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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2018

Abubakar Danladi Isah, Isa Bala Muhammad and Idris Katun

This study aims to avail architects with the potentials of knowledge management (KM) principles towards an optimal and effective procedural mechanism for the choice of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to avail architects with the potentials of knowledge management (KM) principles towards an optimal and effective procedural mechanism for the choice of building materials during design and construction processes.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 202 questionnaire forms were distributed in a survey. They were administered to practicing architects and Architectural firms in Nigeria. Thereafter, ANOVA, regression analysis and exploratory factor analysis with reliability and Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of 0.861 identified KM principles in specification writing for architects.

Findings

These findings show that the building material selection procedure can be optimized with efficient and conscious consideration of KM principles imbibed by architects in tune with global trends. The study serves as a guide to architects and other stakeholders on the effect of KM principles in deepening reflectiveness of the surpassing role of effective KM in specification writing in the construction industry.

Originality/value

This is perhaps the first empirical research that sought to understudy knowledge sharing strategies in architectural firms within the context of the study location Nigeria. The value of the research lies in optimization of architects’ building materials’ specification strategy through KM principles.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2018

Wei Wang, Shoujian Zhang and Christine Pasquire

Green specifications are some of the most important strategies for energy saving and describe the best practice in the field of sustainable construction. They have great…

Abstract

Purpose

Green specifications are some of the most important strategies for energy saving and describe the best practice in the field of sustainable construction. They have great effects on resource saving and environmental protection. The demand of sustainable construction has spurred the emerging and development of green specifications. However, there are many factors that affect the adoption of green specifications in China. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors that affect the adoption of green specifications in China.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the comprehensive literature review, a questionnaire survey has been conducted to with major stakeholders in construction area to identify issues concerning the adoption of green specifications in China. In total, 18 variables that affect the adoption of green specifications in were summarized. Then this study uses factor analysis and mean score method to analyze 18 variables which the authors get from the questionnaire.

Findings

Using the rank analysis and factor analysis, the variables have been ranked, analyzed and categorized into five independent factors. They are summarized as: green technology and techniques; awareness and attitude; policies and regulations; market; and economics. This study provides a variable reference for policy makers to put forward focused policies and incentives for green specifications implementation and industry practitioners to better understand of green specifications adoption in China.

Originality/value

This paper makes a contribution to the understanding of the factors that affect the adoption of the green specifications in China. The results can also contribute to better adoption of green specifications in other developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Rosalie Menon and Colin D. A. Porteous

Although a UK trajectory toward zero-carbon development for all new housing by 2016 has been set, the cost of building such homes and the changes implied for current…

Abstract

Although a UK trajectory toward zero-carbon development for all new housing by 2016 has been set, the cost of building such homes and the changes implied for current constructional culture, together with lack of fiscal incentives, makes the target very difficult to achieve. Moreover, the recent governmental clarification of the definition of zero-carbon housing may make it impossible. This paper proposes a prototype construction (see also the associated paper in this issue) and examines in detail both the constructional and cost barriers to eliminating carbon emissions from tightly limited total thermal and electrical consumption targets (not more than 70 kWh/m2). Having established generous access to sunlight and daylight as prerequisites, a related health issue is air quality, especially with air-tight construction. While thermal and hygroscopic capacity can mediate between quality and efficiency, current norms for Scottish housing are notably poor in both respects. A key aim is to assess whether specification for a ‘low-carbon house’ can be cost effective. An analysis is undertaken to asses the increased cost associated with integration of energy efficient measures in the proposed prototype model. The specification of the building envelope and associated renewable technologies are addressed with reference to their cost implication on the overall build cost. Finally potential governmental incentives are proposed to not only meet the 2016 target, but also to promote enthusiasm by the end user. The paper concludes that low-carbon and zero-carbon scenarios would require radical changes of funding/fiscal and building cultures.

Details

Open House International, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2013

Arshad Ali JAVED, Patrick T.I. Lam and Albert P.C. Chan

Social infrastructure projects such as hospitals are increasingly being procured through public private partnerships (PPP). Due to their complex nature and very high…

Abstract

Purpose

Social infrastructure projects such as hospitals are increasingly being procured through public private partnerships (PPP). Due to their complex nature and very high operational requirements, these healthcare projects need special attention in developing robust output specifications at the early procurement stage. The purpose of this paper is to present a model framework of output specifications for adoption by public sector clients in jurisdictions planning to develop hospital PPP/PFI (Private Finance Initiative) projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on an in-depth analysis of best practices from standard and sample project output specification documents used in Australia and the UK for completed hospital projects, reinforced by interviews with key stakeholders in the two countries.

Findings

Drafting output specifications for hospital PPP projects is perceived to be a difficult and challenging task due to the complexity and changing needs brought about by evolving health policy, technology and medical advancement. The overarching target of preparing good output specification is to achieve value for money, innovation, risk transfer (including catering for changes), whole life asset performance and establishing performance criteria to link up with the payment mechanism.

Practical/implications

The proposed framework is built up from public sector requirements on the physical asset, operational services provided by the private sector, with links to payment mechanism and performance evaluation. It also addresses change mechanism as well as conditions upon hand-over back to the public sector.

Originality/value

Unlike traditional projects which are procured using prescriptive specifications, PPP/PFI projects are procured using performance based output specifications. This paper provides the foundation and a model framework for preparing comprehensive output specifications based on best practices in Australia and the UK, using hospital as the contextual background.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1977

S. Balachandran

Civil engineering encompasses such a wide array of subject areas that it would be very difficult to cover all of them in one survey. Basically, civil engineers are…

Abstract

Civil engineering encompasses such a wide array of subject areas that it would be very difficult to cover all of them in one survey. Basically, civil engineers are concerned with the planning, design and construction of buildings, transporation facilities and other structures required for human health, safety and welfare. A major part of their job relates to achieving a coherent relationship between the “built environment” and the “natural environment.” They are required to fulfil this function within the framework of constraints imposed by the present day building codes, union regulations and economic considerations. This survey concerns itself mostly with the general civil engineering reference books and some selected sources on specialized topics like construction engineering, foundation engineering, structural engineering, highway and dam engineering and codes and specifications. A forthcoming survey will deal with the major area of environmental and sanitary engineering.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2013

Arshad Ali Javed, Patrick T.I. Lam and Patrick X.W. Zou

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the challenges faced by the public and private sectors in developing output specifications for Australian public private…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the challenges faced by the public and private sectors in developing output specifications for Australian public private partnership (PPP) projects. In particular, this study aims to examine how the stakeholders (including facilities managers) should cater for future changes in output specifications and make them flexible enough to meet the evolving project objectives.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on 19 semi‐structured interviews with key stakeholders from the public and private sectors in three States of Australia where PPP procurement has been used, including New South Wales (NSW), Queensland and Victoria. The results are triangulated with relevant literature for supports and contrasts.

Findings

For PPP projects, a good set of output specifications is conducive to the achievement of value for money, innovation, risk transfer, whole life asset performance through a clear abatement regime and an effective linkage of performance criteria to the payment mechanism. For existing specifications, it was found that too many and complex KPIs were specified, which were difficult to monitor, measure and implement by the client. Very prescriptive specifications hindered innovations and did not allow appropriate risk allocation. Further, the research study suggests that after the global financial crises, the private sector had less appetite to take the patronage risks in road and rail PPP projects. To mitigate these pitfalls, it is imperative that output specifications need to be aligned with the type of PPP projects they represent; in particular foreseeable changes should be addressed by some pre‐agreed framework to facilitate negotiation.

Originality/value

The significant contribution of this research is the identification of the common issues faced in drafting output specifications for Australian PPP projects. Stakeholders of future PPP projects should find the lessons useful for achieving value for money and appropriate risk transfer, stating the user requirements through clear and concise output specifications rather than input or prescriptive specifications in procuring social and economical PPP projects. Their relationships with facilities management are highlighted.

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Nicholas Nunnington and Barry Haynes

The aim of this paper is to consider the complex decision‐making process involved in corporate relocation and the validity of a tool designed to improve the objectivity…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to consider the complex decision‐making process involved in corporate relocation and the validity of a tool designed to improve the objectivity and strategic management of this process and to change the focus of the decision upon the strategic management objectives rather than the real estate deal.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors identify the progression of the decision‐making process; disaggregate components of that process; and evaluate a tool designed to improve the decision‐making process.

Findings

The size of the organisation can have a significant impact on the building evaluation and decision‐making process, smaller firms with less resources are more likely to make the relocation decision based on “gut feeling” rather than detailed evaluation. However, with increased transparency, accountability and corporate social responsibility, decisions based on more rigorous and objective approaches are being demanded. The evaluated tool facilitates a more objective approach and shifts the focus from a real estate to a business decision.

Practical implications

Corporate real estate managers can use the information to evaluate their own decision‐making processes against the framework of the tool and decide if it may be applicable to their context.

Originality/value

The paper fills a void by examining the decision‐making process from a fresh perspective, updates the thinking by providing a contemporary tool which has been beta tested with students and is about to be piloted with corporate clients.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 29 February 2008

Elcin Tas, Hakan Yaman and Leyla Tanacan

The research project called “Designing a building material relational database management system for Turkish construction sector”, aims to join “supply side” and “demand…

Abstract

Purpose

The research project called “Designing a building material relational database management system for Turkish construction sector”, aims to join “supply side” and “demand side” in the same environment that works on the subject of building material information in the Turkish construction sector. The paper aims to discuss the project findings.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from the information supplied and demanded from the points of sources, levels and frequency of updating by the help of the questionnaires conducted. The data gathered were integrated into the pre‐construction stage and used in the analysis of the process as to how this information was used by the “demand side” for building material information. IDEF‐0, a structured methodology for functional process analysis, is used to figure out building material evaluation and selection processes in the pre‐construction stage.

Findings

Material evaluation and selection process for the pre‐construction stage is figured out. Behaviors and requirements of demand‐side and supply‐side in building material information is studied. Difficulties in supplying and presenting building material information in Turkey are evaluated.

Originality/value

Although the subject of the paper is well‐known, Turkish practices and problems are evaluated, and an alternative model is suggested for the Turkish construction sector.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2020

Martina Baglio, Sara Perotti, Fabrizio Dallari and Elisabetta Rachele Garagiola

Logistics real estate has been experiencing a recent rebirth led by the growth of retailing and e-commerce. Although these sectors are looking for facilities matching…

Abstract

Purpose

Logistics real estate has been experiencing a recent rebirth led by the growth of retailing and e-commerce. Although these sectors are looking for facilities matching their logistics needs, the identification of the most suitable building becomes a challenging task. To date, from both the practitioner’s and academic perspectives there is a lack of models for assessing the quality of logistics facilities together with functionality (i.e. whether a warehouse is suitable for hosting a given logistics activity). The purpose of this paper is to fill this gap by developing a rating model for assessing the quality and functionality of logistics facilities.

Design/methodology/approach

A three-pronged methodology was adopted. First, a Systematic Literature Network Analysis (SLNA) was carried out to identify the relevant features that must be taken into consideration when assessing logistics real estate. Second, a Delphi method involving experts in the field was used to fine-tune the list of features that emerged from the SLNA process and to evaluate the importance of each feature from a company perspective. The rating model was developed and validated through pilot tests on 27 logistics facilities.

Findings

The rating model is divided into four sections: location, technical specifications, external spaces and internal areas. As an output, the model determines the building quality and main functionality, together with a gap analysis to detect the weakest emerging elements.

Originality/value

This research fills an identified research gap in the logistics real estate literature. Specifically, it offers a quantitative and shared evaluation method, which can be used to estimate building quality and functionality, thus extending the scope of the previous assessment methods available.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Margarida Jerónimo Barbosa, Pieter Pauwels, Victor Ferreira and Luís Mateus

Building information modeling (BIM) is most often used for the construction of new buildings. By using BIM in such projects, collaboration among stakeholders in an…

Abstract

Purpose

Building information modeling (BIM) is most often used for the construction of new buildings. By using BIM in such projects, collaboration among stakeholders in an architecture, engineering and construction project is improved. To even further improve collaboration, there is a move toward the production and usage of BIM standards in various countries. These are typically national documents, including guides, protocols, and mandatory regulations, that introduce guidelines about what information should be exchanged at what time between which partners and in what formats. If a nation or a construction team agrees on these guidelines, improved collaboration can come about on top of the collaboration benefits induced by the mere usage of BIM. This scenario might also be targeted for interventions in existing buildings. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the authors investigate the general content and usage of existing BIM standards for new constructions, describing specifications about BIM deliverable documents, modeling, and collaboration procedures. The authors suggest to what extent the content in the BIM standards can also be used for interventions in existing buildings. These suggestions rely heavily on literature study, supported by on-site use case experiences.

Findings

From this research, the authors can conclude that the existing standards give a solid basis for BIM collaboration in existing building interventions, but that they need to be extended in order to be of better use in any intervention project in an existing building. This extension should happen at: data modeling level: other kinds of data formats need to be considered, coming from terrestrial laser scanning and automatic digital photogrammetry tools; at data exchange level: exchange requirements should take explicit statements about modeling tolerances and levels of (un)certainty; and at process modeling level: business process models should include information exchange processes from the very start of the building survey (BIM→facility management→BIM or regular audit).

Originality/value

BIM environments are not often used to document existing buildings or interventions in existing buildings. The authors propose to improve the situation by using BIM standards and/or guidelines, and the authors give an initial overview of components that should be included in such a standard and/or guideline.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

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