Search results

1 – 10 of 13
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Shelagh Ferguson

This paper seeks to explore whether the global market segment Generation Y shares a common perception of a specific consumption activity, namely bungy jumping, and how…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore whether the global market segment Generation Y shares a common perception of a specific consumption activity, namely bungy jumping, and how perceptions of cool operate around that.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methodology is adopted, appropriate to the exploratory aims of the research, which utilises existing filmed interviews to elicit responses from other members of Generation Y. The research explores shared identification, meaning and knowledge of a specific consumption practice, namely commercial bungy jumping.

Findings

The actual form of consumption, bungy jumping was widely accepted as being “cool” but a global consensus on a “cool” consumer and their story could not be reached. The research concludes by proposing a hierarchy for the attribution of cool from one Generation Y member to another; thus extending theoretical discussion and knowledge by investigating an established concept in a specific context to illustrate the complex and uneven nature of cultural globalisation.

Research limitations/implications

This research interprets global Generation Y culture from a small convenience sample from America, Ireland, Scotland and England, thus generating avenues for further research as discussed.

Originality/value

These findings have value for businesses that create consumption experiences for Generation Y customers and scholars seeking insight into the plural and complex function of cool.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Shelagh Ferguson

People arguably create “storied lives”; including constructing accounts of their leisure that become part of their personal and social identities. These stories are…

Abstract

Purpose

People arguably create “storied lives”; including constructing accounts of their leisure that become part of their personal and social identities. These stories are valuable and relevant, not just to themselves, but also to others with whom they choose to share their stories. This paper and accompanying film aim to further understanding of how consumers visiting the second highest bungy jump in the world construct and convey stories of this experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The research approach is exploratory. The researcher observed, interviewed, and filmed informants at the primary site of investigation. The interview transcripts were transcribed in full. Emergent themes were validated through constant cross‐checking. The themes provided the foundation for the accompanying video.

Findings

Several themes regarding narratives and high‐risk leisure emerged including the construction of factual accounts and rehearsed accounts, the use of markers to symbolize and make more tangible the consumption experience, and the role of technology in the communication of the stories.

Research limitations/implications

This exploratory research offers insight into the components of narratives for Generation Y tourists consuming in New Zealand. These findings do not claim to generalize to other samples or activities.

Originality/value

The paper extends the knowledge of how stories figure in consumers' lives; particularly in the context of the consumption of high‐risk leisure.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Ian Yeoman and Una McMahon‐Beattie

The purpose of this paper is to gain an understanding of why the phenomena of knitting is important in society and an explanation of the underlying currents for tourism.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain an understanding of why the phenomena of knitting is important in society and an explanation of the underlying currents for tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a futurist's observations and reflections.

Findings

Why is knitting making a comeback? Consumers are shutting the door on the world and cocooning thus returning to the world of crafts and hobbies as a way to seek enjoyment. An interest in authenticity and the past as an escape from the present. Single people looking for something to do in an urban world, thus some consumers have turned to knitting. Today, the authors are seeing niche holiday providers offering knitting cruises, knitting escapes and knitting adventures. For New Zealand the home Merrino wool knitting tourism has the potential to be bigger than bungy jumping (some would say).

Originality/value

The trends paper provides an insight of the key trends from a societal perspective of what knitting means and its manifestation as a tourism experience. The value to operators is understanding those trends in context of why the phenomena is occurring.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Cheryl J. Travers

Abstract

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Marylouise Caldwell and Paul Henry

The purpose of this editorial is to introduce six audio‐visual and written pieces that communicate research findings about contemporary popular culture.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this editorial is to introduce six audio‐visual and written pieces that communicate research findings about contemporary popular culture.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a summary overview of the papers in the special issue, highlighting similarities across submissions as well their distinctive contributions.

Findings

The authors conclude that researchers apply audio‐visual material to communicate their research findings in at least two ways: as stand‐alones to convey key messages; and to validate and/or dramatize highlights of their written work.

Originality/value

The paper provides an introduction to a special issue that features the application of multi‐media to communicate research findings associated with contemporary popular culture.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Jan Reuter

Would you like to take control of your career so that you are not at the whim of the employer or the economy? The aim of this paper is to learn how to apply successful

Abstract

Purpose

Would you like to take control of your career so that you are not at the whim of the employer or the economy? The aim of this paper is to learn how to apply successful small business strategies to your career so that you are in charge.

Design/methodology/approach

Learn how to apply successful small business strategies to your career so that you are in charge. This article will help you to look at your career through the lens of an entrepreneur taking a product to market – in this case the product is you! The five steps include: assessing the strengths, capabilities and skills of your product; reviewing what the market wants; analysing the gaps between your product and what the market wants; planning the further development of your product; and marketing your product.

Findings

As of July 9 the author is launching a survey to gather success stories of how people have recession proofed their careers. However at the time of this writing the findings from that survey are not available.

Practical implications

These practical steps are easy to apply and can give your career the boost it needs in these uncertain economic times.

Originality/value

While many authors have given the advice to either treat your career as a business or to be the Chief Executive Officer of your career, “Five steps to a recession proof career” provides practical advice on how to actually achieve that goal.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Dr Brian Young

Abstract

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 June 2018

Malene Gram, Anette Therkelsen and Jacob Roesgaard Kirkegaard Larsen

This paper aims to explore mixed emotions experienced by parents and children on holiday, how they are dealt with and how they influence the way “family” is “staged” and “done”.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore mixed emotions experienced by parents and children on holiday, how they are dealt with and how they influence the way “family” is “staged” and “done”.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on 24 qualitative interviews with Danish parents and a questionnaire study reporting answers from 66 Danish children (11-15-year-old).

Findings

Problems external and internal to the family are identified and the latter are associated with more unease particularly among parents. This paper shows that parents invest significant narrative efforts in transcending gaps between ideals and practices. Also children are aware of the gaps between ideals and practices; they seem more matter-of-fact, however, regarding critical aspects of holidays.

Research limitations/implications

The informants of the study solely represent two-parent hetero-sexual families of Danish origin, and so inclusion of a wider range of families would have added interesting perspectives. Furthermore, children’s perspectives on critical holiday incidents need further research.

Practical implications

Creators of family holiday products and marketing should present a more nuanced imagery taking a more diverse approach to what “family” on holiday looks like. They could take up the challenge of depicting a broader range of family situations, also showing less harmonious moments, using humour, and showing opportunities for some “alone time” for both parents and children should relational overload happen. Also occasional “wifi-free” moments seem to be much appreciated by all family members, and development of offline family experiences would seem to strike a chord.

Social implications

The contemporary paradigm of intensive parenting along with strong ideals for family holidays make it essential for parents to narratively deal with and legitimize and transform less happy moments. To take pressure off contemporary families, it is important to bring to the fore the less glossy aspects of family holidays.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper is to illustrate the strong efforts applied by families to keep up a certain front to be the family that “ought to be” by nurturing and narrating positive emotions in relation to family holidays. The inclusion of children’s voices gives insights into children’s annoyance with parents’ rowing, relational overload and parents’ occasional lack of attention to children, for example through parental use of mobile phones during holiday togetherness.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Suku Bhaskaran and Felicity Hardley

Builds on past studies in the USA and assesses the market potential for functional goods through investigating consumer needs and attitudes. Aims to add to past research…

Abstract

Builds on past studies in the USA and assesses the market potential for functional goods through investigating consumer needs and attitudes. Aims to add to past research through: assessing consumer knowledge and beliefs on nutrition and diet‐health relationships; analysing the influence of such knowledge and beliefs of information and sources of information; and evaluating the effectiveness and implications of government preventative health campaigns on purchase behaviour. Concludes that issues regarding personal and national health are extremely important because of the financial costs and human suffering that could be involved; and that functional goods, as a relatively new phenomenon, still need to be examined further with regard to their influence on trust and legitimacy in buyer behaviour.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Michelle Stella Mars, Ian Seymour Yeoman and Una McMahon-Beattie

Sex tourism is well documented in the literature, but what about porn tourism? Whether it is a Ping Pong show in Phuket or the Banana show in Amsterdam, porn and tourism…

Abstract

Purpose

Sex tourism is well documented in the literature, but what about porn tourism? Whether it is a Ping Pong show in Phuket or the Banana show in Amsterdam, porn and tourism have an encounter and gaze no different from the Mona Lisa in the Louvre or magnificent views of New Zealand’s Southern Alps. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores the intersections of tourism, porn and the future as a conceptual framework.

Findings

Four intersections are derived from the conceptual framework. Intersection 1, the Future of Tourism, portrays the evolution of tourism and explores its technological future. Interaction 2, Porn in Tourism, distinguishes between soft- and hard-core porn tourism. Intersection 3, Portraying Porn as a Future Dimension, delves into futurism, science fiction and fantasy. The fourth intersection, the Future Gaze, conveys the thrust of the paper by exploring how technological advancement blends with authenticity and reality. Thus the porn tourist seeks both the visual and the visceral pleasures of desire. The paper concludes with four future gazes of porn tourism, The Allure of Porn, The Porn Bubble, Porn as Liminal Experience and Hardcore.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper is that this is the first paper to systematically examine porn tourism beyond sex tourism overlaying with a futures dimension. Porn tourists actively seek to experience both visual and visceral pleasures. Tourism and pornography both begin with the gaze. The gaze is an integral component of futures thinking. Technology is changing us, making us smarter, driving our thirst for liminal experiences. Like the transition from silent movies to talking pictures the porn tourism experience of the future is likely to involve more of the bodily senses.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

1 – 10 of 13