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Article

Daniel F.C. Crowley, Bruce J. Heiman, R. Charles Miller, Philip J. Morgan, Mark D. Perlow, David K.Y. Tang and Karishma Shah Page

The purpose of this paper is to summarize the Group of Thirty's recommendations and explain how they relate to other concurrent financial market regulatory initiatives in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to summarize the Group of Thirty's recommendations and explain how they relate to other concurrent financial market regulatory initiatives in the USA, UK, and Europe.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper summarizes the report's four core recommendations, describes how they relate to recent reports by the US Treasury Department, the US Chamber of Commerce, and Committee on Capital Markets Regulation, and discusses how they may signal the direction of forthcoming domestic and coordinated international regulation.

Findings

Momentum has been building for consolidation, increased oversight, and international coordination of the legal and regulatory framework that governs the financial industry. The report has an unabashedly pro‐regulatory agenda.

Originality/value

The paper provides helpful reference on the current direction of international financial institution regulation

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

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Article

Bruce A. Heiman, Weining Li, George Chan and Salvador D. Aceves

We explore the effects of three categories of fit on US‐China joint‐venture performance using four performance measures. Many studies prescribe strong fit across multiple…

Abstract

We explore the effects of three categories of fit on US‐China joint‐venture performance using four performance measures. Many studies prescribe strong fit across multiple categories as necessary for high performance, but little rigorous analysis supports this. Three important threads of existing “fit” research resonate in the literature: strategic, cultural and organizational fit. We analyze an original survey dataset of over 80 US‐China JVs, and test for effects of fit‐categories using two measures for each thread. Additionally, multiple control factors give a compelling look at a complete model of fit’s effects on JV performance. Objective congruence (strategic fit) among JV partner‐firms, impacts two performance‐measures. Efficacy of managerial communications (cultural fit) also matters, as does harmony regarding hiring decisions (organizational fit). Our findings are a step forward empirically, and partly resolve persistent questions about partner‐fit in JVs and performance.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

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Article

Pia Hurmelinna‐Laukkanen and Bruce Heiman

The current innovation environment is characterized by complexity, networking and internationalization and calls for managerial approaches that not only foster…

Abstract

Purpose

The current innovation environment is characterized by complexity, networking and internationalization and calls for managerial approaches that not only foster value‐capture activities, but acknowledge value creation as equally important. The purpose of this study is to clarify and define in more useful conceptual detail the nature of value creation, an area within the Knowledge Management field that has not received as much research scrutiny as it warrants. The authors' main contribution in unpacking a logic of problem finding is to expand understanding of how organizations choose valuable problems on which to work.

Design/methodology/approach

The research findings are based on a literature review. In particular, the paper aims to increase understanding of value creation in innovation by critically examining and augmenting the problem‐finding/problem‐solving (PF/PS) perspective.

Findings

Based on the PF/PS approach, the paper proposes a managerial cognitive frame that shows the challenges faced by managers in the value creation process and also the associated decision points. The paper argues that three distinct discriminating alignment choices – process selection, problem‐selection, and governance choice – are essential parts of value creation, and can in time lead to efficient value‐capture and improved innovation outcomes. Also, concentrating on the early stages of innovation, the paper identifies relevant processes and the various management biases that impede successful problem‐finding.

Research limitations/implications

As the paper is conceptual, the findings await empirical confirmation. However, the paper presents a framework that will provide a useful basis for further work.

Practical implications

The discussion of problem‐finding and the different processes that can be used to overcome various biases can be utilized by managers to improve processes within their organizations. Using the proposed framework as a tool, organizations can reduce resources wasted trying to solve inappropriately defined problems.

Originality/value

The contribution of the paper lies in presenting a new approach to value creation and capture, with a focus on the neglected area of problem‐finding. A new legalistic bias is specified in some detail, and the importance of awareness of bias by teams to diminish its impact on problem‐finding efficiency is discussed. Closer examination of value creation increases the potential for improved competitive advantage and value‐capture. Limitations of this and prior work are also discussed and directions for future work suggested.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article

Foo Nin Ho and Mark Patrick Gallagher

The purpose of this project was to explore and identify factors that influence a consumer to purchase wine during an afternoon of product sampling (wine tasting). A panel…

Abstract

The purpose of this project was to explore and identify factors that influence a consumer to purchase wine during an afternoon of product sampling (wine tasting). A panel of consumers was recruited for an afternoon of wine tasting at vineyards in Napa, California. Several potential hedonistic, utilitarian and logistical factors (i.e. winery facilities, quality of the wine and order in which the winery was visited) were measured using a journal log that was maintained by participants following the tasting experience for a period of one‐month. The conclusions drawn from this study were that group size, confidence in one's ability to purchase wine and overall assessment of a vineyard's wine portfolio were more important than the hedonistic factors in terms of inducing a sale immediately following a taste.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

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Article

Tomas Riha

Nobody concerned with political economy can neglect the history of economic doctrines. Structural changes in the economy and society influence economic thinking and…

Abstract

Nobody concerned with political economy can neglect the history of economic doctrines. Structural changes in the economy and society influence economic thinking and, conversely, innovative thought structures and attitudes have almost always forced economic institutions and modes of behaviour to adjust. We learn from the history of economic doctrines how a particular theory emerged and whether, and in which environment, it could take root. We can see how a school evolves out of a common methodological perception and similar techniques of analysis, and how it has to establish itself. The interaction between unresolved problems on the one hand, and the search for better solutions or explanations on the other, leads to a change in paradigma and to the formation of new lines of reasoning. As long as the real world is subject to progress and change scientific search for explanation must out of necessity continue.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 12 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article

Hannah Forsyth

The purpose of this paper is to consider the national and international political-economic environment in which Australian university research grew. It considers the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the national and international political-economic environment in which Australian university research grew. It considers the implications of the growing significance of knowledge to the government and capital, looking past institutional developments to also historicise the systems that fed and were fed by the universities.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on the extensive archival research in the National Archives of Australia and the Australian War Memorial on the formation and funding of a wide range of research programmes in the immediate post-war period after the Second World War. These include the Australian Atomic Energy Commission, the NHMRC, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, the Australian Pacific Territories Research Council, the Commonwealth Office of Education, the Universities Commission and the Murray review. This research was conducted under the Margaret George Award for emerging scholars for a project entitled “Knowledge, Nation and Democracy in Post-War Australia”.

Findings

After the Second World War, the Australian Government invested heavily in research: funding that continued to expand in subsequent decades. In the USA, similar government expenditure affected the trajectory of capitalist democracy for the remainder of the twentieth century, leading to a “military-industrial complex”. The outcome in Australia looked quite different, though still connected to the structure and character of Australian political economics.

Originality/value

The discussion of the spectacular growth of universities after the Second World War ordinarily rests on the growth in enrolments. This paper draws on a very large literature review as well as primary research to offer new insights into the connections between research and post-war political and economic development, which also explain university growth.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

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Article

Laura Lucia-Palacios, Raúl Pérez-López and Yolanda Polo-Redondo

This paper aims to demonstrate that stress is a relevant feeling to take into account in mall experience and customer satisfaction management. Furthermore, it is proposed…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate that stress is a relevant feeling to take into account in mall experience and customer satisfaction management. Furthermore, it is proposed that its effects on mall experience and satisfaction differ depending on shopping motivation and frequency.

Design/methodology/approach

The method is based on seemingly unrelated regressions models and data were obtained through a survey of 1,088 mall clients. Mall experience is addressed through customer cognitive and affective responses. Both terms together with stress and customer satisfaction with the mall are constructs measured by seven-point Likert scales. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to validate these measures.

Findings

The results show that stress reduces customers’ affective response and satisfaction. The effect of low levels of stress on customer affective response is less negative for frequent shoppers, and the influence of high levels on satisfaction is less negative for them. Furthermore, stress has a U-shaped effect on customers’ cognitive response, an effect that is reduced for frequent shoppers.

Practical implications

Mall managers should try to reduce stress in the management of their customers’ experience. Moreover, they should increase the shopping frequency of their clients by implementing marketing strategies, such as frequency programs and serial concerts, and assist shoppers in reorganizing their shopping goals by implementing organizing tools and new recommendations and suggestions.

Originality/value

Given that previous work on shopping stress is scarce, this paper expands the extant literature by analyzing its effects on mall experience and customer satisfaction. Furthermore, it shows that these effects may vary depending on shopping frequency and motivation.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article

Sherazed Hamza-Reguig, Nabila Boukhari Benahmed Daidj, Sabrine Louala, Ahmed Boualga and Myriem Lamri-Senhadji

The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of replacing two different fats on dyslipidemia, glycemic balance and adipose tissue redox status in obese rats.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of replacing two different fats on dyslipidemia, glycemic balance and adipose tissue redox status in obese rats.

Design/methodology/approach

Obesity was induced by feeding a high-mutton-fat diet during three months. An experimental group (n = 24) was divided into two groups that were fed during one month, 20 per cent of margarine or sardine oil. At Day 30, six rats from each group were sacrificed and the remaining rats were then subjected to a change in diet for one month: margarine was replaced by sardine oil and inversely, and then the rats were sacrificed. Three other groups (n = 6), each fed during two months, 20 per cent of margarine, sardine oil or mutton fat, served as controls.

Findings

Substitution of sardine oil by margarine compared to control sardine oil had increased triacylglycerols (TGs), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and isoprostanes (IsoPs) values, but decreased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and superoxide dismutase activity. Replacing margarine by sardine oil compared to control margarine reduced total cholesterol, TG, HbA1c, TBARS and IsoP contents but enhanced glutathione reductase and peroxidase activities. Nevertheless, comparing with the mutton fat, the two substitutions had improved glycemic and lipidic abnormalities and attenuated lipoperoxidation by enhancing enzymatic antioxidant defense. These favorable effects were better when margarine was replaced by sardine oil.

Originality/value

Substituting margarine with sardine oil seems to attenuate beneficial cardiometabolic risk markers associated to obesity and potentiate efficiency adipose tissue against the oxidative stress induced by the obesogenic diet.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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