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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2019

Bruce Rayton, Zeynep Y. Yalabik and Andriana Rapti

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between fit (organization and job) perceptions and work engagement (WE).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between fit (organization and job) perceptions and work engagement (WE).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors deployed a two-wave survey among 377 clerical employees of the specialist lending division of a large UK bank, with the waves separated by 12 months.

Findings

The results show a positive relationship between person organization (PO) and person job (PJ) fit perceptions (at Time 1) and WE (at Time 2). Job satisfaction (JS) and affective commitment (AC) dual-mediate these relationships. The effect of PO fit on WE manifests primarily via AC, while the effect of PJ fit manifests primarily via JS.

Practical implications

The study indicates that organizations should consider the fit of employees to their jobs and the organization when designing interventions intended to increase WE. Also, potential synergies exist between organizational interventions designed to influence employee attitudes focused on similar units of analysis: e.g., PJ fit with JS or PO fit with AC.

Originality/value

This study provides the first investigation of the dual-mediation, via JS and AC, of the effects of both PJ and PO fit on WE. Furthermore, the use of a time-lagged design strengthens the evidence for the novel hypotheses of this study and enables verification of findings in the extant literature.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Zeynep Yesim Yalabik, Bruce A. Rayton and Andriana Rapti

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the relationship between the facets of job satisfaction and the work engagement. Previous studies that focus on the linkages…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the relationship between the facets of job satisfaction and the work engagement. Previous studies that focus on the linkages between work engagement and overall job satisfaction ignore the multi-faceted nature of job satisfaction construct. In this study, how job satisfaction facets are linked to three dimensions of work engagement – i.e. vigor, dedication and absorption – is discussed by drawing on the social exchange theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The cross-lagged data used in this study come from the specialist lending division of a UK bank. The linear multiple regression analyses are run to test the proposed theoretical model.

Findings

The results show that among all the job satisfaction facets, the “satisfaction with work itself” is the key driver of all dimensions of work engagement, i.e. vigor, dedication and absorption. The “satisfaction with conditions” is negatively linked to absorption of employees in their work. This means that the employees with high workload might not be absorbed in their work. Finally, it is found that employees who are satisfied with the communication in their work are also absorbed in their work.

Originality/value

This study contributes to our knowledge of the drivers of work engagement over time. The facets of job satisfaction as the drivers help us to have a comprehensive understanding of the link between the job satisfaction facets and work engagement. This study first contributes to the work engagement literature which has neglected the multi-dimensional approach of job satisfaction. This study also contributes to the limited number of work engagement studies conducted in service sector and in UK.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2020

Dirk De Clercq, Muhammad Umer Azeem and Inam Ul Haq

This study investigates the connection between employees' dissatisfaction with the organizational status quo and their job performance, with a particular focus on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the connection between employees' dissatisfaction with the organizational status quo and their job performance, with a particular focus on the mediating role of their problem-focused voice behavior – through which they pinpoint possible causes of organizational problem situations – and the moderating role of their Machiavellianism.

Design/methodology/approach

Three-wave survey data were collected from employees and their supervisors in Pakistani organizations.

Findings

An important reason that employees' beliefs about organizational underperformance spur their own performance, as rated by supervisors, is that they spend significant energy expressing their concerns about shortcomings. The mediating role of such constructive voice behaviors is mitigated though, to the extent that employees have stronger Machiavellian tendencies.

Practical implications

For human resource managers, the findings reveal problem-focused voice as a key mechanism by which employees' negative perceptions about how well their organization fares can be channeled into higher job performance. They also elucidate how this process is less likely among employees who are self-centered and less concerned about their organization' well-being, such that they hold back pertinent information about organizational failures from others.

Originality/value

The study pinpoints problem-focused voice as an unexplored behavioral response by which employees' beliefs about organizational underperformance can enhance their job performance. It also details how the tendency of Machiavellian employees to stay away from such voice activities may backfire in the form of lower performance evaluations.

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Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2011

Jan Kees Looise, Nicole Torka and Jan Ekke Wigboldus

Last decades scholars in the field of human resource management (HRM) have intensely examined the contribution of HRM to organizational performance. Despite their efforts…

Abstract

Last decades scholars in the field of human resource management (HRM) have intensely examined the contribution of HRM to organizational performance. Despite their efforts, at least one major research shortcoming can be identified. In general, they have devoted far too little attention to an aspect of HRM potentially beneficial for organizational performance: worker participation, and especially its indirect or representative forms. In contrast, for academics embedded in the industrial relations tradition, worker participation is a prominent theme, even though less emphasized in its relationship with company objectives. One might defend traditional scholars' reservations by arguing that participations main goal concerns workplace democratization and not organizational prosperity. However, several writers state that industrial democracy involving worker participation can channel conflicts of interest between employees and employers and stimulate desired employee attitudes and behavior, consequently enhancing organizational performance (e.g., Gollan, 2006; Ramsay, 1991; Taras & Kaufman, 1999). And, indeed, several studies have shown positive effects of both direct participation (e.g., European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions, 1997) and indirect participation (e.g., Addison et al., 2000, 2003; Frick & Möller, 2003) on organizational performance.

Nevertheless, to date, the absence of an integrated model explaining the connection between worker participation and organizational performance leads to the following question that still is in need of an answer: how do direct and indirect forms of participation – separate as well as in combination – affect organizational performance? This chapter aims to contribute to the filling of the aforementioned knowledge gaps. In so doing, we focus on direct and indirect, nonunion participation on the firm level, using a Western European and especially Dutch frame of reference.

Details

Advances in Industrial and Labor Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-907-4

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Sun-Young Park, Choong-Ki Lee and Hyesun Kim

The purpose of this paper is to examine how employees’ perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) influence their work engagement (WE), innovative behavior (IB…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how employees’ perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) influence their work engagement (WE), innovative behavior (IB) and intention to stay (IS) with their company, to illuminate the role of CSR at the individual employee level.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this study are responses of 455 employees to an online survey at the largest travel company in South Korea. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling in Mplus 7.3 are used to analyze the data.

Findings

Results show that employee perceptions of CSR regarding customers and employees significantly and positively influence their WE, which in turn positively influence their IB and IS. Moreover, WE mediates these relationships.

Research limitations/implications

Results of this study may not represent the entire travel industry or the country. This study’s model should be tested in other companies and countries. Additionally, longitudinal studies will help understand how employees’ perceptions of CSR and their effects on work attitudes and behavior change over time.

Practical implications

CSR can be an important tool for developing social capital within an organization by increasing employees’ engagement at work. Higher WE can help employees exert more efforts toward their company’s innovation and stay longer with their company, which can contribute to the company’s performance and competitiveness.

Originality/value

This study develops and empirically tests a theoretical model based on various disciplines. It extends existing CSR studies by examining the effects of CSR on WE and the mediation effects of WE, which have been rarely explored. This further explains how CSR influences employees’ attitudes and behavior that benefit a company’s competitive advantage to shed light on the resource-based view about employees being an important resource.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Mieke Audenaert, Alex Vanderstraeten and Dirk Buyens

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the field’s understanding of how to raise individual innovation. Specifically, the authors aim to contribute to an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the field’s understanding of how to raise individual innovation. Specifically, the authors aim to contribute to an understanding of the interplay of job characteristics and intrinsic motivation for individual innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses time-lagged survey data of a public service organization in Belgium. The analyses are based on more than 80 jobs and more than 1,000 employees. Hierarchical linear modeling was adopted to test cross-level hypotheses.

Findings

Innovation requirements influence individual innovation efforts by psychologically empowering employees, but the extent to which psychological empowerment translates into individual innovation depends on job complexity.

Originality/value

A more nuanced understanding is developed of when innovation requirements empower individual innovation, by acknowledging the role of job complexity in this relationship. The current findings contribute to a multilevel integrative understanding of the interplay of the job context and intrinsic motivation.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2016

Agnieszka Wojtczuk-Turek and Dariusz Turek

The purpose of this study is to describe and explain the relationship between perceived social-organizational climate (PSOC), organizational citizenship behaviors (OCB) of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to describe and explain the relationship between perceived social-organizational climate (PSOC), organizational citizenship behaviors (OCB) of other employees and innovative workplace behaviors (IWB) initiated and performed by employees. The mediating role of person-organization fit (P-O Fit) is tested within the relationship of PSOC, OCB and IWB.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted anonymously on a group of 246 employees from 76 companies operating in Poland. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used in the process of statistical analysis.

Findings

The research confirmed a significant statistical relationship between IWB and all studied variables: PSOC, OCB and P-O Fit. On the basis of the analysis, using SEM, it may be concluded that PSOC and OCB of other employees have an indirect influence on IWB, via P-O Fit.

Research limitations/implications

A cross-sectional design and use of self-reported questionnaire data are limitations of this study.

Originality/value

The combination of variables presented in the research model may explain the significance of the chosen determinants of behaviors which are the key ones from the perspective of the company’s effectiveness and competitiveness on the market. The results of this research extend the knowledge in the area of relationships of innovation in the workplace with aspects of social functioning in the organization.

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Hyoung Koo Moon and Byoung Kwon Choi

Researchers in the field of business ethics have posited that an organization's ethical climate can benefit for employees as well as organizations. However, most of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Researchers in the field of business ethics have posited that an organization's ethical climate can benefit for employees as well as organizations. However, most of the prior research has been conducted at the level of the individual, not organization. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to examine how an organization's ethical climate has a positive influence on two its performance indicators – customer satisfaction and financial performance – with a perspective of organizational innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from 29 subsidiaries of a conglomerate in South Korea. Hypotheses were tested using the partial least squares (PLS).

Findings

The result showed that an organization's ethical climate was positively related to customer satisfaction as well as financial performance, and this relationship was mediated by perceived organizational innovation. Additionally, the positive influence of an ethical climate on employees’ perceived organizational innovation was mediated by their organizational commitment and the climate for innovation.

Originality/value

With a focus on innovation, the study explained how an organization's ethical climate influences customer satisfaction and financial performance. Furthermore, as was the case in studies conducted in other developed countries, the results derived from South Korea sample demonstrated that an ethical climate is critical for organizational performances in developing countries.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 14 July 2020

Dung Tien Luu

The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between employee perceived internal corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices and pharmaceutical firms'…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between employee perceived internal corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices and pharmaceutical firms' performance with the mediating role of employee intrapreneurial behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The study sample consisted of 607 employees at pharmaceutical firms in Ho Chi Minh City of Vietnam. The data was analysed by a structural equation modelling (SEM).

Findings

The results revealed that the model fitted well into the empirical data considering the goodness-of-fit measures. The estimates results revealed the significant total effects of employee perception of internal CSR practices on pharmaceutical firms' performances through the influencing mechanism of employee intrapreneurial behaviour.

Practical implications

Employee welfare is a fundamental factor for organisational performance. Ethical organisations might yield prosperity through innovation employee behaviour. Firms should build the structure and mechanism to implement internal CSR and support the commitment of intrapreneurship.

Originality/value

The study investigates how employees respond to internal CSR practices and contribute to firm performance through employee intrapreneurial behaviour.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Upasna A. Agarwal

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of contextual variables – organisational justice (procedural justice, interactional justice and psychological contract…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of contextual variables – organisational justice (procedural justice, interactional justice and psychological contract) and trust – on work engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports a quantitative study of 323 managers working in manufacturing and pharmaceutical organisations based in western India. Drawing from social exchange theory, this paper tests the mediating role of trust in the justice-engagement relationship. The paper also investigates the effect of work engagement on employees' innovative work behaviour.

Findings

Results suggest that procedural justice, interactional justice and psychological contract fulfilment are positively related to work engagement with trust as the mediating element. Engagement significantly influences employees' innovative work behaviour

Research limitations/implications

The data were collected cross-sectionally, which means that causal inferences must be made with caution. Moreover, the data were collected from a single source. Nevertheless, the findings have implications for contemporary leadership and organisational psychology research and practice in a novel geographic context.

Originality/value

This study is one of the rare attempts to examine the influence of three justice variables and trust on work engagement. The study also contributes in terms of its context. With an increasing number of multinationals starting operations in India, an understanding of employee motivation has become an important concern. This research examines engagement levels of Indian managerial employees.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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