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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2021

Zul-Atfi Bin Ismail

The contemporary practice of conventional maintenance for industrialised building system (IBS) constructions suffers from poor service delivery and defect repetition. A…

363

Abstract

Purpose

The contemporary practice of conventional maintenance for industrialised building system (IBS) constructions suffers from poor service delivery and defect repetition. A key problem impeding the widespread adoption of emerging technologies is the lack of competent contractors to support the effectiveness of the technology implemented in conventional methods and to ensure returns on investment. The shortcomings of conventional methods are assessed from the perspective of IBS buildings. This paper aims to identify the different system approach using Building Information Modelling (BIM) technology that is equipped with decision making processes.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes the establishment of key problem areas, the elements involved in implementing good practice and the requirements for integrating maintenance management processes and information databases in the maintenance management system.

Findings

Conventional methods have little emphasis on defect diagnosis tools. They also enhance inadequate strategic decision-making in the analysis of information when attempting to improve the maintenance project outcomes for IBS construction. The characteristics identified in a case study of IBS buildings are presented and analysed.

Originality/value

The conclusions and recommendations drawn from the analysis of the IBS case study are discussed, synthesised and deliberated upon. The approach presented in this paper integrates various aspects of building information modelling technology to facilitate improved execution of IBS maintenance activities.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Zaid Alwan and Barry J. Gledson

The purpose of this paper is to provide a unique conceptual framework for integrated asset management strategy that includes making use of available facility assessment…

1427

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a unique conceptual framework for integrated asset management strategy that includes making use of available facility assessment methods and tools such as BREEAM In-Use, and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED); and highlights proposes areas of commonality between these and the use of as-built Building Information Modelling, that ultimately becomes the Asset Information Model (AIM). This framework will consider the emerging requirements for the capture of Building Performance Attribute Data (BPAD), and how these can be managed in order to assist with effective post-construction building performance evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the current process relevant to the development of as-built BIMs and AIMs was undertaken which included a discussion of BIM standards and of the COBie process. This was combined with data provided by industry practitioners. This led to the concept of BPADs being developed, to be used within existing green building tool, BREEAM In-Use, COBIE and FM/Asset management methods. In turn these methodologies were used to identify possible synergies and areas of integration in AIM-enabled environments.

Findings

Recognising the cyclical nature of asset management and BIM, a conceptual model was generated. It was found that BPADs could be aggregated within an AIM model which could influence the delivery of effective facilities and asset management. The model considers the use of existing Building Management Systems (BMS) and Computer Aided Facility Management Systems (CAFMs) and identifies issues associated with the overall sustainability strategy.

Originality/value

A conceptual framework is generated that proposes the use of effective information management and aggregation of BPAD within an AIM.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

Richard Renaud and Sarah Phillips

Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) is the federal department responsible for housing over 190,000 Canadian federal public servants. During Y2K…

Abstract

Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) is the federal department responsible for housing over 190,000 Canadian federal public servants. During Y2K preparations, it became apparent that a single source or form of integrated, emergency response information at the infrastructure level did not exist. A process had to be created and developed that would serve as a single vehicle and source for building‐based emergency response. These preparations for Y2K saw the creation of the Infrastructure Continuity Unit (ICU) and a system for the creation, validation, and maintenance of Infrastructure Continuity Plans (ICPs). An ICP is an event‐management document that contains a series of procedures and protocols to be used during a building‐based incident or disruption of services. The ICU is supported nationally by a network of Regional Coordinators who oversee the gathering of information needed to create ICPs for their own parts of the country. This paper demonstrates how this system, along with the ICU’s recent certification by the Canadian General Standards Board (CGSB) to the ISO 9000 standard, have contributed to the ICU’s success. This paper takes the reader through an in‐depth exploration of the ICU’s processes, methodologies and procedures and demonstrates why, in a post‐September 11th world, the ICU has begun to attract international attention.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2019

Nadeeshani Wanigarathna, Keith Jones, Adrian Bell and Georgios Kapogiannis

This paper aims to investigate how digital capabilities associated with building information modelling (BIM) can integrate a wide range of information to improve built

1448

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how digital capabilities associated with building information modelling (BIM) can integrate a wide range of information to improve built asset management (BAM) decision-making during the in-use phase of hospital buildings.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive document analysis and a participatory case study was undertaken with a regional NHS hospital to review the type of information that can be used to better inform BAM decision-making to develop a conceptual framework to improve information use during the health-care BAM process, test how the conceptual framework can be applied within a BAM division of a health-care organisation and develop a cloud-based BIM application.

Findings

BIM has the potential to facilitate better informed BAM decision-making by integrating a wide range of information related to the physical condition of built assets, resources available for BAM and the built asset’s contribution to health-care provision within an organisation. However, interdepartmental information sharing requires a significant level of time and cost investment and changes to information gathering and storing practices within the whole organisation.

Originality/value

This research demonstrated that the implementation of BIM during the in-use phase of hospital buildings is different to that in the design and construction phases. At the in-use phase, BIM needs to integrate and communicate information within and between the estates, facilities division and other departments of the organisation. This poses a significant change management task for the organisation’s information management systems. Thus, a strategically driven top-down organisational approach is needed to implement BIM for the in-use phase of hospital buildings.

Article
Publication date: 7 February 2019

Manish K. Dixit, Varusha Venkatraj, Mohammadreza Ostadalimakhmalbaf, Fatemeh Pariafsai and Sarel Lavy

The purpose of this study is to investigate factors that impede the integration of facilities management (FM) into building information modeling (BIM) technology. The use…

3674

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate factors that impede the integration of facilities management (FM) into building information modeling (BIM) technology. The use of BIM technology in the commercial construction industry has grown enormously in recent years. Its application to FM, however, is still limited. The literature highlights issues that hinder BIM–FM integration, which are studied and discussed in detail in this paper.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of literature is conducted to identify and categorize key issues hampering the application of BIM to FM. This paper has also designed a questionnaire based on a literature review and surveyed FM professionals at two industry events. Using the collected responses, these issues are analyzed and discussed using non-parametric statistical analyses.

Findings

A total of 16 issues are identified through the literature review of 54 studies under the four categories of BIM-execution and information-management, technological, cost-based and legal and contractual issues. The results of the survey of FM professionals (with 57 complete responses) reveal that the single most important issue is the lack of FM involvement in project phases when BIM is evolving.

Originality/value

The findings of this study could assist the construction industry (e.g. building-material and equipment manufacturers, design professionals, general contractors, construction managers, owners and facility managers) with creating guidelines that would help in BIM–FM integration. BIM is a virtual database that contains important design and construction information, which can be used for effective and efficient life cycle management if building data are captured completely and accurately with a facility manager’s involvement.

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Ya Wen, Llewellyn C.M. Tang and Daniel C.W. Ho

This paper aims to propose a space-oriented solution as an interface enabling the knowledge transfer between the building and the facilities management (FM) industry.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a space-oriented solution as an interface enabling the knowledge transfer between the building and the facilities management (FM) industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The research gap is explored based on practical investigations in six large-scale hospitals in China. The theory of engineering systems integration inspires the proposed solution. A practical scenario is demonstrated to explain the workflow of this solution.

Findings

It is founded that lagging information updates of FM systems in hospital project are one of the main reasons for inefficient and costly FM workflow. Building information modelling (BIM) model could provide accurate building information to the FM systems at the building handover stage. However, few researchers focus on the continuous information transfer solution from the BIM model to FM systems during the building in-use phase. An interface should be established for the “conversation” between the frequent changes of building and the FM systems in the post-construction period.

Practical implications

The information updates in three FM systems due to space changes in a hospital project is considered as a practical scenario in this paper. It is presented with the workflow and the data logic chain.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper is to propose a solution to integrate the space information provided by the BIM model with the parameters of particular FM systems. This solution deploys a BIM model for the FM industry. The solution could allow the FM personnel to ease operations and maintenance workflow by updating the space information in the BIM model.

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2021

Nikdokht Ghadiminia, Mohammad Mayouf, Sharon Cox and Jan Krasniewicz

Building information modelling (BIM) creates a golden thread of information of the facility, which proves useful to those with the malicious intent of breaching the…

Abstract

Purpose

Building information modelling (BIM) creates a golden thread of information of the facility, which proves useful to those with the malicious intent of breaching the security of the facility. A cyber-attack incurs adverse implications for the facility and its managing organisation. Hence, this paper aims to unravel the impact of a cybersecurity breach, by developing a BIM-facilities management (FM) cybersecurity-risk-matrix to portray what a cybersecurity attack means for various working areas of FM.

Design/methodology/approach

This study commenced with exploring cybersecurity within various stages of a BIM project. This showcased a heightened risk of cybersecurity at the post-occupancy phase. Hence, thematic analysis of two main domains of BIM-FM and cybersecurity in the built environment led to the development of a matrix that illustrated the impact of a cybersecurity attack on a BIM-FM organisation.

Findings

Findings show that the existing approaches to the management of cybersecurity in BIM-FM are technology-dependent, resulting in an over-reliance on technology and a lack of cybersecurity awareness of aspects related to people and processes. This study sheds light on the criticality of cyber-risk at the post-occupancy phase, highlighting the FM areas which will be compromised as a result of a cyber-attack.

Originality/value

This study seeks to shift focus to the people and process aspects of cybersecurity in BIM-FM. Through discussing the interconnections between the physical and digital assets of a built facility, this study develops a cyber-risk matrix, which acts as a foundation for empirical investigations of the matter in future research.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 October 2018

Xiaozhi Ma, Albert P.C. Chan, Hengqin Wu, Feng Xiong and Na Dong

Although various concepts and techniques are introduced to the built environment to achieve a substantially efficient building production, the effective application of…

Abstract

Purpose

Although various concepts and techniques are introduced to the built environment to achieve a substantially efficient building production, the effective application of these methods in projects is of immense significance to the field of building construction. Among these initiatives, lean construction and building information modelling (BIM) are mainstream endeavours that share many common principles to improve the productivity of the built environment. This study aims to explore and explain how BIM-based integrated data management (IDM) facilitates the achievement of leanness in a built environment project.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is conducted through an ethnographic-action research that relies on the design-science approach and case study through a collaborative research project. As participants of the project, the researchers of this study cooperate with the practitioners to design the project approach and production workflows. Research data and evidence are obtained via participative observation, including direct observation, results of activities, unstructured meetings and self-analysis.

Findings

In this study, the project and production perspectives clarify the building design and production process, as well as analyse how BIM facilitates the achievement of leanness in building design and construction. BIM-based frameworks for IDM have been developed to handle miscellaneous information and data, as well as enhance multidisciplinary collaboration throughout the project life cycle. The role of the integrated BIM model as an information hub between the building design and building construction has been identified.

Research/limitations implications

The project and production views of building and construction are used in this study because the research purpose is to link the BIM-based IDM to lean construction. Although this mixed approach can slightly undermine the theoretical foundation of this study, a substantially comprehensive understanding can be gained as well.

Practical implications

This study provides a new perspective to understand how BIM-based IDM contributes to lean construction.

Originality/value

This study provides new insights into IDM in a built environment project with project and production views and presents BIM-based frameworks for IDM to achieve lean construction through the BIM process.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 December 2018

Zul-Atfi Ismail

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the development of an integrated computerised maintenance management system to improve the information storage of design and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the development of an integrated computerised maintenance management system to improve the information storage of design and construction, diagnostic and defect risk assessments on IBS building through the integration of building information modelling (BIM).

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used interviews with the IBS building client/maintenance contractor in Malaysia to gather information about maintenance management problems, approaches to address problems, information and communication technology implementation and use of emerging technologies, in addition to prototyping a system development life cycle for system development.

Findings

Relevant process flowchart documents of system development were obtained from the case study and reviewed to assist in providing an automation technique for decision-making and structural defect diagnostic operation through the integration of Visual Basic.Net, MS Access and Autodesk Revit software.

Originality/value

This research focuses on automatic bidirectional communications between an Expert System and BIM on a database level. Adoption of the approaches suggested in the research will enable the system to promote the development of zero IBS building maintenance.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 June 2020

Majid Parchami Jalal, Tayebe Yavari Roushan, Esmatullah Noorzai and Maryam Alizadeh

This study aims at introducing a claim management model based on building information modeling (BIM) for claims that can be visualized in BIM models.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims at introducing a claim management model based on building information modeling (BIM) for claims that can be visualized in BIM models.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the results of a questionnaire survey, 10 claims were identified as claims that can be visualized in BIM models (named hard claims in this study). Then, a BIM-based claim management model was developed and used in a case study.

Findings

A BIM-based claim management model is represented. The claim management process through this model consists of four steps: (1) extracting project information, identifying conditions prone to claim and storing them into a relational database, (2) automatically connecting the database to building information model, (3) simulation of the claims in building information model and (4) final calculations and report.

Practical implications

The proposed model can provide benefits to parties involved in a claim, such as early identification of potential claims, large space for data storage, facilitated claim management processes, information consistency and improved collaboration.

Originality/value

There are a few studies on providing solutions to claim management based on BIM process. Hence, the original contribution of this paper is the attempt to set a link between BIM and claim management processes.

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