Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 January 2009

Michel Rod and Nicholas J. Ashill

This study aims to expand on previous research on the antecedents and outcomes of burnout, and to examine the role of job resourcefulness as a situational personality…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to expand on previous research on the antecedents and outcomes of burnout, and to examine the role of job resourcefulness as a situational personality trait with the capacity to ameliorate burnout. Using data from Call Center frontline employees (FLEs) in a New Zealand banking context, the paper seeks to investigate the direct influence of job resourcefulness in a model examining the antecedents and outcomes of burnout.

Design/methodology/approach

Call Center FLEs completed a self‐administered questionnaire on job demands, job resources, burnout symptoms, job resourcefulness and service recovery performance. Data obtained from the FLEs were analyzed using the SEM‐based Partial Least Squares (PLS) methodology.

Findings

Eight of the 14 advanced hypotheses were supported and the results suggest that job resourcefulness plays a significant role in burnout and in influencing Call Center FLE service recovery performance.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study include the generalizability of the findings since the study was conducted within one organizational context and one country. Suggestions for future research include an examination of job resourcefulness as a moderator in the JD‐R model of burnout and other personality traits specific to frontline employee jobs such as Customer Orientation.

Practical implications

The research advances understanding of burnout, personality traits and FLE service recovery performance in a Call Center context and the findings indicate that managers can take actions on a number of fronts to assist in reducing burnout symptoms and progress toward the achievement of Call Center service recovery excellence.

Originality/value

Previously, no attention has been given to understanding the antecedents of service recovery performance mediated by the symptoms of burnout in a Call Center context. In addition, there has been no attempt to examine the role of situational personality traits and their effect in burnout. By expanding existing burnout research, the study investigates a partial mediated model of burnout and its influence on Call Center FLE service recovery performance.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 September 2019

Judith Semeijn, Joris Van Ruysseveldt, Greet Vonk and Tinka van Vuuren

Adequate recovery from burnout is important to understand. The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether post-traumatic growth (PTG) contributes to higher engagement…

Abstract

Purpose

Adequate recovery from burnout is important to understand. The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether post-traumatic growth (PTG) contributes to higher engagement and reduced symptoms of burnout and whether this process is mediated by personal resources.

Design/methodology/approach

In a cross-sectional survey, 166 Dutch workers who had fully recovered from burnout were questioned on their level of PTG, their personal resources (optimism, resilience and self-efficacy), and their levels of engagement and burnout.

Findings

Fully recovered workers scored somewhat higher on current burnout level, but did not differ from norm group workers in their engagement level. Moreover, PTG appeared to positively affect both higher engagement and lower burnout levels, which is fully mediated by personal resources.

Research limitations/implications

Post-traumatic growth (PTG) impacts on engagement and burnout levels amongst workers who have recovered from burnout by enhancing personal resources. The role of personal resources and the impact of PTG on engagement and burnout complaints following (recovery from) burnout deserve further investigation.

Practical implications

Management can support workers who have (recovered from a) burnout, by being aware of their (higher) engagement, and facilitate the enhancement of PTG and personal resources.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to study the role of PTG after (recovery from) burnout and reveals valuable findings for both research and practice.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2013

Steve Bagi

What happens when leaders are unable to keep leading? Leaders are often expected to be enthusiastic, innovative and help lead their organization forward. However…

Abstract

What happens when leaders are unable to keep leading? Leaders are often expected to be enthusiastic, innovative and help lead their organization forward. However, sometimes they can find themselves so emotionally and physically depleted that they are unable to function, even at the most basic level. Years of stress, heavy responsibilities, personal issues and unhealthy work hours can take a toll in the form of ‘burnout’. The battery is flat and the car cannot start. There are many contributing factors to burnout. It comes at a high cost to the leader, his family and his organization. This chapter will look at the nature of burnout and examine how the leader’s personality, work role, leadership style and life experiences can all contribute to the development of this condition. The impact of burnout, pathways to recovery and some preventative measures will also be examined combining current research findings with the author’s own experience of burnout. This chapter aims to highlight the need for leaders to look after themselves and for organizations to help support their leaders in an effective way. Although recovery from burnout may be a difficult and long journey, leaders can regain their strength and motivation and return to the role stronger and with more effective coping strategies.

Details

Collective Efficacy: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on International Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-680-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 July 2009

Nicholas J. Ashill, Michel Rod, Peter Thirkell and Janet Carruthers

This study aims to extend previous research on the relationship between role stressors and symptoms of burnout by examining the influence of job resourcefulness as a…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to extend previous research on the relationship between role stressors and symptoms of burnout by examining the influence of job resourcefulness as a situational personality trait in the burnout process, and its impact on service recovery performance. Using data from call centre frontline employees (FLEs) in New Zealand, it seeks to investigate the moderating influence of job resourcefulness on the relationships between role stressors, burnout symptoms and FLE service recovery performance.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, call centre FLEs completed a self‐administered online survey questionnaire on role stressors, emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation, job resourcefulness and service recovery performance. Data were analyzed using structural equations modelling (SEM) by means of LISREL 8.53.

Findings

The results show that job resourcefulness buffers both the dysfunctional effects of role stressors on symptoms of burnout and the effects of role stressors on FLE service recovery performance.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study include the generalisability of the findings within one organisational context. Suggestions for future research include an examination of other personality traits specific to FLE jobs such as customer orientation.

Practical implications

The research advances understanding of the relationships between role stressors, emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation, job resourcefulness as a situational personality trait and FLE service recovery performance in a call centre environment. The findings highlight the value of job resourceful FLEs, and suggest a number of practical implications for the identification, recruitment and retention of call centre FLEs.

Originality/value

No attention has been given to examining the role of situational personality traits and their effect on the burnout process. By extending previous research on the relationship between role stressors and burnout symptoms, this study investigates the impact of job resourcefulness in the burnout process and in influencing the service recovery performance efforts of call centre FLEs directly.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Amorette Mae Perkins, Joseph Henry Ridler, Laura Hammond, Simone Davies and Corinna Hackmann

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of attending a Recovery College (RC) on NHS staff attitudes towards mental health and recovery, clinical and peer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of attending a Recovery College (RC) on NHS staff attitudes towards mental health and recovery, clinical and peer interactions, and personal wellbeing.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative and quantitative data were collected via online surveys from 94 participants. Thematic analysis and descriptive statistics were used.

Findings

Themes were identified for change in attitudes towards mental health and recovery: new meanings of recovery; challenging traditional views on recovery; hope for recovery; and increased parity. The majority felt that the RC positively influenced the way they supported others. Themes relating to this were: using or sharing taught skills; increased understanding and empathy; challenging non-recovery practices; and adopting recovery practices. Responses highlighted themes surrounding impacts on personal wellbeing: connectedness; safe place; self-care; and sense of competency and morale at work. Another category labelled “Design of RC” emerged with the themes co-learning, co-production and co-facilitation, and content.

Research limitations/implications

It is important to understand whether RCs are a useful resource for staff. This research suggests that RCs could help to reconcile Implementing Recovery through Organisational Change’s 10 Key Challenges and reduce staff burnout, which has implications for service provision.

Originality/value

This is one of the first papers to directly explore the value of RCs for staff attending as students, highlighting experiences of co-learning.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Kam Jugdev, Gita Mathur and Christian Cook

Given the demanding and stressful nature of project work, with a view to explore established concepts of burnout within the project management context, the purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the demanding and stressful nature of project work, with a view to explore established concepts of burnout within the project management context, the purpose of this paper is to examine two instruments: the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and the Areas of Worklife Survey (AWS). Since there is a paucity of literature in project management anchored within the MBI and the Areas of Worklife Survey (AWS), this paper proposes a high-level model on burnout in project management, drawing on the literature underlying these two instruments.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a conceptual approach, the paper reviews the social psychology literature on burnout and then the narrow stream of literature on burnout in project management. The paper develops and proposes a conceptual model as a foundation to explore the links between the determinants of project manager burnout/engagement and turnover/retention.

Findings

This paper contributes to an improved understanding of the determinants of project manager burnout, engagement, turnover, and retention.

Practical implications

The driver for this research is to contribute to the emerging literature on burnout in project management and strategies to help improve engagement and retention of project managers in the discipline – specifically, their tenure in organizations and/or the profession.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the topic of burnout in the project management context. An improved understanding of the stressors in project management contexts, and the mechanisms to mitigate the stress, can add to our understanding of project manager well-being, engagement and retention, improved project success, and healthier work environments.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2020

Adil Zahoor

This study explores the driver influence of employee proactive personality on service recovery performance with work engagement as mediator. The moderating role of job…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores the driver influence of employee proactive personality on service recovery performance with work engagement as mediator. The moderating role of job resources (social support, supervisory coaching and performance feedback) is also examined in the proactivity-performance linkage to analyze the interaction effect of employee proactivity and job resources on recovery performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data pertaining to the constructs under investigation were collected using a structured questionnaire from 432 dyads of employees from four companies operating in the Indian retail banking sector. Each dyad comprised of one frontline employee and her peer (colleague). Responses to work engagement and job resources were self-reported by frontline staff, as peer ratings were solicited for frontline employees' proactivity and recovery performance.

Findings

Empirical findings suggest that frontline employees' proactive personality significantly ameliorates their work engagement which in turn exerts a positive driver effect on their service recovery performance. In the case of less proactive employees (those with a proactivity score of less than mean value), service recovery performance is boosted when they receive constant feedback on their recovery performance. The results, however, did not provide significant evidence with regard to the moderating role of social support and supervisory coaching.

Originality/value

This study is one of the maiden attempts to relate employee proactive personality with service recovery performance. Since the research relating personality with recovery performance is largely underexplored yet fundamentally important, this study expands the available literature by examining as to what type of employee is more likely to deliver superior service recovery performance with little organizational support.

Details

Journal of Contemporary Marketing Science, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7480

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 June 2019

Mo Zhang and Ruoqi Geng

In accordance with the commitment–trust theory, employee attitudes and behaviours mediate the impact of empowerment on service recovery performance. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

In accordance with the commitment–trust theory, employee attitudes and behaviours mediate the impact of empowerment on service recovery performance. The purpose of this paper is to extend the self-regulating process model and develop a structural framework that combines empowerment, self-regulation mechanisms (service recovery awareness, job engagement and emotional exhaustion) and post-recovery satisfaction. This framework explores how empowerment can lead to action of frontline employees (FLEs) in service recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors test the hypotheses by investigating 290 pairs of FLEs and customers, who have service failure experience in the express mail industry, using structure equation modelling.

Findings

The findings show that empowerment enhances both service recovery awareness and job engagement. On the one hand, service recovery awareness has a positive impact on emotional exhaustion, which has a negative impact on post-recovery satisfaction. On the other hand, job engagement has a positive impact on performance. These results provide the whole picture of the double-edged effects of empowerment on FLEs in service recovery.

Practical implications

This paper indicates that managers should re-consider approaches to empowerment based on self-regulation process to enhance performance following service failure.

Originality/value

This study explores the dark side of empowerment in service recovery from a self-regulation perspective.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 58 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Matti Vuorensyrjä and Matti Mälkiä

This paper aims to take a look at police‐specific factors of stress – police stressors – and to assess the effects of these factors on police officer burnout. The paper…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to take a look at police‐specific factors of stress – police stressors – and to assess the effects of these factors on police officer burnout. The paper also seeks to test the linearity of these effects.

Design/methodology/approach

The study focuses on four stressors: defective leadership, role conflicts, threat of violence, and time pressure. As a measure of burnout, Bergen Burnout Indicator 15 is used. The data are cross‐section in nature and come from the Police Personnel Barometer (PPB) conducted in Finland in 2008. The PPB‐survey targeted the entire police administration in Finland. The response rate was 67.2 percent (n=6,871). The current paper uses a sub‐sample of police officers (constable rank) from three functional areas of policing (n=2,821).

Findings

Controlling for age, gender, education, shift work, tenure and the function of the police officer, the effects of the different stressors on burnout were all statistically significant. Statistically significant and robust nonlinear effects of the stressors on burnout were also found.

Originality/value

The study introduces a new measure of stress to analyze police work. It takes a preliminary look at the reliability and validity of the measure. The study considers linear as well as nonlinear effects of the stressors on burnout and suggests that the effects under scrutiny are essentially nonlinear.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Silvia Roncalli and Michael Byrne

The purpose of this paper is to examine the levels of job satisfaction (JS) and burnout among psychologists working in Irish community mental health teams (CMHTs), and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the levels of job satisfaction (JS) and burnout among psychologists working in Irish community mental health teams (CMHTs), and the relationships between these factors and three relational predictors: teamwork, liaison with management/supervisor and relationships among co-workers. Associations with absenteeism and participants’ turnover potential were also explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were 77 psychologists currently working in CMHTs nationwide or who had left a CMHT in the previous three years.

Findings

Liaison with management/supervisor and teamwork emerged as significant predictors of JS but not of burnout. Relationships among co-workers emerged as a significant predictor of two dimensions of burnout. JS and burnout levels had no overall significant association with absenteeism or turnover potential.

Practical/implications

This study confirmed that well-known associations between relational aspects of one’s job and the levels of JS and burnout were also present in this sample of psychologists, highlighting the vulnerability of these professionals to the same risks that affect workers in positions requiring comparatively lower psychological-mindedness. Service providers need to consider this important factor in their efforts to enhance productivity and prevent turnover, and it can be addressed at no extra costs by optimising the use of existing resources.

Originality/Value

This study is one of the first to focus on relational aspects of CMHTs considering a sample of psychologists. Furthermore, while the three relational factors considered have been examined before in their individual relationships to JS and burnout, this study investigates their interactions with each other.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000