Search results

1 – 10 of over 110000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Patrick Griffis

The purpose of this paper is to provide examples and best practices of an academic library’s strategy of collaborating with community agencies in assisting community

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide examples and best practices of an academic library’s strategy of collaborating with community agencies in assisting community entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper reflects on the evolution of a new service role for an academic library in providing outreach to community entrepreneurs and is limited to the best practices and lessons learned of one academic library.

Findings

This conceptual paper reflects on an academic library’s outreach strategy for assisting community entrepreneurs; collaboration with community agencies is featured as a best practice with examples and lessons learned.

Originality/value

A recent national study of academic business librarians’ outreach to entrepreneurs has established collaboration with community agencies as an effective service strategy. This conceptual paper reflects on the use of this strategy in a specific academic library’s outreach efforts to community entrepreneurs.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Annie Booth, Sinead Earley, Kyle Aben, Barbara Otter, Todd Corrigal and Christie Ray

The purpose of this paper is to discuss an innovative course offered as a partnership between the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) (Canada), the Prince…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss an innovative course offered as a partnership between the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) (Canada), the Prince George Chamber of Commerce (Canada) and local businesses: UNBC’s third-year undergraduate/graduate course, carbon and energy management.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have all participated in the development, design and/or delivery of the course and have provided their reflections on the experience. In addition, they sought insights from students and other interested people on the impact and significance of this course.

Findings

Carbon and energy management is an action learning-based co-created course initiated by the Chamber to address an interest in mitigating climate change amongst local businesses. Among businesses, the carbon economy is under considerable discussion. The increased awareness of climate change, and the need to better manage carbon, has led to local businesses eager to reduce greenhouse gases but lacking the expertise necessary. UNBC students (undergraduate and graduate) learn innovative and practical skills through creating carbon footprint analyses for small- to medium-sized business/non-profit clients, providing recommendations on reducing reliance on fossil fuels and formally presenting their findings to their clients. After five years, 46 businesses and non-profit organizations have participated in the course along with over 30 students and 5 separately hired student interns. The Chamber is now rolling out the program for Canadian Chamber of Commerce interested in similar community–university partnerships.

Originality/value

This paper describes a course that is a novel approach to university–community partnerships, both in approach and focus area. The linking, through the course, of small- to medium-sized businesses with the provision of plans for carbon reduction developed by university students is an unusual approach. However, there is significant value to all partners in the approach. Allowing the main community partner to serve as the lead in the project also offers an unusual experience and perspective for the university partner, as often such partnerships are largely driven by the post-secondary institution’s interests and needs, which can create a challenging power dynamic. Instead, the course offers a lesson in how a university can be clearly in service to the community at the community’s invitation. Finally, this paper offers reflections on the value of this type of project for creating sustainability initiatives from the perspective of all participants, students, faculty, university administration, city government, participating businesses and the Chamber of Commerce, demonstrating the critical need for understanding a project as an intersection of all participating actors.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Lynne Siemens

Community economic development (CED) focuses on the creation of sustainable communities. To that end, a reciprocal relationship that sustains the community and business

Abstract

Purpose

Community economic development (CED) focuses on the creation of sustainable communities. To that end, a reciprocal relationship that sustains the community and business alike can be created. However, little is known about the nature of informal interactions between residents and businesses that achieves that end. This study aims to explore the nature of these interactions and their contribution to CED within a rural context.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was used with interviews with five rural entrepreneurs. Questions explored the nature of the support that they receive from their home community and their contributions back to it.

Findings

The results show that communities and businesses do not operate independently of each other, but rather are mutually supportive and contribute directly to the other’s objectives. These relationships are reinforced over time by a business owner’s direct involvement in the community, though this process takes time and effort.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses on a limited geographical area in British Columbia with a small group of rural entrepreneurs. The results may not be generalizable to other contexts.

Practical implications

The results suggest concrete actions that both the rural entrepreneurs and their associated communities can take to be mutually supportive of each other to the benefit of each party alike.

Originality/value

This paper enlarges the understanding of the types of interactions, especially informal ones, that can support both businesses and the larger community in their efforts to sustain themselves and contribute to CED efforts.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Robert J. Tosterud

Economic development as a public initiative is traditionally designed to assist designated members of a society in their efforts to adjust to structural change and…

Abstract

Economic development as a public initiative is traditionally designed to assist designated members of a society in their efforts to adjust to structural change and economic dislocation. The goal of a typical economic development program, while a public interventionist initiative, is to stimulate private sector economic activity, thereby alleviating the stress and damage associated with structural change and economic dislocation; in other words, to help fellow citizens and perhaps neighbours through an economic transition. These are honourable and worthy goals, but even here compassion, empathy, innovative thinking, and resources — especially resources — have their limits.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Anne Therese Macdonald

The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not a dedicated business center within a public library acts as a key success factor in a public library’s services to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not a dedicated business center within a public library acts as a key success factor in a public library’s services to the community entrepreneur.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was sent to 88 public libraries with dedicated business centers, and posted to BRASS-L and BUSLIB-L, for input from public libraries without business centers. Interviews with three survey respondents and one local city official followed.

Findings

Fifty-seven per cent of all respondents felt that a dedicated business center is very essential or essential to the services provided to the entrepreneurial community. The services most often offered were workshops/seminars/classes, counseling sessions by collaborative agencies and one-on-one research sessions with librarians. The majority of responding libraries collaborated with a community business agency (80 per cent). Fifty-one per cent spend between 6 and 20 hours/month on the collaboration.

Research limitations/implications

Since 2007, many of the dedicated business centers in public libraries have closed or been consolidated with other sections and services of a public library. This should be further studied. Further research on librarian expertise in market and industry research is recommended.

Originality/value

This study updates the business services associated with public libraries business services since the push in the late 1990s for public libraries to be more active in community economic development.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Greg MacLeod, Bruce McFarlane and Charles H. Davis

Posits that most contemporary interest in the university‐industry linkages stems from a concern to increase the birth rate of new technology‐based firms and/or the…

Abstract

Posits that most contemporary interest in the university‐industry linkages stems from a concern to increase the birth rate of new technology‐based firms and/or the velocity with which indigenous scientific capability is translated into commercial technologies. Notes that many analysts of science parks and silicon valleys argue that this kind of knowledge‐based innovation requires cosmopolitan economic and social milieux with good communication links, easy access to air transport, highly educated workers and sophisticated cultural amenities. Argues that on the receiving end of contemporary innovation systems are indigenous and other disempowered groups and economically depleted communities with little stake in scientific and technical advancement and virtually no involvement in the policy or social networks set up to steer the knowledge system. Describes an experiment to discover processes by which marginalized, economically distressed communities can use institutions of the “knowledge economy” to foster the social and technological innovation necessary for their survival. Joins the University College of Cape Breton with universities in Mexico to form structured relationships with communities on Cape Breton Island and with a Mayan community on the Yucatán Peninsula. Bases techniques on searching for economic opportunities, construction of community business organizations, training, community development and supportive aftercare services to provide the three components of community economic regeneration: finance, technology and formation. Works to find ways to use the dynamics of triple helix innovation to construct knowledge systems that work in favour of the peripheral communities threatened by trade liberalization and the decline of resource regions. Specifically asks how can the institutions of the “knowledge economy” contribute to the development of a local sub‐economy that supports local businesses? Employs a social economy approach to the establishment of community businesses, differing from others in the community business movement in the belief that the “knowledge economy” can provide resources and eventual economic and social survivability to distressed regions. Argues that economic regeneration among marginal groups requires: access to improved production and organizational technologies; that universities can provide this access, especially in distressed communities; a transfer system usually has to be established; specific steps must be taken to establish new community businesses; and a maintenance system with specific characteristics must be established.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 24 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

George Okello Candiya Bongomin, John C. Munene, Joseph Mpeera Ntayi and Charles Akol Malinga

The purpose of this paper is to test the interaction effect of government support in the relationship between business skills, capital adequacy, access to finance, access…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the interaction effect of government support in the relationship between business skills, capital adequacy, access to finance, access to market, entrepreneurial education, and small, medium, and micro enterprises (SMMEs) survival in post-war communities in Northern Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional research design was used in the study and quantitative data were collected from 304 SMMEs located in Gulu District using a semi-structured questionnaire. Structural equation modeling (SEM) through the use of analysis of moment structures was adopted to establish the interaction effect of government support in the relationship between business skills, capital adequacy, access to finance, access to market, entrepreneurial education, and SMMEs survival in post-war communities in Northern Uganda. Furthermore, Pearson’s correlation analysis was used to show the association between the variables under study.

Findings

The results revealed that there is a significant interaction effect of government support in the relationship between business skills, capital adequacy, access to finance, access to market, entrepreneurial education, and SMMEs survival in post-war communities in Northern Uganda. Besides, the results indicated that business skills, capital adequacy, access to finance, access to market, entrepreneurial education, and government support have significant and positive impacts on SMMEs survival in post-war communities in Northern Uganda.

Research limitations/implications

The study employed cross-sectional research design, thus, ignoring longitudinal study approach. Besides, the sample was selected from only Gulu District, therefore, leaving out other Districts located in Northern Uganda.

Practical implications

Advocates of recovery programs and interventions in developing countries should consider government support as a vital factor in promoting business skill, capital adequacy, access to finance, access to market, and entrepreneurial education in order to enhance SMMEs growth in post-war communities. In addition, governments in developing countries should offer investment incentives and tax waivers to infant SMMEs in post-war communities like in Northern Uganda.

Originality/value

The study examined the interaction effect of government support in the relationship between business skills, capital adequacy, access to finance, access to market, entrepreneurial education, and SMMEs survival in post-war communities in developing countries. Thus, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first attempt to test the interaction effect of government support in the relationship between business skills, capital adequacy, access to finance, access to market, entrepreneurial education, and SMMEs survival in post-war communities in Northern Uganda. The use of government support as a moderator in the relationship between business skills, capital adequacy, access to finance, access to market, entrepreneurial education, and SMMEs survival is scarce in entrepreneurship literature and theory. This creates uniqueness in this study.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Louise Lee

This paper aims to offer a New Zealand perspective on how business and community organisations engage to develop mutually beneficial partnerships to tackle pressing social

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to offer a New Zealand perspective on how business and community organisations engage to develop mutually beneficial partnerships to tackle pressing social issues. Specifically, the paper seeks to examine the collaboration motivations for business and community partners involved in seven businesscommunity partnerships in New Zealand.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilises data from in‐depth, semi‐structured interviews with key business and community managers involved in seven partnerships in New Zealand. The transcripts of the interviews were analysed using elements of content and narrative analysis. Findings to be presented in this paper include: explaining what “partnership” is; understanding a business case; and community organisations' motivations for engaging in partnerships with business.

Findings

This research finds that, while partnerships involving business and community organisations may ideally be associated with shared societal concerns, in this study there was a very strong focus on individual community organisation goals and a dominance of business priorities. This was not balanced by an interest in the broader meta‐goals of the partnership.

Originality/value

This paper draws attention to diverse and often competing motivations that characterise businesscommunity partnerships. The research demonstrates that, while partnerships are often discussed in the context of societal benefits, individual organisations frequently form partnerships primarily for their own instrumental self‐interests. It is hoped that this paper will stimulate understanding of the practical challenges to developing businesscommunity partnerships, given differences among the partners in goal orientations and expectations.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Christine Armstrong, Kate Ramberan and K.G.B. Bakewell

The implications of the Single European Market for libraries andinformation services are considered with some examples of what is beingdone. After a general introduction…

Abstract

The implications of the Single European Market for libraries and information services are considered with some examples of what is being done. After a general introduction to 1992, the Plan of Action for Libraries in the EC is considered and the library implications of the five Action Lines. The roles of European Documentation Centres, EC Depository Libraries, European Reference Centres; Euro Information Centres and online databases are considered, together with developments in co‐operation and also the human implications.

Details

Library Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Zilia Iskoujina, Malgorzata Ciesielska, Joanne Roberts and Feng Li

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the definitions, dimensions, and classifications of online communities together with their potential to produce value for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the definitions, dimensions, and classifications of online communities together with their potential to produce value for business. Those value options are then discussed in the context of empirical vignettes showing examples of business models focussed on one of the two potential benefits coming from online communities – clear financial gains and intangible long-run returns.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses systematic literature review method. In total, 67 academic paper in the area of business and management were chosen for the analysis.

Findings

The literature review shows multitude of online communities definitions and classifications, but hardly any comprehensive attempt to map the phenomena in full. This paper is looking into recognising potential revenue streams from online businesses and other non-financial benefits that can be combined to create strong and sustainable value proposition.

Originality/value

Drawing on the literature reviewed a novel categorisation of the commercial opportunities offered by the online communities is presented. These opportunities are discussed in a context of business model design.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 110000