para comparar las características de los diferentes tipos de empresas de la muestra: familiares y no familiares queridos. Esto se completa con una prueba de la igualdad de medios y el uso de modelos econométricos.

Hallazgos

En cuanto a asesoramiento jurídico, los resultados muestran que, en lo que se refiere a asuntos legales, las empresas familiares hacen un mayor uso de este tipo de consejos a medida que son más pequeñas. Este es un resultado notable e interesante, ya que se diferencia de las no familiares, en las que el uso de este tipo de asesoramiento se relaciona positivamente con el tamaño. Respecto al uso de asesoramiento de recursos humanos, mientras que sigue siendo significativa en los casos generales con un resultado positivo, este no es el mismo para las empresas familiares.

Originalidad/valor

El uso de asesoramiento en las empresas familiares rara vez se aborda en la literatura, a pesar de su utilidad para los directivos de este tipo de empresas. Hay un vacío en este campo y una gran cantidad de investigación interesante que queda por desarrollar, teniendo en cuenta sobre todo, que los factores que determinan el uso de asesoramiento en las empresas familiares y no familiares no son los mismos.

Details

Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administración, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1012-8255

Keywords

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