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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Ian Buick and Mahesh Thomas

This paper details the results of research undertaken on middle management burn‐out in hotels within a 50‐mile radius of Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. The research explores the…

Abstract

This paper details the results of research undertaken on middle management burn‐out in hotels within a 50‐mile radius of Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. The research explores the effect of variables such as gender, marital status, organizational and familial support on the degree of perceived burn‐out experienced by middle‐level managers associated with front‐line departments (reception, food and beverage service, housekeeping, etc.) in hotels. The study found that women experience a higher degree of burn‐out than men, as do single (unmarried) managers. Managers who perceive less family support also experience higher levels of burn‐out. A comparison of this study with similar studies undertaken in 1989, 1990 and 1993 shows that burn‐out has become more of a management problem. The 1999 figures show an average increase of 32 per cent from 1989 across the three dimensions of the burn‐out inventory used in this study.

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International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2007

Sharon Oddie and Leah Ousley

The study aimed to identify occupational stressors and measure experiences of clinical burn‐out among a group of mental health nurses and occupational therapists in a…

Abstract

The study aimed to identify occupational stressors and measure experiences of clinical burn‐out among a group of mental health nurses and occupational therapists in a medium secure service. All the nursing staff (n=115) and occupational therapists (n=9) on three wards in a medium secure hospital were asked to partake in the study, and to complete a modified version of the Psychiatric Nurse Occupational Stress Scale (PNOSS), the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and a demographic questionnaire designed for the study.Results from the PNOSS revealed that organisational issues elicited the greatest stress and were most strongly related to high burn‐out scores, identified by the MBI. Limited resource and staff conflict were also associated with stress and burn‐out. Patient care had a relatively small impact. MBI findings were that a substantial proportion (54%) were experiencing high burn‐out in relation to emotional exhaustion.

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The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Y.Y. Chiu and Y.S. Liao

The waste material removal process in the laminated object manufacturing, so‐called de‐cubing, is a time‐consuming work resulting from the inherent adhesion between the…

Abstract

The waste material removal process in the laminated object manufacturing, so‐called de‐cubing, is a time‐consuming work resulting from the inherent adhesion between the part and the waste material. A new method to improve the problem is proposed in this paper. It is noticed that when the temperature of the working area, being raised by the laser beams, reaches the “decomposition temperature” of the adhesive, the stickiness of the adhesive will “burn out”. Based on these findings, a novel laser path planning strategy is introduced. The threshold value of the slope of the part which determines whether the burning‐out rule should be applied in laser path planning is derived. If the slope of the part falls below the threshold value, the burning‐out rule is utilized. Under such circumstances, an optimal laser path according to the proposed thermomechanical model is designated to the overlap zone to burn out the binder. Experimental results indicate that the method increases the de‐cubing efficiency, reduces the de‐cubing time required and damage the part less likely.

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Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Yoram Neumann and Edith Finaly‐Neumann

The relationships between support variables (work significance,collegial support and chairperson′s support) and indicators of facultyburn‐out (emotional exhaustion and…

Abstract

The relationships between support variables (work significance, collegial support and chairperson′s support) and indicators of faculty burn‐out (emotional exhaustion and feeling of personal accomplishment) are examined. In addition, the relationships between the syndrome of faculty burnout and its potential consequences (organisational commitment and recent research performance) are explored. The study is conducted using a sample of faculty members from 40 research university departments, ten each in physics, sociology, electrical engineering, and education. The major findings are: support indicators are the most influential determinants of emotional exhaustion in physics and the least influential in sociology and education; the same support indicators have the maximal explanatory power with regard to personal accomplishment in physics, and the minimal explanatory power in education; emotional exhaustion is related strongly to commitment and recent published articles in hard sciences, whereas the same relationships are quite weak for the soft sciences; and personal accomplishment is positively related to commitment in all fields while it is related strongly to recent published articles in hard sciences. The implications of this study are discussed.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2013

J.I. Abd EL-Thalouth and S. H. Nassar

Four different blended fabrics which comprised polyester/viscose (50/50), wool/cotton (50/50), wool/cotton (30/70) and cotton/linen (50/50) were subject to burn-out

Abstract

Four different blended fabrics which comprised polyester/viscose (50/50), wool/cotton (50/50), wool/cotton (30/70) and cotton/linen (50/50) were subject to burn-out printing style using different agents. The latter comprised different concentrations of aluminum sulphate, sodium mono hydrogen phosphate, aluminum potassium sulphate, sodium hydroxide, tartaric acid, oxalic acid and citric acid. The burn-out printed blends were subject to dyeing using an eco-friendly natural dye, namely madder. The results obtained were evaluated via measuring the percentage (%) loss in weight, the K/S of the colored samples as well as the overall color fastness properties. The results revealed that the loss in weight was dependent on (a) the nature of the blend components, (b) the nature of the burn-out reagent, and (c) the concentration of the used reagent. The dyed burn-out areas were found to have a higher or lesser K/S than that of the ground shade. Hence, different color tones could be obtained which reflect attractive and beauty features. The overall color fastness properties for the blended fabrics printed before and after the burn-out treatment were nearly identical.

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Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Burn‐out is a costly and distressing phenomenon, which damages both individuals and organizations. Employees feel undervalued and frustrated, the quality of their work…

Abstract

Burn‐out is a costly and distressing phenomenon, which damages both individuals and organizations. Employees feel undervalued and frustrated, the quality of their work deteriorates, and ultimately they may leave the organization. If companies could recognize the signs and causes of burn‐out, it might be possible to intervene to prevent it. Recent research has identified some factors which might be involved and offers some practical steps to prevent the loss of valuable staff through burn‐out.

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Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2013

Steve Bagi

What happens when leaders are unable to keep leading? Leaders are often expected to be enthusiastic, innovative and help lead their organization forward. However…

Abstract

What happens when leaders are unable to keep leading? Leaders are often expected to be enthusiastic, innovative and help lead their organization forward. However, sometimes they can find themselves so emotionally and physically depleted that they are unable to function, even at the most basic level. Years of stress, heavy responsibilities, personal issues and unhealthy work hours can take a toll in the form of ‘burnout’. The battery is flat and the car cannot start. There are many contributing factors to burnout. It comes at a high cost to the leader, his family and his organization. This chapter will look at the nature of burnout and examine how the leader’s personality, work role, leadership style and life experiences can all contribute to the development of this condition. The impact of burnout, pathways to recovery and some preventative measures will also be examined combining current research findings with the author’s own experience of burnout. This chapter aims to highlight the need for leaders to look after themselves and for organizations to help support their leaders in an effective way. Although recovery from burnout may be a difficult and long journey, leaders can regain their strength and motivation and return to the role stronger and with more effective coping strategies.

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Collective Efficacy: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on International Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-680-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Roy Bailey

Stress damages us and our performance. It is a real part of most manager's experience and can be said to occur when significant demands exceed perceived management…

Abstract

Stress damages us and our performance. It is a real part of most manager's experience and can be said to occur when significant demands exceed perceived management responsibilities and routines. Stress can be the essence of working life, and certainly need not always be damaging to us. But when it becomes excessive, it is something unwanted.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Pasquale Caponnetto, Rosanna Magro, Lucio Inguscio and Maria Concetta Cannella

Emergency room have particularly stressful work situations. Emergency room personnel cope with stressors on a daily basis. These stressors can be risks factor for burn out

Abstract

Emergency room have particularly stressful work situations. Emergency room personnel cope with stressors on a daily basis. These stressors can be risks factor for burn out and for reduced quality of life and work motivation. Emergency room staff of one of ASP 3 CT urban hospital in Acireale, Italy participated to stress management program by autogenic training twice a month for 16 weeks. This program were prepared based on existing research and studies, and were conducted by clinical psychologists. We found that the mean value in pre-test is significantly different from mean value in post-test for: Perceived Stress Scale PPS (t=7.72 with 27 df and P<0.001); Euro Quality for life (t=-14,13 with 27 df and P<0.001); Work motivation assessed by Visual Analogue scale VAS (t=-4.52 with 27 df and P<0.001). In the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the mean value is significantly different for emotional exhaustion sub-scale (t=5.64 with 27 with 27 df and P<0.001) and for depersonalization subscale (t=6.67 with 27 df and P<0.001). No significant difference was observed for the personal accomplishment sub-scale. This research suggests that psychological interventions with emergency room staff are effective. Our study showed effectiveness of an auto-genic and stress management training in improvement of quality of life, work motivation, burn-out and stress perceptions for emergency department team.

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Mental Illness, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

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Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2017

Margaret Hogarth

Burnout has been recognized and measured in the workplace since the 1970s, particularly in service industries. Libraries can be viewed as service providers. Burnout is the…

Abstract

Burnout has been recognized and measured in the workplace since the 1970s, particularly in service industries. Libraries can be viewed as service providers. Burnout is the result of chronically high work demands combined with emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and diminished personal accomplishment. Burnout components have been linked to physical, emotional, and behavioral consequences, and to high turnover and loss of engagement. Libraries can evaluate burnout levels among staff and address burnout on an individual, management, and organizational level. The Nurse-Experienced Time Pressure, Burnout, and Patient Interaction Questionnaire is modified to identify and quantify activities individuals might use to reduce burnout. The survey is administered to librarians and staff at an academic library and to self-chosen attendees at a conference session on avoiding burnout. Feedback is also solicited in terms of burnout avoidance strategies and possible library responses. Most respondents feel burned out but also committed to providing excellent service to patrons. Respondents have a genuine interest in making work less prone to burnout. Sample sizes were small but gave consistent responses. Burnout can be addressed on an institutional, management, and personal level, with each entity having equal responsibility. Leadership, management, communication, and support efforts can counteract burnout threats. Burnout causes disengagement at work and in personal lives. In terms of personality, neuroticism is a strong predictor of burnout. Making efforts to counteract burnout will lead to a healthier, balanced life. This book chapter is based on research done for a presentation at ER&L 2016 on Avoiding E-Burnout. Causes and counteractions to burnout have been expanded.

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Emotion in the Library Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-083-9

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