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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Janice C. Sipior and Burke T. Ward

The purpose of this paper is to provide a research model and hypotheses that explores software users' perceptions of privacy, trust, and US legal protection in using…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a research model and hypotheses that explores software users' perceptions of privacy, trust, and US legal protection in using application software with embedded spyware.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental study was undertaken requiring subjects to use an online analytical processing software product. After use, the experimental group was told spyware was embedded in the software. Questionnaire responses for the experimental and control group were compared using independent samples t‐test. Multiple regression was used to determine significant predictors of overall trust in the software vendor.

Findings

Users of software with spyware, versus users of software without spyware, have lower trust perceptions of a software vendor. Further examination of trustworthiness as a multi‐dimensional construct, reveals trustworthiness‐ability and trustworthiness‐integrity are important influences of overall trust of a vendor.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of the findings is the use of a convenience sample, limiting the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

The results may provide guidance to software vendors and government regulatory agencies in addressing the concerns associated with spyware.

Originality/value

Software vendors should rethink the practice of embedding spyware in software applications, unless user trust can be maintained.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Burke T. Ward, Janice C. Sipior, Linda Volonino and Carolyn Purwin

The purpose of this paper is to explore the challenges confronting organizations in responding to the recent electronic discovery (e‐discovery) amendments to the US…

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746

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the challenges confronting organizations in responding to the recent electronic discovery (e‐discovery) amendments to the US federal rules of civil procedure. Failure to comply with these rules, even unintentionally, can have significant adverse legal consequences for parties of the lawsuit. The vast majority of information and data is electronic and stored in numerous files and on a variety of media. Thus, there is a critical need to better manage electronic content and implement a strategic approach to accommodate new rules, legislation, and ever‐changing technology. In response, the authors provide recommendations for enterprise‐wide e‐discovery readiness.

Design/methodology/approach

To investigate the legal theory for e‐discovery, the authors examine precedent‐setting legal cases for the purpose of providing managerial recommendations for developing and implementing a comprehensive policy for compliance and litigation purposes.

Findings

According to the authors' evaluation of the amendments and applicable case law, the new rules make clear that electronic information and data are discoverable, and that failure to protect and store in a retrievable format may lead to adverse legal consequences.

Practical implications

To better prepare for the duties imposed by the e‐discovery amendments, the authors recommend the formation of an enterprise‐wide multi‐functional electronically stored information Discovery Team to develop, implement, and periodically review a comprehensive electronic records management policy and procedures for compliance and litigation purposes.

Originality/value

The authors take into consideration the dearth of information systems literature addressing the critical need to better manage electronic content and to implement an enterprise‐wide strategic approach to accommodate the requirements of e‐discovery, or face costly consequences.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2013

Janice C. Sipior, Burke T. Ward and Regina Connolly

The purpose of this paper is to revisit the internet users’ information privacy concerns (IUIPC) construct, a research model, and hypotheses based on Malhotra et al.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to revisit the internet users’ information privacy concerns (IUIPC) construct, a research model, and hypotheses based on Malhotra et al. (2004) to assess the continued applicability of this construct. The relationship among privacy concerns, trusting beliefs, and risk beliefs continues to be unclear. Empirical evidence about the impact of privacy concerns on behavior is mixed.

Design/methodology/approach

A paper-based questionnaire was distributed and collected from 63 part-time graduate students of a private university in the mid-Atlantic USA. These respondents have an average of six years of full-time professional work experience and the vast majority (88.9 percent) has over seven years of experience on the internet. Questionnaire items measured the constructs of the IUIPC instrument. All measurement scales were validated using factor analysis, Cronbach's α, and reliability analysis. For hypothesis testing, multiple regression analysis was used.

Findings

The results partially support those of Malhotra et al. (2004). Consistent are the findings that the higher the trust a consumer holds for an online company, the less likely that consumer is to view providing personal information as risky. Also consistent is that the higher the trust a consumer holds for an online company, the more likely is that consumer to intend to provide personal information online. Finally, the greater risk a consumer has for providing personal information, the less willing that consumer is to reveal such information online. However, the results did not support a negative relationship between the IUIPC construct and consumer trust in an online company or a positive relationship between IUIPC and consumer risk in providing personal information to an online company. The paper concludes that the IUIPC is not the valid scale to employ in measuring information privacy concerns.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of the findings is the use of a small convenience sample, limiting the insights into interrelationships between various dimensions of privacy concerns and the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

The results may provide guidance to online retailers in addressing the dimensions of privacy concerns related to trusting beliefs and risk beliefs.

Originality/value

IUIPC were measured using the IUIPC instrument. This responds to Malhotra et al.'s (2004) call to use the IUIPC scale and the associated research framework to further investigate consumer privacy concerns and the suggestion by Belanger and Crossler (2011) that more studies should explore this scale. Further, both Westin (1967), and Smith et al. (1996) recognize that privacy attitudes and concerns may change over time, providing motivation to revisit IUIPC.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 October 2013

Zahir Irani and Muhammad Kamal

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220

Abstract

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Maged Ali and Muhammad Kamal

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323

Abstract

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Barrie O. Pettman and Richard Dobbins

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

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19060

Abstract

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 21 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Jan E. Stets and Peter J. Burke

The purpose of this chapter is to review the historical development of identity theory from 1988 to the present, and then outline some thoughts about future directions for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to review the historical development of identity theory from 1988 to the present, and then outline some thoughts about future directions for the theory.

Methodology/Approach

The chapter discusses major advances in identity theory over the past 25 years such as the incorporation of the perceptual control system into the theory, the introduction of “resources” in which symbolic and sign meanings are important, new views of the social structure, the relevance of the situation in influencing the identity process, the idea of different bases of identities, broadening our understanding of multiple identities, studying identity change, and bringing in emotions into the theory.

Findings

Throughout the review, empirical work is identified and briefly discussed that supports the major advances of the theory.

Research limitations

The chapter suggests a number of ways that identity theory may be developed in the future such as examining negative or stigmatized identities. Additionally, there is a discussion as to ways in which the theory may be tied to other theoretical traditions such as affect control theory, exchange theory, and social identity theory.

Social Implications

Identity theory has had a number of applications to various areas in society, including understanding crime, education, race/ethnicity, gender, the family, and the environment.

Originality/Value of Chapter

This is the most recent overview of identity theory over the past 25 years. It becomes clear to the reader that the theory offers a way of understanding the person as a cognitive, emotional, and behavioral agent who influences the structure of society but who is also influenced by the social structure.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-078-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Yaw A. Debrah and Ian G. Smith

Presents over sixty abstracts summarising the 1999 Employment Research Unit annual conference held at the University of Cardiff. Explores the multiple impacts of…

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10358

Abstract

Presents over sixty abstracts summarising the 1999 Employment Research Unit annual conference held at the University of Cardiff. Explores the multiple impacts of globalization on work and employment in contemporary organizations. Covers the human resource management implications of organizational responses to globalization. Examines the theoretical, methodological, empirical and comparative issues pertaining to competitiveness and the management of human resources, the impact of organisational strategies and international production on the workplace, the organization of labour markets, human resource development, cultural change in organisations, trade union responses, and trans‐national corporations. Cites many case studies showing how globalization has brought a lot of opportunities together with much change both to the employee and the employer. Considers the threats to existing cultures, structures and systems.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Kelly L. Markowski and Richard T. Serpe

The purpose of this paper was to empirically integrate the structural and perceptual control programs in the identity theory. This integration involved examining how the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to empirically integrate the structural and perceptual control programs in the identity theory. This integration involved examining how the structural concepts of prominence and salience moderate the impact that the perceptual control process of nonverification has role-specific self-esteem.

Methodology/approach

We use survey data from normative and counter-normative conditions in the parent and spouse identities to test a series of structural equation models. In each model, we test the direct impacts of prominence, salience, and nonverification on worth, efficacy, and authenticity. We also test interaction effects between prominence and nonverification as well as salience and nonverification on the three self-esteem outcomes.

Findings

Out of the 24 possible interaction effects, only three were significant. By contrast, the expected positive effects of prominence on worth were supported among all identities, while the expected positive effects of salience on self-esteem were supported only among normative identities. Also as expected, the negative effects of nonverification on self-esteem were supported, though most strongly among counter-normative identities.

Practical Implications

Our findings indicate that the structural and perceptual control concepts have independent effects on self-esteem. Thus, future research should incorporate both programs when examining identity processes on self-esteem. However, depending on the normativity or counter-normativity of the identities of interest, research may find it useful to focus on concepts from one program over the other.

Originality/value of Paper

This paper is a test of integration of the two research paradigms in the identity theory, which addresses the micro–macro problem in a unique way.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-013-4

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Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2020

Jan E. Stets, Peter J. Burke, Richard T. Serpe and Robin Stryker

In this chapter, we advance an understanding of identity theory (IT) as originally created by Sheldon Stryker and developed over the past 50 years. We address…

Abstract

In this chapter, we advance an understanding of identity theory (IT) as originally created by Sheldon Stryker and developed over the past 50 years. We address misunderstandings of IT concepts and connections. We provide definitions of key ideas in IT, propositions that identify important relationships, and scope conditions that outline the circumstances to which IT applies. Our goal is to provide scholars with an accurate view of IT so that it can continue to advance the science of human behavior in sociology and beyond.

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