Search results

1 – 10 of 607
Article
Publication date: 11 April 2018

Hazel Hall, Peter Cruickshank and Bruce Ryan

The purpose of this paper is to report the results from a study that investigated the extent to which an intervention to develop a community of library and information science…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the results from a study that investigated the extent to which an intervention to develop a community of library and information science (LIS) researchers – the Developing Research Excellence and Methods (DREaM) project – was successful in meeting its main objective three years after its implementation. Of particular interest are factors that support or hinder network longevity.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by online survey/telephone and focus group. From quantitative data, a social network analysis (SNA) and network diagrams were generated. Focus group discussions were recorded and transcribed, and data from these were analysed manually.

Findings

Three years after the end of its formal funding period, DREaM endured as a loose but persistent network. Social ties were more important than work ties, and network members with the highest network centrality held roles in academic institutions. Physical proximity between members was important to the maintenance of network ties. Actor status did not appear to have a bearing on network centrality.

Research limitations/implications

Discussion is limited to consideration of community development amongst core members of the network only. The “manufactured” nature of the DREaM network and unique context in which it was formed have implications for the generalisibility of the findings reported.

Practical implications

Social infrastructure is key to the long-term health of a network initiative. Continued ad hoc support would strengthen it further.

Originality/value

The findings add to understanding of factors important to the development of scholarly and learning communities. They extend contributions of earlier work that has deployed SNA techniques in LIS research and research in other fields.

Article
Publication date: 18 November 2022

Hazel Hall, Bruce Martin Ryan, Rachel Salzano and Katherine Stephen

The purpose of the empirical study was to examine whether strategies shown to work well in one model of network development for library and information science (LIS) practitioners…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the empirical study was to examine whether strategies shown to work well in one model of network development for library and information science (LIS) practitioners and researchers could be applied successfully in the development of a new network and contribute to the narrowing of the research–practice gap in LIS.

Design/methodology/approach

Overall, 32 members of a new professional network were surveyed by a questionnaire following the completion of a programme of four network events held between 2019 and 2021.

Findings

The analysis demonstrates the transferability of the existing model of network development to a new network and that it can be successfully adapted for online delivery of network events and activities.

Practical implications

The criteria deployed for the evaluation of the new network could be used in other similar settings. Funding bodies can also use these findings as demonstration of the value of their investment in network grants.

Originality/value

This contribution on means of growing collaborative networks to narrow the LIS research–practice gap stands out in contrast with prior research that tends to focus the support of research productivity of academic librarians in North American universities for the purposes of career development. Here wider aspects of research engagement are considered of value for LIS practitioners from a range of sectors and institutions, beyond North America, for purposes that are broader than personal advancement.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 79 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 June 2019

Hazel Hall, Peter Cruickshank and Bruce Ryan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which learning gained through participation in three research methods workshops funded by an Arts and Humanities Research…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which learning gained through participation in three research methods workshops funded by an Arts and Humanities Research Council networking grant was applied in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by online survey and focus group from individuals who participated in the Developing Research Excellence and Methods (DREaM) project workshops in 2011/2012. The survey data were coded and analysed manually, as were the transcribed focus group discussions.

Findings

Following the conclusion of the DREaM project the participants at the core of the network applied their learning from the workshops to innovate in the workplace and to develop information services, with evident impact on end-users of library and information services. The strongest impact of the DREaM project, however, was found in reports of widened opportunities for the researcher and practitioner cadre members, many of which arose from collaborations. This provides evidence of a second proven strategy (in addition to the provision of research reports in practitioner publications) for narrowing the library and information science (LIS) research-practice gap: the creation of researcher-practitioner networks.

Research limitations/implications

Collaborative interactions between academic researchers and practitioners bring benefits to both network participants themselves and to the wider communities with which they interact. These are likely to be applicable across a range of subject domains and geographies.

Practical implications

Network grants are valuable for furnishing learning that may be applied in practice, and for bridging the research-practice gap.

Social implications

In LIS and other domains that suffer from a research-practice gap (e.g. teaching, social work, nursing, policing, management) the bringing together of researchers and practitioners in networks may address problems associated with misunderstandings between the two communities, and lead to improved services provision.

Originality/value

This study provides an evaluation of network development that goes beyond simply reporting changes in network topology. It does so by assessing the value that network relationships provide to individuals and groups, extending knowledge on mechanisms of collaborative interaction within research networks. It is also the first detailed study of the impact of a UK research council networking grant.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 75 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2014

Hue Thi Pham and Kerry Tanner

The purpose of this paper is to examine recent literature for a review of the concepts of collaboration in library and information science and related disciplines and to develop a…

2009

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine recent literature for a review of the concepts of collaboration in library and information science and related disciplines and to develop a conceptual framework for application in academic contexts globally.

Design/methodology/approach

An investigation of literature exploring the multifaceted meanings and dimensions of collaboration and subsequent development of a framework for analysis. To exemplify the use of the framework in analysing collaboration between academics and librarians, and to demonstrate the impact of context on collaboration, the paper explores the situation and educational contexts in two national settings – one a developed country (Australia) and the other a developing country (Vietnam).

Findings

Contextual factors have a substantial impact on the nature of collaboration between academics and librarians. The collaboration framework developed is applied to academic settings in two countries, Vietnam and Australia, and dimensions of collaboration are compared and contrasted in the two countries. Insights and implications are drawn concerning the distinctive features of effective collaboration as well as the achievements and challenges of such collaborative partnerships.

Research limitations/implications

This literature-based article reports on the first part of a larger research project. Further development and application of the conceptual framework in studying the collaborative relationship between academics and librarians empirically are deemed important.

Originality/value

This paper provides insights into the current condition and challenges in developing collaboration between academics and librarians. The proposed framework is beneficial to academics, librarians and universities interested in addressing the issues of this partnership in various academic contexts.

Details

Library Review, vol. 63 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1970

R.E. Thomas

Discusses research based on two sets of data, published ads and transcripts of interviews with chain interviews. Attempts to show that ‘status’ is a concept of value when…

Abstract

Discusses research based on two sets of data, published ads and transcripts of interviews with chain interviews. Attempts to show that ‘status’ is a concept of value when considering what indicators of consumer behaviour highlight opportunities for change in a distribution analysis. Analyses results leading to a brief theoretical discussion of short‐run adaptations of decision rules and the necessary condition for construction of logical flow simulation models. Concludes that the attempts here to stimulate selection of a single grocery item for a weekly chain ad produced a simple model, which had several causes giving simplicity.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/03090569010005787. When citing the…

450

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/03090569010005787. When citing the article, please cite: Robert W. Armstrong, Bruce W. Stening, John K. Ryans, Larry Marks, Michael Mayo, (1990), “International Marketing Ethics: Problems Encountered by Australian Firms”, European Journal of Marketing, Vol. 24 Iss: 10, pp. 5 - 18.

Details

Asia Pacific International Journal of Marketing, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7517

Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Vaughn Schmutz, Sarah H. Pollock and Jordan S. Bendickson

Previous research suggests that women receive less critical attention and acclaim in popular music. The authors expect that gender differences in the amount and content of media…

Abstract

Previous research suggests that women receive less critical attention and acclaim in popular music. The authors expect that gender differences in the amount and content of media discourse about popular musicians occur because music critics draw on the cultural frame of gender as a primary tool for critical evaluation. In order to explore the role of gender as a frame through which aesthetic content is evaluated, the authors conduct detailed content analyses of 53 critical reviews of two versions of the popular album 1989 – the original released by Taylor Swift in 2014 and a cover version released by Ryan Adams less than a year later. Despite Swift’s greater popularity and prominence, the authors find that reviews of her version of the album are more likely to focus on her gender and sexuality; less likely to describe her as emotionally authentic; and more likely to use popular aesthetic criteria in evaluating her music. By contrast, Ryan Adams was more likely to be seen by critics as emotionally authentic and to be described using high art aesthetic criteria and intellectualizing discourse. The authors address the implications of the findings for persistent gender gaps in many artistic fields.

Details

Gender and the Media: Women’s Places
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-329-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 November 2010

Peyina Lin

This paper aims to examine barriers to information literacy (IL), including: language use, social structures, and the neutrality‐advocacy dilemma.

3242

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine barriers to information literacy (IL), including: language use, social structures, and the neutrality‐advocacy dilemma.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper critical analysis is used to discuss: effect of language used on audience reach; cognitive locus assumptions in IL standards and oversight on structural factors; opportunities for libraries to overcome IL barriers. Arguments are substantiated with theories and research from sociology, psychology, and education.

Findings

Effective diffusion of IL depends on using common language and being relevant to learners. However, knowledge differences between librarians and the public can make finding common language challenging. Additionally, by assuming information illiteracy in people, the term may convey negative‐evaluation, which may negatively affect learners' sense of competence and motivation for learning, and result in ineffective learning. Extracurricular/civic activities in schools are rich settings for effective learning, but structural factors, often overlooked by proponents of IL, constrain students' opportunities for civic participation. Fortunately, the library provides a sense of relatedness to students and has the potential to support conditions for effective learning in civic contexts.

Research limitations/implications

Propositions have not been empirically tested in IL contexts.

Practical implications

The paper proposes ways to address barriers to information literacy and calls for empirical research.

Social implications

The paper legitimizes librarians to play advocacy roles for students' civic engagement.

Originality/value

No literature in information literacy examines in‐depth the effects of its language choice and cognitive locus on audience reach. This paper integrates theories from sociology, psychology, and education, to argue how language choice and social structures constrain IL attainment and proposes ways to address those barriers.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 July 2018

David Gunsberg, Bruce Callow, Brett Ryan, Jolyon Suthers, Penny Anne Baker and Joanna Richardson

The purpose of this paper is to identify the baseline model required to measure whole-of-organisation agility within a university information services division. The paper seeks to…

2753

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the baseline model required to measure whole-of-organisation agility within a university information services division. The paper seeks to analyse the process of identifying and applying such a model.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative methodology applied is that of a single case study. The organisation analysed was an Australian university’s information services division. A structured survey, based on Wendler (2014), was administered to all staff as part of a multi-phased approach, thus facilitating a triangulation process.

Findings

The current research has confirmed the applicability of Wendler’s model to the higher education information technology sector. Application of the model establishes not only a baseline agility maturity score across the whole-of-organisation but also provides granular scores based on organisational units. Triangulation of survey results is recommended to achieve a more in-depth perspective.

Research limitations/implications

Further research comparing similarly and differently sized universities could provide valuable insights. More research is needed to extend the applicability of Wendler’s model to a wider range of domains and industries.

Practical implications

The grouping of survey questions under particular broad themes reflected the strategic focus of the division being surveyed. Organisations implementing the proposed model will need to select themes that correspond with their respective strategic goals and culture.

Originality/value

The paper has extended the research and resultant model developed by Wendler by applying them not only to both managers and staff but also to a different domain, specifically higher education.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1990

Robert W. Armstrong, Bruce W. Stening, John K. Ryans, Larry Marks and Michael Mayo

The international marketing ethics problems encountered by arepresentative sample of Australian firms engaged in internationalbusiness are examined. The executive in charge of…

2153

Abstract

The international marketing ethics problems encountered by a representative sample of Australian firms engaged in international business are examined. The executive in charge of international marketing in 38 firms (a 25 per cent response rate) provided information on the types of ethical problems they have most commonly confronted. Bribery was overwhelmingly the most common ethical problem. In addition, a comparison is made between the Australian results and the results of a similar study conducted in the United States. This comparison reveals many striking similarities.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 24 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

1 – 10 of 607