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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2021

Denise Bedford and Thomas W. Sanchez

This chapter focuses on business and industry networks. All six facets of knowledge networks are described. Three of the six facets have particular importance for these…

Abstract

Chapter Summary

This chapter focuses on business and industry networks. All six facets of knowledge networks are described. Three of the six facets have particular importance for these networks, specifically domain, relationships, and how messages are managed and controlled. The authors provide six network profiles, including health care industry networks, fashion industry networks, technology industry networks, food production industry networks, building industry networks, and transportation industry networks.

Details

Knowledge Networks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-949-9

Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2005

Magnar Forbord

In every industry there are resources. Some are moving, others more fixed; some are technical, others social. People working with the resources, for example, as buyers or…

Abstract

In every industry there are resources. Some are moving, others more fixed; some are technical, others social. People working with the resources, for example, as buyers or sellers, or users or producers, may not make much notice of them. A product sells. A facility functions. The business relationship in which we make our money has “always” been there. However, some times this picture of order is disturbed. A user having purchased a product for decades may “suddenly” say to the producer that s/he does not appreciate the product. And a producer having received an order of a product that s/he thought was well known, may find it impossible to sell it. Such disturbances may be ignored. Or they can be used as a platform for development. In this study we investigate the latter option, theoretically and through real world data. Concerning theory we draw on the industrial network approach. We see industrial actors as part of (industrial) networks. In their activities actors use and produce resources. Moreover, the actors interact − bilaterally and multilaterally. This leads to development of resources and networks. Through “thick” descriptions of two cases we illustrate and try to understand the interactive character of resource development and how actors do business on features of resources. The cases are about a certain type of resource, a product − goat milk. The main message to industrial actors is that they should pay attention to that products can be co-created. Successful co-creation of products, moreover, may require development also of business relationships and their connections (“networking”).

Details

Managing Product Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-311-2

Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2021

Denise Bedford and Thomas W. Sanchez

This chapter highlights the importance of strategically managing knowledge networks. Strategic management is defined as being aware of current knowledge networks

Abstract

Chapter Summary

This chapter highlights the importance of strategically managing knowledge networks. Strategic management is defined as being aware of current knowledge networks, understanding current knowledge stocks, and identifying gaps. It also involves assessing the knowledge needs of business units and ensuring that those needs are addressed. The chapter also highlights the importance of having a vision of a healthy knowledge network.

Details

Knowledge Networks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-949-9

Article
Publication date: 17 July 2020

Birgit Leick and Susanne Gretzinger

Research on business networks in organisationally thin regions, which are characterised by a low density and quality of business networks, is still in its infancy, while…

Abstract

Purpose

Research on business networks in organisationally thin regions, which are characterised by a low density and quality of business networks, is still in its infancy, while the facilitation of business networks receives increasing interest. The present paper combines both perspectives by investigating how different types of network brokers facilitate business networking and knowledge-sharing in organisationally thin regions.

Design/methodology/approach

Burt's theory on brokers in social networks is applied to knowledge-sharing in business networks for organisational thinness as context. A qualitative case study represents the empirical basis that describes network brokers from various domains in three different German case regions, which are characterised by organisational thinness.

Findings

The network brokers studied facilitate different types of business networks, and they use various levers to increase knowledge-sharing among companies in business networks. Two broker types emerge, private business-driven versus public policy-driven network brokers with distinct approaches to the facilitation of business networking and knowledge-sharing and different limitations due to organisational thinness.

Practical implications

Companies, notably SMEs, in contexts characterised by low networking density and quality may benefit from various types of network brokers that foster business networking and instigate knowledge exchange. Public policy should embed activities of private brokers in existing SME assistance programmes to increase the quantity and quality of business networks.

Originality/value

Network facilitation in regions with weaknesses in their endowment with industry clusters, business networks and innovative knowledge exchange is under-explored, and this paper contributes to shedding light on this topic with a case study.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Allan Butler, Matt Reed and Phil Le Grice

Vocational training by those involved in small land‐based businesses can lead to innovation as transferred knowledge may be applied to make marginal changes to enterprises…

1783

Abstract

Purpose

Vocational training by those involved in small land‐based businesses can lead to innovation as transferred knowledge may be applied to make marginal changes to enterprises or, in some cases, a major reorganisation of resources within a business. The purpose of this paper is to explore how knowledge is disseminated in personal business networks and how this is used in a very traditional industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A synthesis of three interrelated concepts, those of knowledge, social network structure and trust in relationships, provides the basis for a tripartite model of knowledge transfer. Through conducting in‐depth interviews, data are collected on each aspect of the model to map the structure of personal business networks, to provide qualitative data on the type of relationships that exist within these and to whom knowledge has been transferred.

Findings

The emphasis on innovation through loose ties or the role of the outsider may not be an appropriate model for small land‐based business. With the pre‐dominance of strong ties and low flows of information, these businesses are unlikely to change either quickly or easily. Radical changes to business structure imply a more costly and focused intervention than the current emphasis on project and programme based support for rural businesses.

Research limitations/implications

Creating a snapshot of knowledge transfer occurring in small land‐based businesses provides valuable insights into the flows of information within a business and how training is deployed. However, a longitudinal study would deepen understanding of how cumulative knowledge transfer is practically implemented.

Originality/value

Applying social network analysis to small businesses to examine knowledge transfer is in itself innovative, particularly as the research draws upon a peer‐group of businesses enabling some comparisons to be made.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Byoungho Jin and Sojin Jung

The purpose of this paper is to, built upon Johanson and Vahlne’s (2009) Business Network Internationalization Process Model, explore the role of personal networks and…

1307

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to, built upon Johanson and Vahlne’s (2009) Business Network Internationalization Process Model, explore the role of personal networks and business networks and their impact on foreign market knowledge and performance among small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) after international market entry.

Design/methodology/approach

With a total mailing list of 2,250 US firms, data were collected via a mail survey in accordance with the methods of Dillman et al. (2008).

Findings

An empirical analysis of 105 SME cases revealed that business networks increased foreign market knowledge, which in turn also heightened the international performance of the SMEs. This confirmed the mediating role of market knowledge between business networks and international performance. Personal networks, however, provided little support in helping SMEs achieve foreign market knowledge and international performance.

Originality/value

This study contributes unique empirical evidence demonstrating that business network internationalization models can be applicable to the context of SMEs; that is, having access to such a network (i.e. a business network) is found to be a critical factor of international performance.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Valerie A. Bell and Sarah Y. Cooper

Business networks are of critical importance to firms and essential to the internationalisation of born-global and international new venture firms. Networking literature…

Abstract

Business networks are of critical importance to firms and essential to the internationalisation of born-global and international new venture firms. Networking literature focuses on what are, generally, co-operative relationships and their effects between actors, activities and resources and illustrate the importance of quality and change in the networking process. Utilising Fletcher and Harris’ (2012) framework for understanding knowledge acquisition processes in internationalisation, this study investigates the importance of direct and indirect roles played by third parties in the networking for internationalisation processes of three different firm types within the knowledge-based natural health products (NHPs) (pharmaceutical) sector in Canada. The research presented here examines nine case studies of Canadian NHP firms and reveals that they utilised all network-related internationalisation processes simultaneously to internationalise including Johanson and Mattsson’s (1988, 1994) network theory, Johanson and Vahlne’s (2003) updated the Uppsala Model and the resource-based perspective on network theory (Ruzzier et al., 2006). They networked with and extensively utilised third parties, including government bodies, trade associations, government advisors, consultants and other domestic networks with international ties, in Canada and internationally to gain technical, market and internationalisation knowledge, and direct and indirect experiential knowledge which contributed to the internationalisation process confirming the study by Fletcher and Harris (2012). In a departure from the literature, this study found that weak ties (Granovetter, 1973) developed with third parties who were new to the networks allowed the NHP firms to develop competitive advantages necessary for them to overcome the liability of outsidership in entering new international markets. The type of technical, market and internationalisation knowledge gained, its content and the direct and indirect sources of knowledge from third parties were all shown to contribute to the internationalisation process.

Details

New Technology-Based Firms in the New Millennium
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-032-6

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2020

Michelle McLeod

The purpose of this paper is to reveal those attributes of owners and managers that influence knowledge flows between owners and managers in a tourism destination network

336

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reveal those attributes of owners and managers that influence knowledge flows between owners and managers in a tourism destination network. The research question relates to whether homogeneity and/or heterogeneity attributes of the owners and managers are associated with the flow of information within a knowledge network.

Design/methodology/approach

Owners and managers of tourism and hospitality businesses in the Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch conurbation were surveyed regarding their receipt of information from each other. Social network analysis (SNA) was applied to understand how job position, type of business, gender and education attributes influence the information flows within a knowledge network.

Findings

It was revealed that the ties or flows of information were influenced through the heterogeneity of the type of education attribute of a business owner or manager. Other attributes such as type of business, job position or gender were not associated with the receipt of information.

Research limitations/implications

The contribution of the paper relates to increasing the understanding of an underlying attribute that influences information flows between owners and managers of tourism and hospitality businesses within a tourism destination.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the understanding of a heterogeneous attribute that influences the flow of information within a tourism destination network.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 3 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 November 2019

Ricardo Vinícius Dias Jordão, Jorge Novas and Vipin Gupta

This paper aims to analyze the role of a knowledge-based network (k-network) in the intellectual capital (IC) and organizational performance of Brazilian small and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the role of a knowledge-based network (k-network) in the intellectual capital (IC) and organizational performance of Brazilian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a descriptive, qualitative and applied case study, developed taking into account the theories of strategy, IC, networks and finance to analyze the relationship between k-network and the generation of IC and organizational performance in a multifocal perspective (observed in terms of financial and marketing results, efficiency and efficacy and innovation and competitiveness) in Brazilian SMEs.

Findings

The findings showed that k-network plays a crucial role in the generation of the IC and improvements in organizational performance in SMEs. In addition, the results revealed the strategic relevance of the relationship between people and enterprises to master the process of creation and sharing information and knowledge in the analyzed network. Taken as a whole, the conclusions demonstrated the establishment of IC (in its three dimensions) as a consequence of the strategic association of SMEs in k-network, as well as the mediation role of IC as a way to promote improvements in organizational performance, considering the observed amelioration in financial results, marketing growth, efficiency, efficacy, innovation and competitiveness.

Research limitations/implications

This research provides theoretical contributions by broadening knowledge of the practical relationship between k-network, IC and the multifocal perspective of SMEs organizational performance – a relevant and underexplored issue in the literature, offering several avenues for future research.

Practical implications

The results highlight the economic, political and social relevance of SMEs and the strategic use of k-network to overcome SMEs organizational, financial and managerial difficulties. In such context, analysts, managers, businesspeople and other decision-makers are expected to use this type of network to improve the IC, in its human, relational and structural dimensions, mastering companies’ knowledge and sustainable organizational performance.

Originality/value

The paper fills a significant research gap, revealing how k-networks can and should be used as a deliberate strategy by SMEs to create, acquire, use, absorb and share information and knowledge, as well as to generate IC, thus providing organizational, financial, innovative and competitive benefits to these enterprises and their network.

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Merrill Warkentin, Ravi Bapna and Vijayan Sugumaran

Evaluates the increase in inter‐ and intra‐organizational knowledge sharing capabilities brought about by the Internet‐driven “new economy” technologies and the resulting…

3166

Abstract

Evaluates the increase in inter‐ and intra‐organizational knowledge sharing capabilities brought about by the Internet‐driven “new economy” technologies and the resulting managerial implications. Presents a framework for evaluating and deploying such technologies. Firms employing knowledge networks can also use e‐knowledge to improve organizational decision making, react more quickly to changes in the economic landscape, and create dynamic custom content and consumer intimacy. Builds on the extensive literature in knowledge management and inter‐organizational systems by identifying the opportunities of each in creating “e‐knowledge networks” to support organizational collaboration. This framework is applied to four industry case studies – supply chain management networks, adserver networks, content syndication networks, and business‐to‐business exchange networks. Analysis suggests that in the new economy, characterized by ubiquitous and often automated information sharing capabilities, the ability to create knowledge‐based networks of partners will be critical to maintaining competitive advantage.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 14 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

Keywords

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