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Article

Peter Daly

The purpose of this paper is to position the business apprenticeship model (a work-based learning model where student managers alternate between academic and workplace…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to position the business apprenticeship model (a work-based learning model where student managers alternate between academic and workplace learning) at a political, institutional and student level in order to explain how it fits within the French business education landscape and how it is considered as a viable business model in management education.

Design/methodology/approach

Business apprenticeship is analysed through the prism of Osterwalder and Pigneur’s (2010) Business Model Canvas to evaluate the nine dimensions of the business model: customer segments, value proposition, customer channels, customer relationships, revenue streams, key resources, key activities, key partners and cost structure.

Findings

Two major advantages of the model are identified, namely, the potential for widening participation and affordability and three concerns are outlined: the corporate vision of the apprentice, the recent governmental reforms on funding this model, and the potential synergies between theory and practice.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is useful for all those who wish to develop an apprenticeship track within their business schools and for employers who are considering the development of apprenticeship partnerships with business schools.

Originality/value

This paper provides insight into business apprenticeship as a work-based learning model.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article

Tim Riley

The purpose of this paper is to identify the needs and receptiveness of the creative industry sectors, in particular small and micro businesses, in respect of the adoption…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the needs and receptiveness of the creative industry sectors, in particular small and micro businesses, in respect of the adoption and development of degree apprenticeships. In addition, the paper aims to identify employers' barriers to entry into such programmes.

Design/methodology/approach

Due to the lack of knowledge of degree apprenticeships, an ‘explain and respond’ method was adopted, where a comprehensive explanation of degree apprenticeships and the process for delivery was given to respondents. This enabled them to ask questions and give informed and knowledgeable response to interview questions.

Findings

Participants in this research were generally positive about the integration and adoption of degree apprenticeships into their businesses. However, they suggest that the rigid procedure set by the Institute for Apprenticeships makes embarking on the process of developing standards and adopting degree apprenticeships difficult, time-consuming and impracticable for businesses of their size and in these sectors. This has implications for addressing skills shortages and diversity that stands to endanger the continued success of the creative industries.

Originality/value

Little research has been conducted into the viability of degree apprenticeships for creative industries, particularly non-levy paying small and micro businesses.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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Article

Rod Kenyon

This paper seeks to present the Apprenticeships Task Force's (ATF's) evaluation of the business case for recruiting and training apprentices. The focus is on whether they…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to present the Apprenticeships Task Force's (ATF's) evaluation of the business case for recruiting and training apprentices. The focus is on whether they provide employers in the UK with a positive return on investment in key performance areas.

Design/methodology/approach

The ATF asked nine members, senior executives of large and smaller companies across various sectors in the economy, to provide evidence that their apprentices add value to business performance. Their information was based on company research, including financial and other performance data comparing apprentices with non‐apprentices.

Findings

The case studies provide compelling evidence that apprenticeships deliver strong business benefits such as increased productivity and staff retention, reduced costs and a more diverse workforce. Other benefits include: increased profits – BT estimated they gained a higher annual net profit of over £1,300 per apprentice when compared with non‐apprentices; higher quality of work – at BAE Systems apprentices fulfilled tasks correctly at a rate of 85 per cent right first time after completing their training; external recruits had a rate of 60 per cent; and career progression – over 90 per cent of line managers in British Gas's engineering operations trained as apprentices.

Originality/value

The case studies offer employers without apprentices a real insight into the apprentices’ enhancement of skills within an economy. They also provide a unique contribution to the body of knowledge used to assess the value of apprenticeships to employers.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 47 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article

Heinz Weihrich, Kai‐Uwe Seidenfuss and Volker Goebel

Introduces the traditional German apprenticeship training approach which has been received favourably in US governments (federal and state) and in industry, but suggests…

Abstract

Introduces the traditional German apprenticeship training approach which has been received favourably in US governments (federal and state) and in industry, but suggests that certain conditions in America do not favour heavy investment in such training. Shows that the educational transfer of the apprenticeship model may be facilitated by German firms investing and operating in the United States, as proved by the electronic giant Siemens which is committed to implementing the proven apprenticeship model in its US subsidiaries. Shows that the apprenticeship model alone may be insufficient, and may need to be supplemented by a higher level, dual system education which integrates theory and practice. Proposes that the Vocational Academy programme, illustrated by the Mercedes‐Benz experience, may fill this gap ‐ not to supplant the apprenticeship training, but to supplement it. Suggests that both the apprenticeship model and the Vocational Academy model, may fill an important need for an educational joint venture approach, not only in the United States but also in other countries, by making business and government organizations more competitive in the global market.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 96 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Indigenous African Enterprise
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-033-2

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Article

Dionne Lee

Apprenticeships in England are currently experiencing a revival. The purpose of this paper is to provide a general overview of apprenticeships in England, examine current…

Abstract

Purpose

Apprenticeships in England are currently experiencing a revival. The purpose of this paper is to provide a general overview of apprenticeships in England, examine current government policy, and explore current issues around the further development of apprenticeships.

Design/methodology/approach

Desk research, including reviewing other research articles and labour market intelligence has been carried out to provide a general overview of the issues.

Findings

Apprenticeships have traditionally been regarded as the vocational route to stable employment. Although they have sometimes suffered from a poor reputation they are now becoming an increasingly popular option for both younger and older people. The knowledge economy is driving up the demand for higher level skills and concurrent with this is the notion that, in today's competitive labour market, experience is vital. Not only has this impacted on the popularity of apprenticeships but also upon more traditional “academic” routes such as higher education (HE). In addition it has raised questions about higher level skills and vocational education. The introduction of Higher Apprenticeships and work experience/real world interactions built into HE courses are establishing synergies between the two elements of the skills/education system; however, developing these synergies further is a critical issue for future consideration.

Originality/value

There is a proliferation of publications tracking the nature and value of apprenticeships. This paper traces apprenticeships and their evolution and examines how practices adopted can be applied to newer vocational options being integrated into HE. The paper considers apprenticeships and other vocational options, building on the author's own discussions with employers and recent graduates.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article

Stan Lester

The purpose of this paper is to report on a study funded by the Edge Foundation, an independent educational charity, to investigate what is needed in order for English…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a study funded by the Edge Foundation, an independent educational charity, to investigate what is needed in order for English higher education to operate degree apprenticeships (DAs) on a sustainable basis.

Design/methodology/approach

The study, conducted in 2019–2020, took the form of a literature review, semi-structured interviews with employers, institutional staff members and apprentices in three fields, and an open online survey.

Findings

This study illustrates a high level of support for DAs amongst those who are involved in them, whether as educators, employers or apprentices. Degree Apprenticeships aid public-sector recruitment, support progression routes and social mobility within the existing workforce, and contribute to recruitment and productivity in public services and economically critical industries. Practices in the organisation and delivery of apprenticeships are variable, but a clear need is illustrated for strong institution–employer partnerships, integration between on- and off-the-job learning, expansive workplace learning environments, and co-ordination of assessment and quality assurance. There is also a need for external bodies to provide a consistent policy and funding environment.

Practical implications

The findings illustrate the need for strong partnerships, for programmes that are designed from the ground up as apprenticeships, and for effective integration of apprentices into the organisation's working environment.

Originality/value

This study updates and adds to the literature on DAs and work-integrated higher education. It emphasises three aspects that have hitherto been given little attention: the value of DAs for public-sector recruitment and for creating social mobility within the existing workforce, and the importance of ensuring apprenticeships are aligned with organisational objectives.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Book part

Awele Achi and Francis Chukwuedo Achi

Recently, there is an increasing academic and practitioner interest on the Igbo ethnic group, their business activities and how they have utilised industrial clusters to…

Abstract

Recently, there is an increasing academic and practitioner interest on the Igbo ethnic group, their business activities and how they have utilised industrial clusters to drive local industrial development in the southeast region of Nigeria and the country at large. However, there are relatively few studies that have explored the mechanisms driving this development. Our chapter focuses on explicating the Igbo business industrial clusters and its inherent locally generated venture capital approach built on the Igbo traditional culture and philosophy. We draw on previous literature to show the three phases: assessing competency, providing the start-up capital and continuous replication process involved in creating and sustaining the locally generated venture capital approach as operated by Igbo business industrial clusters. We contend that overall, this approach has the potential to drive modern business and industrial policies for driving entrepreneurial start-ups, innovation, and economic sustainability. We conclude our chapter by highlighting the implications for Africa, African business practices and areas for future studies.

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Article

Martin Fojt

The trend now in many organizations is to decentralize operations, giving greater responsibility to employees in the form of empowerment. Getting rid of a whole layer…

Abstract

The trend now in many organizations is to decentralize operations, giving greater responsibility to employees in the form of empowerment. Getting rid of a whole layer of management may sound wonderful to the company accountant and also to many employees, but where does this leave the majority of aspiring young workers who expect to have a career ahead of them? By eradicating middle management, the chain to the highest echelons of the company are dramatically reduced. This can of course be a very good policy in that people have quicker and better contact with the decision‐making people, but this can also leave a vacuum of promotional uncertainty owing to the flattening in the hierarchical chain. Many people like the extra responsibility that empowerment brings, but they must also be able to see that they also have a future within the organization.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Content available

Abstract

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 40 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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