Search results

1 – 10 of over 18000
Article
Publication date: 19 July 2018

Rajko Novak and Aleksander Janeš

The purpose of this paper is to empirically evaluate business process orientation (BPO) of the Slovenian power supply business.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically evaluate business process orientation (BPO) of the Slovenian power supply business.

Design/methodology/approach

Within the empirical investigation, the level of BPO maturity was measured in the 19 organizations of the power supply business. The survey was focused on the top, middle and lower managers. As a measuring instrument, a questionnaire for the extended concept of process orientation with nine elements was used.

Findings

The results of the BPO measurement show that, despite this long-standing preoccupation with processes, certified management system and the computerization of operations, process maturity is not high. Particularly the lowest score for information technology represents a surprise.

Practical implications

This research makes significant contributions to the literature and above all to scholars and practitioners who work professionally in this field and will find useful guidance for a better understanding of applying BPO and maturity models.

Social implications

One important reason for performing the maturity measurement in the power supply business is the importance of its activities for the operation and development and environmental impact of the whole of Slovenian society.

Originality/value

Presented research is the first one which considers the BPO maturity in the Slovenian power supply business and therefore contributes to understanding of the “intangible factors” which have impact on the introduction of business process management and BPO.

Article
Publication date: 3 September 2018

Made Andriani, T.M.A. Ari Samadhi, Joko Siswanto and Kadarsah Suryadi

This study aims to develop a business process maturity model, especially on operation processes, based on the characteristics of each organisational growth stage, to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop a business process maturity model, especially on operation processes, based on the characteristics of each organisational growth stage, to increase small and medium enterprises (SMEs) growth. With this information, SMEs can identify their needs and priorities for business process improvement based on the characteristics that are inherent in the organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed model was developed by reviewing the literature on previous studies related to the organisational life cycle and its characteristics, as well as a business process maturity model. Furthermore, historical case studies were conducted to validate the proposed model. Case study objects in this research were fashion industry companies that have grown from an SME scale to national level.

Findings

The results of this research indicate that the characteristics of each growth stage are different, which led to increased complexity and maturity of business processes run. Therefore, SMEs should pay attention to their growth stages, as a basis to improve their business process maturity, especially on the critical processes, which are evaluate products performance, design products and services and monitor sales. Through this model, SMEs can determine the business’ current growth stage and use the proposed model as guidance for business process improvement to accelerate organisational growth.

Research limitations/implications

Validation of the proposed model was done by conducting a historical case study. To generalise the model, it is recommended to survey similar industry and test quantitatively using statistical methods. However, further research can be used in other industries that might yield different results. Besides, this research can also be developed in the supporting process categories.

Practical implications

This study provides a practical guide for SMEs to identify their current growth stage, and implement the measurement of business process maturity level. Maturity level standard at every growth stage can be used in determining the priority of business process improvement to drive organisational growth.

Originality/value

Through this research, the BPMM method was developed to enable SMEs to implement a self-evaluation process without seeking external assistance and assess their needs through a clear and understandable scale allowing for further development of the business. By using this method, SMEs can manage their business processes maturity level to encourage its growth.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 September 2021

Dries Couckuyt and Amy Van Looy

The discipline of business process management (BPM) is challenged by investigating how work is performed in organizations while simultaneously recognizing preeminent…

Abstract

Purpose

The discipline of business process management (BPM) is challenged by investigating how work is performed in organizations while simultaneously recognizing preeminent environmental issues. Although organizations have become more open to the ecological impact of business processes through Green BPM, research in this field and guidance for practitioners remains relatively limited. Therefore, this study aims to extend and translate the conventional perspective on business process maturity towards green business process maturity levels.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors bridged product-focussed and process-focussed environmental management practices by surveying ecolabels against theoretical capability areas for business process maturity. Since ecolabels are instruments to develop environmental-friendly products and services, the authors looked at the underlying processes to produce such green outcomes. By surveying 89 ecolabel organizations, the authors had indirectly access to an international set of companies, operating in distinct industries and producing a wide variety of green products and services.

Findings

The authors statistically uncovered a classification of four groups of ecolabels based on the process capabilities, each representing a distinct green business process maturity level. The four levels are “Green BP immaturity”, “Green BPL maturity”, “Green BPM maturity” and “Green BPO maturity” and align with well-established concepts in the business process literature and profession.

Originality/value

Scholars are encouraged to elaborate on the identified maturity levels in order to build and test a green business process maturity model, whereas practitioner-related advice is provided based on possible green business process maturity journeys towards excellence.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2019

Marek Szelagowski and Justyna Berniak-Woźny

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the current business process management (BPM) maturity models meet the requirements of evaluating organizations in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the current business process management (BPM) maturity models meet the requirements of evaluating organizations in the knowledge economy (KE) which manage processes in a dynamic way.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, a content analysis of the OMG (2008) Business Process Maturity Model and ten research papers on the practical application of business process management maturity models was conducted. The nature of the study is descriptive and based solely on information from secondary data sources.

Findings

The research results reveal that the current BPM maturity models do not correspond with the knowledge-based organizations and take into account knowledge-intensive (usually dynamic) processes in a very limited way. That is why the adaptation of the current BPM maturity models to the KE is needed.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the BPM theory and practice in two ways. First, it provides an enhanced insight into the requirements of the KE toward BPM and BPM maturity models by distinguishing between static and dynamic processes. Second, it formulates the recommendations on possible ways of adapting the current BPM maturity models to the requirements of the KE.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Archie Lockamy and Kevin McCormack

The concept of process maturity proposes that a process has a lifecycle that is assessed by the extent to which the process is explicitly defined, managed, measured and…

15743

Abstract

The concept of process maturity proposes that a process has a lifecycle that is assessed by the extent to which the process is explicitly defined, managed, measured and controlled. A maturity model assumes that progress towards goal achievement comes in stages. The supply chain maturity model presented in this paper is based on concepts developed by researchers over the past two decades. The Software Engineering Institute has also applied the concept of process maturity to the software development process in the form of the capability maturity model. This paper examines the relationship between supply chain management process maturity and performance, and provides a supply chain management process maturity model for enhanced supply chain performance.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2009

Kevin McCormack, Jurgen Willems, Joachim van den Bergh, Dirk Deschoolmeester, Peter Willaert, Mojca Indihar Štemberger, Rok Škrinjar, Peter Trkman, Marcelo Bronzo Ladeira, Marcos Paulo Valadares de Oliveira, Vesna Bosilj Vuksic and Nikola Vlahovic

The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of research into the precedence of the maturity factors, or key turning points in business process maturity (BPM…

3363

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of research into the precedence of the maturity factors, or key turning points in business process maturity (BPM) implementation efforts. A key turning point is a component of BPM that stabilizes within an organization and leads to the next maturity level.

Design/methodology/approach

Several years of data from over 1,000 companies in the USA, Europe, China, and Brazil that have completed a BPM assessment are analyzed to identify which components of BPM stabilize, when and in what order. Different analysis methods are employed in order to identify global commonalities and differences.

Findings

The paper identifies key turning points from several different perspectives using several different approaches and develops some conclusions common to all methods used in this research.

Research limitations/implications

The relationship between the components (dependencies) is only suggested but not statistically analyzed. Several data sets are also on the low end of sample size for the methods used and some parts of the research used ad hoc selection of companies of arbitrarily distributed companies into different groups.

Practical implications

The results can be useful for leaders and teams that are attempting the journey to process maturity. The guide‐posts, milestones, and measures can help answer the question “Where am I on this journey and what is next?”

Originality/value

A plethora of maturity models has emerged that claim to guide an organization through the process of building levels of maturity that lead to competitive advantage. To date, there has been a lack of quantitative studies documenting these road‐maps. The paper provides global, quantitative evidence of the critical maturity components associated at each level of maturity.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Roland Jochem, Dennis Geers and Priscilla Heinze

The methods of quality management, business process management and knowledge management have until now been exploited by science and the industry separately. An…

2197

Abstract

Purpose

The methods of quality management, business process management and knowledge management have until now been exploited by science and the industry separately. An integration of these disciplines could unlock the potential of a solid structure to measure and gradually improve knowledge transfer processes. This paper aims to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

A maturity model was developed for SMEs to measure and assess the quality of their business processes. This enabled the companies to determine their existing status and to take the necessary actions for the competence development of their business processes, which should contribute to the attainment of their knowledge management goals.

Research limitations/implications

This paper introduces a maturity model for knowledge‐intensive business processes that enables companies to determine their processes' actual state and take the corresponding actions for their business processes improvement, in which special attention is being given to small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs).

Originality/value

The paper proposes an SME‐specified maturity model for knowledge‐intensive business processes. Its assessment procedure is developed based on literature researches and investigation of real processes of two industrial SMEs. This maturity model has advantages over other existing models since it accounts for the needs of SMEs by incorporating the company preference over the measured areas.

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Dalia Suša Vugec, Vesna Bosilj Vukšić, Mirjana Pejić Bach, Jurij Jaklič and Mojca Indihar Štemberger

Organizations introduce business intelligence (BI) to increase their performance, but often, this initiative is not aligned with the business process management (BPM…

2213

Abstract

Purpose

Organizations introduce business intelligence (BI) to increase their performance, but often, this initiative is not aligned with the business process management (BPM) initiative, which also aims to improve organizational performance. Although some findings from the literature indicate that BI implementation has a positive impact on organizational performance, the impact seems to be indirect. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to enhance the understanding of how BI maturity is translated into organizational performance. Alignment of BI and BPM initiatives seems one possible way for creating business value with BI, particularly because BI enables process performance measurement and management, which allows the BI initiative to become more business focused.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was prepared and used to collect data in Croatian and Slovenian organizations with more than 50 employees. A BI–BPM alignment measurement instrument was developed for the purpose of this study using the recommended process of scale development and validation. A total of 185 responses were analyzed by the structural equation modeling technique.

Findings

Our results provide evidence that the effect of BI on organizational performance is fully mediated by alignment of BI and BPM initiatives, and therefore, BI business value can be generated through the use of common terminology and methodologies, as well as a strong communication between BI and BPM experts, managers and teams in order to coordinate the two initiatives.

Originality/value

This study has responded to the call for better understanding of how the impact of BI on organization performance is realized. It confirmed that BI and BPM initiatives should be aligned in order to give BI a business value.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 March 2021

Inêz Manuele dos Santos, Caroline Maria de Miranda Mota and Luciana Hazin Alencar

This paper aims to propose a conceptual framework to integrate a maturity model to the supply chain (SC) strategy, in order to understand how a maturity model can be…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a conceptual framework to integrate a maturity model to the supply chain (SC) strategy, in order to understand how a maturity model can be useful in diagnosing and developing the capabilities of SC business processes (BPs) to meet SC's strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed framework was based on an SC strategy framework, in which a maturity model was added in order to diagnose and identify SC process capabilities that need to be developed, per maturity level, according to the type of SC strategy and the competitive strategy. A grid was proposed to analyze the relationship between them. An exploratory case study (multiple cases) was applied to verify the applicability of the model.

Findings

Findings indicate that a maturity model can delimit and align, as far as the company needs to reach, the SC strategic interests with the company's competitive objectives. However, some barriers and facilitating factors implicit can impact on this alignment. It is also noted that the maximum level of SC management (SCM) maturity may not be in the strategic interest of the company.

Originality/value

Due to the few empirical studies on the value of maturity models, this research contributes to the understanding of the usefulness of an SC process maturity model for the SC strategy. Moreover, the framework can show how a maturity model can serve as a parameter and guide to develop the capabilities of processes, resources and activities to meet the SC strategy and the reach of the competitive strategy.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 June 2019

Guido Ongena and Pascal Ravesteyn

The importance of contextual factors is increasingly recognized in the field of business process management (BPM). The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relation…

1478

Abstract

Purpose

The importance of contextual factors is increasingly recognized in the field of business process management (BPM). The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relation between BPM maturity and process performance and the uncharted differences of two contextual factors (size and sector) in this relation.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical investigation is presented based on a sample of 165 organizations. Using partial least square-multi group analysis (PLS-MGA) differences between size and sector are investigated.

Findings

Overall, information technology, resources and knowledge and process measurement are the most pivotal BPM maturity dimensions that contribute to a better organizational process performance. The results showed no differences between private and public organizations in the relation between BPM maturity dimensions and process performance. In contrast, product organizations benefit more than service organizations from continuous improvement of their processes. Moreover, utilizing IT technology is more beneficial for small organizations rather than large organizations.

Originality/value

There is a clear lack of empirical studies investigating the role of context. This research extends the limited body of literature that investigated contextual factors in the field of BPM. It is the first study to add size and sector in the posited multi-dimensional model of BPM maturity dimensions and process performance. The results provide guidance for scholars and practitioners that work on BPM practices in different contexts.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 18000