Search results

1 – 10 of over 44000
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

A.J. Faria

The growth and usage of business games in management trainingprogrammes and university business courses are examined. It is concludedthat usage is quite high in both, and…

Abstract

The growth and usage of business games in management training programmes and university business courses are examined. It is concluded that usage is quite high in both, and those unfamiliar with this instructional method are encouraged to find out what simulation gaming is about.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1990

D. Sculli and K.C. Hau

Many graduates, especially those in the more practical disciplines such as engineering and social science, often take up employment in a manufacturing or service…

Abstract

Many graduates, especially those in the more practical disciplines such as engineering and social science, often take up employment in a manufacturing or service enterprise, doing work of a managerial/administrative nature. Even recent graduates will often find themselves managing a sub‐system of an organisation such as materials purchasing, finished stocks, or quality control. This is particularly true in the smaller companies of the developing countries, where the graduate is usually one of a few professional employees reporting directly to the owners.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

Chaipong Pongpanich, Tanasak Krabuanrat and Kim Hua Tan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and gain insights into the use of computer simulations and games in business schools in Thailand. In addition, it aims to

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and gain insights into the use of computer simulations and games in business schools in Thailand. In addition, it aims to compare the findings in Thailand with the study carried out in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 700 questionnaires were sent to the 35 universities in Thailand that offer MBA degrees. This survey achieved a response rate of 23 percent.

Findings

The usage of simulation games in business schools in Thailand is still at an early stage of development. The primary reason to use such tools in both Thailand and the UK is that they help to increase students' interaction and teamwork. Meanwhile, lack of information on simulation games is major obstacle of using simulation games in their classroom teaching. However, the demand for computer simulations and games in the classroom is likely to increase in the future.

Research limitation/implications

The study provides good platform for further in‐depth study on this topic in Thailand. As for practical implication, it suggests a need for more collaboration between industry and academia so that simulation games will be developed to fit with the teaching courses.

Originality/value

This study highlights the key factors underpinning the usage of these new tools in classroom teaching in the Thai context.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2022

JiaChun Chen, Liangziye Tang, Honghong Tian, Ruiqiu Ou, Jingan Wang and Quan Chen

During the current global epidemic, e-learning and mobile learning have been rapidly developed in the field of entrepreneurship education. The effect of these learning…

Abstract

Purpose

During the current global epidemic, e-learning and mobile learning have been rapidly developed in the field of entrepreneurship education. The effect of these learning methods remains to be confirmed. The purpose of this paper is to explore the effect of mobile business simulation games in entrepreneurship education.

Design/methodology/approach

From May 2020 to July 2020, the authors adopted a quasi-experimental design to explore the effect of mobile business simulation games in entrepreneurship education. The authors set up an experimental group to participate in mobile business simulation games, with a total of 105 students, and set up a control group of 100 students. At the beginning and end of the experiment, data on entrepreneurial attitude, self-efficacy, entrepreneurial intention and other related variables were collected. Paired sample T-test and regression analysis were used to analyze the results.

Findings

The authors found that mobile business simulation games can improve entrepreneurial attitudes and self-efficacy, but cannot change entrepreneurial intentions. The paired sample T-test in the experimental group showed that the entrepreneurial attitude and entrepreneurial self-efficacy of the participants were significantly improved, but the entrepreneurial intention did not change significantly. The above three variables did not change significantly in the control group. The research results also show that flow experience is very important in mobile business simulation games, which can improve entrepreneurial attitude and entrepreneurial self-efficacy.

Originality/value

The authors’ findings confirm the positive effects of mobile business simulation games in entrepreneurship education, which can improve entrepreneurial attitudes and entrepreneurial self-efficacy. But the disadvantage of mobile business simulation games is that they cannot increase entrepreneurial intention. In addition, the flow experience needs to be valued in mobile business simulation games. The research in this paper has implications for how mobile learning can be used in entrepreneurship education during the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, research is of great value on how mobile business simulation games can be improved.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Vic Gilgeous and Mirabelle D’Cruz

Summarizes what business and management games are, their history, the different types of games that are available and what their uses are. Through interviews and a…

2382

Abstract

Summarizes what business and management games are, their history, the different types of games that are available and what their uses are. Through interviews and a questionnaire survey the users of games are studied to ascertain who they are, why they use or are involved with games and what they think of them.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Bernard Keys

Business games are often more costly and require more effort to implement than traditional programmes. However they are rapidly gaining favour as management development…

Abstract

Business games are often more costly and require more effort to implement than traditional programmes. However they are rapidly gaining favour as management development tools. Games incorporate a case history of the relevant industry and organisation; a set of realistic rules guiding business decisions; a computerised mathematical model which simulates a dynamic market. They offer possibilities for experiential learning in strategic planning and policy making, functional integration, financial analysis and control, team planning, “what if” analysis and interpersonal behavioural training. Games allow managers to experience failure without personal or organisational consequences. Methods of administering a game are explained and the learning process discussed. Case histories of game use in the Southwest Mat Processing Corporation Headquarters, the Southern Chemical Company and educational establishments in Honolulu are described. Emerging trends are discussed.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Teemu Laine, Jari Paranko and Petri Suomala

The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential benefits of a business game on customers’ business in enhancing servitization. The concept is proposed to be helpful…

2814

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential benefits of a business game on customers’ business in enhancing servitization. The concept is proposed to be helpful in the phases of defining the servitization initiative and gaining shared understanding about it at a manufacturer.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a longitudinal case study at a manufacturer (2003‐2008), with a focus on the business game concept on customers’ business. The researchers and approximately 140 company representatives contributed to both early and later phases of the development of the concept.

Findings

The business game concept appeared to serve the purpose of generating and sharing ideas about the customers’ business and the desired role of the OEM in it, as a potential outcome of servitization. The concept synthesizes the previously fragmented customer awareness across the business units and provides useful information for various stakeholders. The presence of personnel across the different business units and from a key customer company in the game events enabled new types of discussion related to the servitization initiative.

Research limitations/implications

The concept presented in this paper represents a potential tool for enhancing a servitization initiative. Due to the limitations of the case, the findings are tentative and primarily transferrable to contexts where a manufacturer provides machinery for industrial production. Moreover, the ability of the concept to capture real‐life customer values is critical for success and thus should be carefully examined.

Originality/value

The case study enables an in‐depth view of the phenomena under examination. Moreover, due to the researchers’ interventions in developing and using the concept, they observed actual processes of overcoming the challenges of servitization.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

A. Gonen, E. Brill and M. Frank

The purpose of this research paper is to explore the interrelations between success in the Business Games course and other MSc courses, and the parameters that influence

1427

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research paper is to explore the interrelations between success in the Business Games course and other MSc courses, and the parameters that influence success in managing firms in business games.

Design/methodology/approach

The research sample was comprised of graduate students from the Management of Technology faculty at Holon Institute of Technology. They study courses in the program, including the Business Games course. Special business game software, named Decision Makers, was used for the analyses. Statistical analyses of the interrelations among different program courses cover the main purpose. After defining five success criteria, statistical analyses of success and failure are presented.

Findings

In this course, success was generally uncorrelated with other courses. The reason for this was probably due to its project‐based learning (PBL) environment. The study shows that students tend to reduce their efforts across time and improve their performance, due to the “learning curve”. Analysis of the results shows that when teams overused the simulation runs, they do not analyze their situation, but rather prefer the “trial and error” method.

Research limitations/implications

The present study provides results about the importance of training managers through using the business game simulator.

Originality/value

Using PBL is very exiting for those students who have difficulties in classroom studies. By using PBL, these students rapidly improve their management skills.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Erno Vanhala, Jussi Kasurinen and Kari Smolander

The purpose of this paper is to identify the peculiarity of computer game organizations and their human resources. It presents a stage model including four phases covering…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the peculiarity of computer game organizations and their human resources. It presents a stage model including four phases covering the growth from demo group to full business. This study extends the research on how computer game organizations are formed and what it takes them to grow to financially self-sufficient. The study also broadens the understanding of the beginning phase of an organization.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilizes the grounded theory research method with 34 interview sessions among 11 computer game organizations. The interviewed persons include chief executive officers, designers and developers.

Findings

This paper presents empirical findings on what a computer game organization go through when they evolve from demo group phase, which is not discussed in existing literature, to full business. The authors observed that the core team is formed over a game designer and one or more developers. The team fortifies as the organization moves onwards to next phases. At the same time its reliance on partners and outsourcing changes to need based.

Research limitations/implications

As this is a qualitative study the observations are directly applicable only in the context of observed organizations. In the other context they are merely suggestions.

Practical implications

The study presents concrete growth model that can be utilized when building a computer game organization.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates the specialty of computer game organizations and their growth process. It also presents discussion of the beginning phase of organizations.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Kenneth Børgesen, Rikke Kirstine Nielsen and Thomas Duus Henriksen

This paper aims to address the necessity of allowing non-formal and informal processes to unfold when using business games for leadership development. While games and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address the necessity of allowing non-formal and informal processes to unfold when using business games for leadership development. While games and simulations have long been used in management training and leadership development, emphasis has been placed on the formal parts of the process and especially on the gaming experience.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a qualitative study of a French management game on change management, in which the game-based learning process is examined in light of adult learning.

Findings

This paper concludes that less formal dialogues that stem from formal activities make important contributions to the learning process. Consequently, the use of business games in leadership development should be didactically designed to facilitate such dialogues. While playing the game takes center stage, activities such as theory presentations, reflective processes, and less formal discussions must be allowed a place in an otherwise crammed learning process and to take up that space at the cost of playing the game.

Research limitations/implications

As the study is based on a qualitative assessment, the impact of the different parts of the process is not assessed.

Practical implications

This paper suggests that the use of business games in leadership development should focus more on the processes and activities surrounding the game rather than narrowly focusing on the game.

Originality/value

This paper suggests a novel approach to using business games that is not aligned with the current practice of emphasizing the game as the focal point of the process.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 44000