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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Danica Bakotic and Ante Krnic

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate and clarify the relationship between business process improvement and employees’ behavior. More precisely, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate and clarify the relationship between business process improvement and employees’ behavior. More precisely, the purpose is to test whether a business process improvement initiative has a positive impact on performance and employees’ behavior, namely, motivation, communication and knowledge sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical research of this paper was conducted in the year 2013 in an ICT company on 52 employees who worked in the company’s R&D Centre. Business process improvement is analyzed in the change of work method for software development. Two projects of software development were observed. The data about the projects were collected by using the company’s documentation. The data about employees’ behavior were collected by a specially designed questionnaire.

Findings

Business process improvement led to better results and overall performance. Furthermore, it was found that business process improvement enhanced three important elements of employees’ behavior. These are motivation, communication and knowledge sharing.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitations of this study are small research sample, focusing on just the way of business process improvement and on only one company. Therefore, the results cannot be generalized and considered as being generally accepted.

Practical implications

The findings of this study could be useful for ICT companies because it shows the benefits of the Kanban method.

Originality/value

The major contribution of this study is to prove the positive impact of business process improvement initiatives on overall performance and on the special elements of employees’ behavior. This cognition enhances the existing knowledge on business process improvements.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Business process re‐engineering (BPR) is certainly one of the latest buzzwords and is the subject of great interest and also great controversy. Organizations need to shake…

Abstract

Business process re‐engineering (BPR) is certainly one of the latest buzzwords and is the subject of great interest and also great controversy. Organizations need to shake themselves out of complacency to close competitive gaps and achieve superior performance standards ‐ the reason why many have embarked on huge BPR projects. In view of the high risks associated with radical change, there are, however, many problems associated with BPR. For some BPR is going off the rails before it is properly understood, and many BPR exercises are not delivering the goods. Sometimes, organizations are expecting “quick fixes”, thus displaying their lack of understanding of a complex system. It is unreasonable to expect quick results when so much change is involved, especially when these business processes involve not only machines, but also people. Many believe, such as Mumford, that the management of change is the largest task in re‐engineering. Many people perceive re‐engineering as a threat to both their methods and their jobs. Owing to this recognition, many authors concentrate on the need to take account of the human side of re‐engineering, in particular the management of organizational change.

Details

Work Study, vol. 44 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2011

Gregor Zellner

The purpose of this paper is to provide a structured overview of so‐called business process improvement (BPI) approaches and their contribution to the actual act of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a structured overview of so‐called business process improvement (BPI) approaches and their contribution to the actual act of improving. Even though a lot is said about BPI, there is still a lack of supporting the act of improving the process. Most approaches concentrate on what needs to be done before and after the improvement act, but the act of improving itself still seems to be a black box.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is mainly based on a review of literature that deals with the term “Business Process Improvement”. The analysis of the literature is supported by qualitative content analysis. The structure of the evaluation follows the mandatory elements of a method (MEM).

Findings

A lot of literature and consulting approaches deal with the restructuring and improvement of business processes. The author finds that even so‐called BPI approaches do not describe the act of improvement itself. And if they do, they lack a methodological structure that can be reused.

Research limitations/implications

To constrain the complexity of this research at this first stage of investigation only the search criterion “business process improvement” was used in the database search (EBSCO and Emerald).

Originality/value

The paper is valuable for academics and practitioners because the impact of BPI on organizational performance is high. Its originality is in the structured evaluation of so‐called BPI approaches according to the MEM, which so far no one has investigated.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Delivering ITSM for Business Maturity: A Practical Framework
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-251-1

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2007

Peter Dalmaris, Eric Tsui, Bill Hall and Bob Smith

This paper aims to present research into the improvement of knowledge‐intensive business processes.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present research into the improvement of knowledge‐intensive business processes.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review is conducted that indicates that a gap exists in the area of knowledge‐based business process improvement (KBPI). Sir Karl Popper's theory of objective knowledge is used as a conceptual basis for the design of a business process improvement (BPI) framework. Case studies are conducted to evaluate and further evolve the improvement framework in two different organisations.

Findings

Highlights the gap in the literature. Draws attention to the merits of KBPI. Reports on the design of an improvement framework for knowledge‐intensive business processes, and on the lessons learned from the conducted case studies.

Research limitations/implications

Practical and time constraints limit the scope of the case studies. General applicability can be inferred, but not tested, due to the small number of case studies.

Practical implications

A new practical way to achieve performance improvement, that utilises structured tools on intangible organisational assets. The framework can be applied by organisations that run knowledge‐intensive business processes.

Originality/value

This paper addresses a gap in the area of KBPI. It combines concepts from business process management with a robust theory of knowledge to design a practical improvement framework. The paper also contains interesting argumentation supporting the use of Karl Popper's epistemology in BPI and knowledge management.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

Christopher R. Jones

Discusses how Unisys Ltd in the UK and other leading companies arefinding that performance measuring and improving key business processesform a vital part of a…

Abstract

Discusses how Unisys Ltd in the UK and other leading companies are finding that performance measuring and improving key business processes form a vital part of a company‐wide improvement strategy. Using examples from Unisys, shows how cross‐functional methods of process improvement are being deployed to this end. Discusses the key business processes, breaking these down further into delivery and support processes. Looks at how to exploit the challenges and opportunities to be found in the 1990s and how to structure measuring, improving, planning and controlling the key business processes as part of a company‐wide strategy.

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Martin Lehnert, Alexander Linhart and Maximilian Roeglinger

Despite an obvious connection, business process improvement and business process management (BPM) capability development have been studied intensely, but in isolation. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite an obvious connection, business process improvement and business process management (BPM) capability development have been studied intensely, but in isolation. The authors thus aim to make the case for the research located at the intersection of both streams. The authors thereby focus on the integrated planning of business process improvement and BPM capability development as this is where, in the authors’ opinion, both streams have the closest interaction. The authors refer to the research field located at the intersection of business process improvement and BPM capability development as process project portfolio management. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors structure the field of process project portfolio management drawing from extant knowledge related to BPM, project portfolio management, and performance management. The authors also propose a research agenda in terms of exemplary research questions and research methods.

Findings

The proposed structure shows which business objects and interactions should be considered when engaging in process project portfolio management. The research agenda contains exemplary questions structured along the intersections of BPM, project portfolio management, and performance management.

Research limitations/implications

This paper’s main limitation is that it reflects the authors’ individual viewpoints based on experiences of several industry projects and prior research.

Originality/value

This paper addresses a neglected research field, opens up new avenues for interdisciplinary BPM research, and contributes a novel perspective to the ongoing discussion about the future of BPM.

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Gareth R.T. White and Svetlana Cicmil

Business improvement initiatives have benefit for both an organisation’s operational effectiveness and its knowledge acquisition capabilities. These have a synergistic…

Abstract

Purpose

Business improvement initiatives have benefit for both an organisation’s operational effectiveness and its knowledge acquisition capabilities. These have a synergistic effect upon the ability to gain and maintain competitive advantage. Among the multitude of approaches that can be adopted process mapping (PMapping) is widely used. The purpose of this paper is to examine the utilisation of PMapping for undertaking business process improvement and the resultant acquisition of knowledge among those that are involved in its performance and the subsequent use of process maps (PMaps).

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting the notion of " knowledge as knowing " and Activity Theory as the research framework, a four-year Participatory Action Research study of three organisations was conducted. Data were gathered through cyclically developed semi-structured interviews, on-site observation and instantaneously sampled field notes.

Findings

It finds that PMapping is a useful technique for conducting business process improvements and acquiring knowledge of organisations and their people. It also finds that PMaps are useful knowledge repositories that have value beyond aiding the development of improved business processes. Socialisation is a key determinant of knowledge coproduction and transfer. This study finds that it occurs in formal and informal modes between individuals engaged in PMapping.

Research limitations/implications

The choice of PMapping technique may have significant influence upon the knowledge that is acquired by individuals and organisations during business process improvement initiatives. Future research should explore the relationship between PMapping methods, their knowledge-generative potential and the usability of the resultant PMaps.

Practical implications

Organisations undertaking business process improvement initiatives should take account of those factors that mediate its undertaking and its knowledge-generative potential. The objectives of improvement initiatives and of specific activities such as PMapping need to be carefully considered. Changes in objectives need clear communication and justification, and the purpose and benefit of such changes must be weighed against the potential detrimental effect that they may have upon the workforce. Inconsiderate goals setting and changing can lead to individuals coming under significant psychological and sociological pressures.

Originality/value

This research furthers the understanding of knowledge acquisition and business process improvement in non-manufacturing environments. It identifies the challenges involved in adopting PMapping as a business improvement tool. It also provides insight into the use of the tool as a technique for fostering knowledge acquisition in individuals.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 65 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Nereu F. Kock and Robert J. McQueen

Much of the evaluative research on groupware in organizations sofar has been preoccupied with the role of groupware as a new interactionmedium to replace or extend…

Abstract

Much of the evaluative research on groupware in organizations so far has been preoccupied with the role of groupware as a new interaction medium to replace or extend face‐to‐face communication in groups. It has focused on gains and losses from a group interaction point of view, typically disregarding the impact of other functions such as group access, and contribution to information concerning the organization. Attempts to bridge this gap with an action research into the effects of the introduction of an asynchronous groupware system to support business process improvement groups in a service company based in Brazil. The research suggests that improvements in business redesign efficiency and effectiveness can be attained not only from asynchronous groupware support to group communication, but also from public sharing of historical information about previous business process improvement efforts, and by providing a repository of information about business processes which could be candidates for improvement. Concludes with the proposal of an explanatory model, describing the relationship between the introduction of technology, its integration with a business process improvement meta‐process, and its effects on the efficiency and effectiveness of that meta‐process.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1994

Eric Sandelands

Total quality management does improve organizational performance and remains the most viable long‐term business strategy around. These were the findings of arecent report…

Abstract

Total quality management does improve organizational performance and remains the most viable long‐term business strategy around. These were the findings of a recent report entitled “TQM: Forging a Need or Falling Behind?”, commissioned by Development Dimensions International of Pittsburgh, the Quality & Productivity Management Association of Schaumburg, Illinois, and Industry Week, which were based on interviews with 6,500 people in 84 organizations. However, on considering the various elements which help or hinder TQM implementation, training emerged as the one successful theme in successful programmes.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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