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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Peter Homa

Achieving more from less is a preoccupation of many organizationsin the turbulent 1990s. Midst the maelstrom of apparently mutuallyexclusive organizational objectives…

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Abstract

Achieving more from less is a preoccupation of many organizations in the turbulent 1990s. Midst the maelstrom of apparently mutually exclusive organizational objectives, managers respond to what may turn out to be the siren call of business process re‐engineering. Rapid assimilation of business process re‐engineering into managerial practice in the 1990s is arresting. However, a number of articles on the subject have been based on hyperbole rather than evidence. Considers and examines theoretical antecedents of business process re‐engineering within the context of this decade’s challenges. Uses empirical evidence to provide evidence‐based critical success factors for business process re‐engineering programmes. Discusses indications for future research in business process re‐engineering. Places emphasis on the need to bridge the lacuna between business process re‐engineering theory and evidence‐based practice.

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Business Process Re-engineering & Management Journal, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2503

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Business process re‐engineering (BPR) is certainly one of the latest buzzwords and is the subject of great interest and also great controversy. Organizations need to shake…

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1045

Abstract

Business process re‐engineering (BPR) is certainly one of the latest buzzwords and is the subject of great interest and also great controversy. Organizations need to shake themselves out of complacency to close competitive gaps and achieve superior performance standards ‐ the reason why many have embarked on huge BPR projects. In view of the high risks associated with radical change, there are, however, many problems associated with BPR. For some BPR is going off the rails before it is properly understood, and many BPR exercises are not delivering the goods. Sometimes, organizations are expecting “quick fixes”, thus displaying their lack of understanding of a complex system. It is unreasonable to expect quick results when so much change is involved, especially when these business processes involve not only machines, but also people. Many believe, such as Mumford, that the management of change is the largest task in re‐engineering. Many people perceive re‐engineering as a threat to both their methods and their jobs. Owing to this recognition, many authors concentrate on the need to take account of the human side of re‐engineering, in particular the management of organizational change.

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Work Study, vol. 44 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

This special “Anbar Abstracts” issue of Work Study is split into six sections covering abstracts under the following headings: Operational research and statistics; Project…

Abstract

This special “Anbar Abstracts” issue of Work Study is split into six sections covering abstracts under the following headings: Operational research and statistics; Project management, method study and work measurement; Business process re‐engineering; Design of work; Performance, productivity and motivation; Stock control and supply chain management.

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Work Study, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Chung For Choi and Stephen L. Chan

Business process re‐engineering is a hot topic around management and information systems areas. However, the verdict of the new idea is not clear and reports of successful…

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3562

Abstract

Business process re‐engineering is a hot topic around management and information systems areas. However, the verdict of the new idea is not clear and reports of successful cases are not numerous. Analyses the definitions and characteristics of business process re‐engineering (BPR). Reports on a literature survey on the critical failure reasons and success factors. Recognizes that the lack of clear concepts and understanding of BPR definitions creates many problems and, therefore, compares the BPR effort with other improvement programmes such as automation, downsizing, total quality management (TQM) for a better understanding of BPR. Suggests a methodology which can be used as general guidelines for management and re‐engineers in performing BPR to enhance success for BPR efforts.

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Business Process Management Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Maria Vakola

Explores the role of evaluation in a business process re‐engineering initiative and its relationship with organisational learning and innovation. The paper presents the…

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1952

Abstract

Explores the role of evaluation in a business process re‐engineering initiative and its relationship with organisational learning and innovation. The paper presents the evaluation of the implementation of a business process re‐engineering project in three case studies. The implementation of the BPR project was based on an eight‐stage BPR methodology. The participating companies were asked to evaluate the implementation, describe the decisions made in order to adapt to the change process and analyse the potential benefits that they expect in terms of business performance improvement, organisational effectiveness and user acceptability. Discusses the evaluation results of the implementation of business process re‐engineering model in three case studies in order to identify links with organisational learning and innovation.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 19 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Tânia R. Belmiro, Paul D. Gardiner, John E.L. Simmons and Antonio F. Rentes

Business process re‐engineering (BPR), a management tool that initially advocated a revolution in the way businesses are driven, now carries the stigma of being a major…

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Abstract

Business process re‐engineering (BPR), a management tool that initially advocated a revolution in the way businesses are driven, now carries the stigma of being a major cause of job elimination. This study reveals the depth of involvement of BPR practitioners in what, advocates claim, are the fundamental ingredients of BPR – business processes. The data alert the reader to the different understandings and practices related to business process analysis held by several UK and Brazilian companies. Possible reasons are given, accounting for why some of the companies investigated seemed to lose a BPR focus in favour of more urgent restructuring matters. The authors conclude that companies often lack a basic awareness of the business process concept, and that misconceptions about these issues can lead to unrealised expectations at various levels in the organization.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 20 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Arie Halachmi

Why should anybody outside the USA care about the attempt toreorganize the Disability Determination Service (DDS) of the SocialSecurity Administration (SSA)? Part of the…

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365

Abstract

Why should anybody outside the USA care about the attempt to reorganize the Disability Determination Service (DDS) of the Social Security Administration (SSA)? Part of the answer to this question has to do with the assumptions and approaches which were used. In fact, the attempt to reorganize DDS is one of the first well‐documented attempts to re‐engineer a major agency in the public sector. Given the excitement in the private sector about re‐engineering and its potential and possible cost, public managers everywhere should develop a better understanding of what re‐engineering is all about. The use of a case study seems to be a promising way for framing and illustrating some of the important questions about the use of re‐engineering in the public sector.

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Work Study, vol. 44 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1996

Nerev F. Kock, Robert J. McQueen and Megan Baker

Recent surveys show that process‐reengineering (BPR) has had widespread adoption in western countries. This has been motivated by case studies where drastic improvements…

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1215

Abstract

Recent surveys show that process‐reengineering (BPR) has had widespread adoption in western countries. This has been motivated by case studies where drastic improvements in quality, productivity, cost reduction and competitiveness have been reported. The rate of failure in re‐engineering attempts, though, has been reported to be equally high. It is estimated that over 70 per cent of all re‐engineering attempts fail to produce bottom‐line improvements. Describes one such failed attempt in a large public organization in Brazil. As a result of the re‐engineering attempt, the organization had its IT infrastructure significantly improved, and the access to IT was decentralized by the downsizing of computer applications from a mainframe to a local area network. On the other hand, no radical changes in the organization’s business processes had resulted, despite the US$ 8 million invested in the BPR attempt. Moreover, even though some processes had been automated, almost no staff reduction was effected. The lack of layoffs meant that even the increase in efficiency in those processes, which by no means was radical, was not realized.

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International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

P.E.D. Love and H. Li

As construction is a project‐orientated industry, it is suggested in this paper that traditional business process re‐engineering (BPR) will only improve…

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1694

Abstract

As construction is a project‐orientated industry, it is suggested in this paper that traditional business process re‐engineering (BPR) will only improve intra‐organisational business processes, not the inter‐organisational normally used to procure construction facilities because of the degree of process incompatibility between participating organisations. The aim of this paper is to explain why traditional BPR is not considered to be an effective method for improving the performance of projects. The paper argues that an alternative to BPR is needed and suggests that construction process re‐engineering, founded on the “new production philosophy” should be used to initiate change at a project level. Models for re‐engineering processes in construction at a company and project level are presented and discussed.

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Business Process Management Journal, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

John O. Burdett

Looks at how some organizations are turning away from total qualitymanagement (TQM) and looking in another direction to solve theirproblems. The new concept is …

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1357

Abstract

Looks at how some organizations are turning away from total quality management (TQM) and looking in another direction to solve their problems. The new concept is “re‐engineering”. It offers breakthrough solutions for what seem to be intractable problems. Discusses why TQM is now coming under criticism and presents the case for re‐engineering (a radical way to rethink the way in which organizations work). Describes Hammer and Champy’s nine fundamentals to re‐engineering and shows that many of the concepts/techniques are not new but are appropriate in their timing. Evaluates the role of TQM versus re‐engineering and concludes that re‐engineering neither replaces nor is a substitute for TQM; in fact they both add value and are complementary. Corporate warriors will need to know how to use both.

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The TQM Magazine, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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