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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Goh Choon Hua, Willy Sher and Low Sui Pheng

Studies on communication in the construction industry have generally concentrated on the briefing process and the construction process. However, studies on communication…

Abstract

Purpose

Studies on communication in the construction industry have generally concentrated on the briefing process and the construction process. However, studies on communication problems experienced by building clients' and maintenance contractors' representatives in the field of facilities management are less common. Thus, there is a need for studies of effective communication in facilities management, particularly between building clients' and maintenance contractors' representatives as these provide a valuable contribution to the area. Aims to fultil this need.

Design/methodology/approach

A maintenance contracting organization and four of its clients were selected for this research. A total of 44 project participants from the building clients and a maintenance contractor were interviewed in Singapore.

Findings

The findings suggested that, for effective communication, project participants have to be continuously proactive, even though communication may initially be ineffective. Reactive responses will result in ineffective communication at a later stage, even though communication may initially be effective.

Research limitations/implications

The study identified two additional areas for further research that are mainly related to facilities management. These are modes of communication and communication distance between building users and craftsmen.

Practical implications

The research documented in this paper investigates the factors affecting effective communication between building clients and maintenance contractors. A better understanding of these factors would help to reduce miscommunication and enhance productivity and working relationships.

Originality/value

The study showed that advanced information communication technology helped to overcome some of the communication barriers between the stakeholders in different stages of the lifecycle of a building. However, with building maintenance, proactive responses were encouraged to improve communication between facilities managers and other stakeholders, such as end users.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Andrea Ofori‐Boadu, De‐Graft Owusu‐Manu, David Edwards and Gary Holt

Traditional management systems sometimes struggle to meet the unique demands of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) projects. Consequently, contractors

Abstract

Purpose

Traditional management systems sometimes struggle to meet the unique demands of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) projects. Consequently, contractors have to modify their management practices. The purpose of this paper is to explore the management practices necessary to achieve successful implementation of LEED projects.

Design/methodology/approach

LEED project management practices implemented by six US contractors from the Top 100 Green Contractors list published by the Engineering News and Record, were analysed using structured case study interviews. An additional case study probed management practices implemented on a LEED‐GOLD project.

Findings

Findings support the implementation of management practices classified using the six Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award criteria of leadership, strategic planning, customer focus, measurement, analysis and knowledge management, workforce focus and operation focus.

Research limitations/implications

The qualitative study was based on a limited number of participant organizations. A subsequent quantitative study might provide generalizeable metrics for the green building industry. Further research on the cost effectiveness of the identified management practices is recommended.

Practical implications

This study provides an intuitive framework in the form of discourse on management practices to enhance the success of LEED projects. Contractors may consider the study's recommendations in order to increase their success on such projects.

Originality/value

The need to harmonize management practices with sustainable development has sparked the interest of researchers and practitioners. The study should be of utility to LEED contractors, environmental agencies, governments, educators, and other relevant stakeholders.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2020

Marc van den Berg, Hans Voordijk and Arjen Adriaanse

The purpose of this study is to explore how demolition contractors coordinate project activities for buildings at their end-of-life. The organizations are thereby…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how demolition contractors coordinate project activities for buildings at their end-of-life. The organizations are thereby conceptualized as information processing systems facing uncertainty.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple-case study methodology was selected to gain in-depth insights from three projects with different end-of-life strategies: a faculty building (material recycling), a nursing home (component reuse) and a psychiatric hospital (element reuse). Using a theory elaboration approach, the authors sought to explain how and why demolition contractors process information for end-of-life coordination.

Findings

End-of-life strategies differ in the degree of building, workflow and environmental uncertainty posed to the demolition contractor. Whether or not a strategy is effective depends on the (mis)match between the specific levels of uncertainty and the adopted coordination mechanisms.

Research limitations/implications

The explanatory account on end-of-life coordination refines information processing theory for the context of (selective) demolition projects.

Practical implications

The detailed case descriptions and information processing perspective enable practitioners to select, implement and reflect on coordination mechanisms for demolition/deconstruction projects at hand.

Originality/value

Reflecting its dual conceptual-empirical and inductive-deductive focus, this study contributes with new opportunities to explain building end-of-life coordination with a refined theory.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

CHEE H. WONG, GARY D. HOLT and PHIL HARRIS

The ‘lowest‐price wins’ philosophy has been a consistent theme of contractor selection over the years. To comprehensively elucidate this selection preference and compare…

Abstract

The ‘lowest‐price wins’ philosophy has been a consistent theme of contractor selection over the years. To comprehensively elucidate this selection preference and compare it with the use of a multi‐criteria selection (MCS) approach in the tenderer evaluation process, this paper investigates MCS tender price selection preferences. That is, project‐specific criteria (PSC) and lowest‐price wins selection practices of UK construction clients, in both building and civil engineering works at in detail via results of the empirical survey. The investigation provides further insight into the evaluation of contractors' attributes (i.e. PSC). Levels of importance assigned (LIA) for each criterion were analysed (i.e. quantitative analysis of the differences in opinions and, variance amongst the respondents) in a multivariate statistical method. Importance attached by construction clients to the ‘lowest‐price wins’ philosophy is also presented. Contrast was made between the MCS approach and the ‘lowest‐price wins’ option amongst the surveyed construction clients. It was found that increased awareness of the use of PSC prevailed amongst the survey construction clients. This indicated that cost has to be tempered with the evaluation of PSC and the attempt of construction clients searching for a new evaluation paradigm (i.e. adoption of MCS approach rather than basing on the lowest‐price wins alone).

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 28 April 2020

Abdulmalik Sa'eed, Nuru Gambo, Ibrahim Ibrahim Inuwa and Innocent Musonda

The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of financial management practices of small-scale building contractors on the technical performance of the contractors in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of financial management practices of small-scale building contractors on the technical performance of the contractors in the northern part of Nigeria with international best practices. Previous studies argued that the technical performance of small-scale building contractors in developing countries is poor because of insufficient cash to acquire strategic resources at the outset of a project. This continues to pose a challenge to the sustainable development of the construction industry, particularly in developing countries like Nigeria. There is, therefore, a need to identify, assess and compare the effects of financial practices of the contractors with technical performance best practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The technical performance of each contractor was evaluated using a five-point Likert scale. This is used to obtain the mean technical performance levels of the contractors. A questionnaire survey was administered to the professionals in the industry who were selected by using a proportionate stratified random sampling technique. The contractors’ performance was compared using ANOVA with post hoc, and the effects of contractors’ financial management practices were determined using multiple regression analysis.

Findings

The results of this study indicated that the contractors in Nigeria were average technical performers and there were large effects of financial management practices on the technical performance of contractors in building projects.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to small-scale building contractors in northeast Nigeria. One of the implications of this study is that it provides the criteria for an evaluation of small-scale building contractors’ technical performance in Nigeria and other developing countries that faced similar problems.

Practical implications

The practical implications of this study are that it establishes the current level of contractors' technical performance and serves as an awareness of contractors' current financial practices.

Social implications

This study created bases for self-evaluation of contractors’ technical performance and competition among small-scale contractors in Nigeria for the enhancement of productivity particularly in rural areas for national development.

Originality/value

This study emanated from the government reports and past studies in the area of performance management based on the persistence of poor technical performance of small-scale contractors in the construction industry.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction , vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Encon Y.Y. Hui

Identifies major issues related to building management in the context of large and dense residential estates. Aims to understand the relationship between the owners and…

Abstract

Purpose

Identifies major issues related to building management in the context of large and dense residential estates. Aims to understand the relationship between the owners and the building management company and determine the keys to success for building management in large and dense residential estates.

Design/methodology/approach

Field interviews are conducted with the management committees of three residential estates. Semi‐structured questions are asked. A model of service quality is applied in the context of building management.

Findings

A framework of the context of building management is constructed. The relationship among the management committee and the building management company is a partnership. Guidelines for narrowing possible service gaps in the process of building management are proposed. Key success factors of building management are identified.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size is small. This study reflects the field practice of outsourced building management of a few large and dense residential estates in Hong Kong. Further validation is necessary elsewhere.

Practical implications

This is a useful source of information for building owners and service providers to effectively implement building management.

Originality/value

The context of building management is graphically represented. The gap model of service quality is applied in the study of the process of service delivery of building management.

Details

Facilities, vol. 23 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

C.W. Kam and S.L. Tang

Quality assurance (QA) has been adopted by the public construction sectors in Asia since the introduction of ISO 9000 quality standards in 1987. The Governments of…

Abstract

Quality assurance (QA) has been adopted by the public construction sectors in Asia since the introduction of ISO 9000 quality standards in 1987. The Governments of Singapore and Hong Kong have designed a series of quality infrastructure to promote, develop and improve the quality management system in the construction industry. Highlights the rapid development of quality systems in Singapore and Hong Kong, and the implementation of the construction quality assessment system (CONQUAS) in Singapore. Examines the performance assessment scoring system (PASS) in Hong Kong to assess the quality of building works. Discusses and compares the incentives for the construction sectors to achieve the ISO 9000 certification in both cities.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 14 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Yongtao Tan, Liyin Shen, Craig Langston, Weisheng Lu and Michael C.H. Yam

Thie purpose of this paper is to present the critical success factors (CSFs) for engaging in the building maintenance business in Hong Kong where maintenance is a major…

Abstract

Purpose

Thie purpose of this paper is to present the critical success factors (CSFs) for engaging in the building maintenance business in Hong Kong where maintenance is a major market sector.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, CSFs are identified for the business of building maintenance based on data collected from a questionnaire survey and interviews.

Findings

A total of 12 CSFs are identified, such as client's satisfaction, certification of company, reliability of service, quality of service, and company reputation, and most are related to two principal factors, namely maintenance service and organization, and project management.

Originality/value

This paper provides a review of building maintenance in Hong Kong and identifies a list of success factors for the business of building maintenance. The identified CSFs and principal factors provide useful reference for maintenance contractors to have a clear understanding of the expectations of the building maintenance market in Hong Kong.

Details

Facilities, vol. 32 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

AKINTOLA AKINTOYE and EAMON FITZGERALD

Design and build has increased in its use for construction procurement in recent times. However, its performance as a procurement method has been widely criticized by…

Abstract

Design and build has increased in its use for construction procurement in recent times. However, its performance as a procurement method has been widely criticized by professionals in the construction industry. This paper reports a survey of 40 architects, using a structured questionnaire to investigate the performance of contractor‐led design and build in project procurement. Although 20% of architects' private sector workload (and 8% of public sector) is derived from D&B, they perceive this procurement type to involve sacrificing product quality and design innovation. Where clients insist on a choice of D&B, architects generally prefer the use of either novation D&B or develop and construct, rather than ‘traditional’ D&B.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2020

Nicholas Chileshe, Neema Kavishe and David John Edwards

This study aims to investigate and ranks the critical factors influencing the bid or no-bid decision and their importance for the indigenous small building contractors

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate and ranks the critical factors influencing the bid or no-bid decision and their importance for the indigenous small building contractors within the Tanzanian construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretivist epistemological design was adopted to extensively manually review and search extant literature on bid or no-bid decision-making criteria. A total of 30 most common bid or no-bid decision-making criteria were identified. These were included in a questionnaire survey data collection instrument. The survey was distributed to 40 small indigenous (local) building contractors in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. In total, 33 responses were received. Response data was subjected to both descriptive and inferential statistics.

Findings

The results show a disparity of ranking of the 30 bid/no-bid criteria factors among the two grades of small contractors, with 11 factors having statistically significant differences (p = < 0.05). Based on the overall sample, the most highly ranked seven factors in ascending order were: availability of capital; financial capacity of the client; project size; profitability; project type; need of work; and current workload. The following were the least ranked: tax liability; the degree of safety; availability of other projects; availability of labor; bidding document price; and uncertainty because of weather conditions. Availability of capital and financial capacity of the client were jointly ranked as the most important by Class VI contractors. In comparison, availability of capital and need of study were rated highly for Class VII contractors.

Research limitations/implications

The sample consisted of indigenous small building contractors in one industry operating in Tanzania only and did not include the perceptions of the foreign contractors based in Dar es Salaam. Future studies are required to expand the current research and investigate this specific aspect further.

Practical implications

The identified “bid/no-bid criteria” information will allow indigenous small building contractors to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of their bidding decision-making process. Emergent findings will enable said contractors to: better fit into the competitive construction business environment; increase their awareness of existing decision-making practices; and develop appropriate strategies for evaluation of opportunities encountered. Cumulatively, these findings benefit small indigenous building contractors by increasing their understanding of the factors influencing bid decision.

Originality/value

The study represents the first empirical study in Tanzania on the critical factors influencing the bid or no-bid decision among the indigenous small building contractors, which face fierce competition from foreign contractors.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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