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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Bruce Stoffel and Jim Cunningham

To determine the extent and nature of library involvement in campus portal development.

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Abstract

Purpose

To determine the extent and nature of library involvement in campus portal development.

Design/methodology/approach

Campus technology staff from US colleges and universities participating in the JA‐SIG uPortal open‐source software project were surveyed.

Findings

All respondents indicated having an active campus portal. A majority of respondents had at least one library feature on their campus portal. Some library features included automated display of information specific to the portal user such as library account information. Collaboration between campus and library staff was a common theme among institutions successfully deploying library features.

Research limitations/implications

Findings are based on a small sample of campuses currently deploying portals. Recommended follow‐up studies include surveys of institutions using proprietary portal software and surveys of library staff and end‐users.

Originality/value

While considerable research has been done on library portals, this paper is unique in its exploration of library participation in broader campus portal initiatives. Portal features discussed and illustrated in this paper might serve as models for libraries interested in developing a presence on their campus portal.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Bruce Stoffel and Toni Tucker

In fall 2002, Illinois State University librarians surveyed their e‐mail and chat reference patrons to determine how they feel about the services and how the services…

2708

Abstract

In fall 2002, Illinois State University librarians surveyed their e‐mail and chat reference patrons to determine how they feel about the services and how the services might be improved. The survey also attempted to identify the extent to which the services are used in conjunction with more traditional reference venues. While most electronic reference services utilize brief “pop‐up” forms to survey patrons, Illinois State patrons were invited via e‐mail to complete a more extensive online survey form. Approximately 400 patrons were surveyed, and a response rate of 17 percent was achieved. Results indicate a high level of satisfaction with electronic reference, the desirability of retaining both services despite the more immediate need of chat, and the need to cross‐market reference services. Survey participation suggests that use of e‐mail and online forms to survey electronic reference patrons may be effective in the case of e‐mail reference, but not chat.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1947

Under this title an interesting article by Thurman B. Rice, M.D., was published in the July issue of the Monthly Bulletin of the Indiana State Board of Health. Dr. Rice…

Abstract

Under this title an interesting article by Thurman B. Rice, M.D., was published in the July issue of the Monthly Bulletin of the Indiana State Board of Health. Dr. Rice tells us that it is customary in the U.S.A. for the Boards of Health to require certificates of health from all food handlers, and that a conscientious examiner would even refuse to issue a certificate if the applicant had eczematous hands or open sores on the hands or face. This seems a most excellent precaution and one which might well be studied with due consideration in this country. Unfortunately, certain unscrupulous physicians apparently overcome the inconvenience of giving a thorough examination, and cases are known where 140 blanks, certifying that as many persons were free from all transmissible disease, were signed in two hours—and also where pads of blanks have been signed and the names filled in later by the restaurant manager as employees began to work. After referring to the care and cleanliness required in the preparation of the food itself, Dr. Rice points out that, should a case of food poisoning occur, the health authorities should be informed immediately and all suspected foods should be interned and kept in a condition which will guarantee as little change as possible—usually refrigeration at a very low temperature. The layman, on hearing of a case of food poisoning, is very prone to suspect those articles of food consumed at the last previous meal—while the significant article may have been eaten a day, or more, before—or, in the case of typhoid fever, two weeks before. Dr. Rice continues by telling us that we should always remain in the most jovial of moods at the dining table, and that causes for anger, fear, disgust, or any other unpleasant major emotion should be avoided. Also complaining, nagging criticism and sarcastic remarks at the table are most injurious to the flow of the gastric juice. We refrain from comment upon the effect of the restaurant orchestra, which has at times, we feel sure, been the cause of much “ criticism and sarcastic remarks ”; also the most careful and jovial diner (even after reading Dr. Rice's article) surely cannot fail to stimulate a little “anger” at the waiter who served the latecomers at the adjoining table before his good self? As a means of preventing epidemics from food sources, Dr. Rice recommends cleanliness, character, intelligence and good health in the workers; adequate equipment, alertness and supervision from the management; and the practice of the principles of the modern science and art of epidemiology in the board of health.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 49 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2020

Futao Zhao and Zhong Yao

The purpose of this paper is to identify the impact factors that might influence audiences' voluntary donation to content creators on the online platforms, and to build an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the impact factors that might influence audiences' voluntary donation to content creators on the online platforms, and to build an effective prediction model by considering both content and creator-related features.

Design/methodology/approach

This study collected the real-world data of content consumption from Xueqiu.com and extracted both content and creator characteristics from the data set. The best donation prediction model based on such features was determined by evaluating four prevalent classifiers with various performance metrics. Furthermore, three feature selection methods were applied to validate the robustness of the constructed model, and then the predictability of different feature groups was examined. Finally, we conducted an interpretive analysis to identify relatively important predictors.

Findings

The experimental results show that the random classifier with all extracted features outperformed other built models and achieved excellent performance, indicating the usefulness of these factors in predicting the donations. Moreover, the predictability of content features was demonstrated to be relatively better than that of creator ones. Finally, several particularly important predictors were identified such as the number of modal particles in the article.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to investigate what factors might drive customers' voluntary donation to content contributors on social websites. Different from previous studies focusing on live video streaming, we expand the research vision by examining the donations to user-generated text content, calling for attention to other important topics in the burgeoning industry.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 120 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2019

Benjamin G. Serpell, Stephen Larkham and Christian J. Cook

Team effectiveness is often predicated by a group’s ability to communicate. However, the effect of stress response on communication success, particularly nonverbal…

Abstract

Purpose

Team effectiveness is often predicated by a group’s ability to communicate. However, the effect of stress response on communication success, particularly nonverbal engagement, and how this might affect team performance, is not clear; a “phenomenon” this study sought to explore.

Design/methodology/approach

This was an observational study in a cohort of professional rugby players. Participants gave presentations to their peers on two separate occasions during a “live-in” camp designed to have psychologically stressful elements. Presentations were video recorded and audience engagement was measured. Testosterone and cortisol were used as biomarkers of stress response, with a high testosterone–cortisol ratio considered positive. A team training session followed the presentations and participants were rated for training quality.

Findings

A small decline in testosterone was observed each day after waking. Conversely, cortisol rose after waking, with the rise being the highest on the first day. A decline in testosterone–cortisol ratio was also seen each day after waking; the decline was greatest on the first day. Presentation duration and audience engagement was greatest for the second presentation; when the testosterone-cortisol ratio decline and the cortisol increase after waking was smaller. Training quality was also better that day. Pooled data revealed a moderate inverse relationship and weak positive relationships for audience engagement with post-meeting cortisol and post-meeting testosterone–cortisol ratio, respectively. Training quality was related to testosterone and testosterone–cortisol ratio, but inversely related to cortisol.

Originality/value

This study suggests that in stressful conditions, as suggested by an awakening hormone response, communication and team performance could become compromised with reduced ability to engage with others.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2017

Goran Sladić, Igor Cverdelj-Fogaraši, Stevan Gostojić, Goran Savić, Milan Segedinac and Miroslav Zarić

The purpose of this paper is to identify the benefits of an approach in which document management systems (DMSs) are based on a formal and explicit document model…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the benefits of an approach in which document management systems (DMSs) are based on a formal and explicit document model, primarily in terms of facilitating domain-specific customization.

Design/methodology/approach

Within this paper, a generic document model is proposed. The model consists of two layers. A general purpose layer, which represents common features of the documents, and a domain-specific layer, modeling properties particular to application domain. The general purpose layer is based on ISO 82045, providing high degree of interoperability with other systems developed with respect to this set of standard.

Findings

Splitting document model into the layers enables DMSs to be tailored for each particular domain of application, depending on the general purpose layer. The existence of domain-specific layer allows documents to be interpreted differently in different domains of application.

Practical implications

In order to enable customization of DMS for a particular domain, the implementation of domain-specific document layer is required. Also, the proposed model does not explicitly deal with document dynamics.

Originality/value

The proposed document ontology is general enough to provide the representation of documents not depending on a specific scope of application, yet flexible enough to enable extensions through which domain-specific document features can be expressed. The separation of document model enables development of core DMS offering services relying explicitly on the general purpose layer on one hand, as well as domain-specific customization of DMS on the other.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 73 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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