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Databases for the Study of Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-325-0

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Shaker A. Zahra and Bruce A. Kirchhoff

New ventures contribute to the competitiveness of the United States in global markets, creating jobs and wealth. Understandably, public policy makers and researchers alike…

Abstract

New ventures contribute to the competitiveness of the United States in global markets, creating jobs and wealth. Understandably, public policy makers and researchers alike have shown an interest in understanding the factors that spur these ventures’ growth, which is also an important research issue in the field of entrepreneurship. Researchers have highlighted the role of owners’ needs and aspirations and industry conditions as determinants of new ventures’ growth. This study proposes that new ventures’ resource endowments influence their growth in domestic and international markets. Using the resource-based view (RBV) of the firm, the study examines the effect of select technological resources on the domestic and international sales growth of 419 new ventures. Start-ups (5 years or younger) benefit from using a different set of technological resources in achieving growth than those of adolescent firms (6–8 years old). These differences persist in low vs. high technology industries, reflecting the maturation of these ventures.

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Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-191-0

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Article

Rene Cordero, Steven T. Walsh and Bruce A. Kirchhoff

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which firms staffing with competent workers (CW), in addition to adopting organization technologies (OT) (which…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which firms staffing with competent workers (CW), in addition to adopting organization technologies (OT) (which include total quality management and just‐in‐time techniques) and advanced manufacturing technologies (AMT) change manufacturing performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature is reviewed to hypothesize relationships. The data are obtained with a questionnaire from 89 manufacturing managers in the micro electro‐mechanical systems industry. Factor analysis of indicators of manufacturing performance reveals two broad dimensions: manufacturing effectiveness and manufacturing flexibility. To test the hypotheses, these dimensions of manufacturing performance are regressed on measures of OT, AMT, CW and their pair‐wise interactions in a hierarchical fashion. The analyses are then repeated for the indicators of the two dimensions of manufacturing performance.

Findings

Staffing with CW fully increases both manufacturing effectiveness and manufacturing flexibility. The adoption of AMT partially increases manufacturing effectiveness, and partially increases manufacturing flexibility in the presence of CW. The adoption of OT fully increases manufacturing effectiveness, but partially decreases manufacturing flexibility in the presence of CW.

Originality/value

The paper provides a valuable study of the extent to which firms adopting OT and AMT, and staffing with CW change two broad dimensions of manufacturing performance and their indicators through both additive and synergistic effects.

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Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Abstract

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Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-191-0

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Book part

Abstract

Details

Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-191-0

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Book part

Martine R. Haas and Wendy Ham

Strategy scholars have long argued that breakthrough innovation is generated by recombining knowledge from distant domains. Even if firms have the ability to access and…

Abstract

Strategy scholars have long argued that breakthrough innovation is generated by recombining knowledge from distant domains. Even if firms have the ability to access and absorb knowledge from distant domains, however, they may fail to pay attention to such knowledge because it is seemingly irrelevant to their tasks. We draw attention to this problem of knowledge relevance and develop a theoretical model to illuminate how ideas from seemingly irrelevant (i.e., peripheral) domains can generate breakthrough innovation through the cognitive process of analogical reasoning, as well as the conditions under which this is more likely to occur. We situate our theoretical model in the context of teams in order to develop insight into the microfoundations of knowledge recombination within firms. Our model reveals paradoxical requirements for teams that help to explain why breakthrough innovation is so difficult.

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Article

Jianwen Liao, Harold P. Welsch and David Pistrui

Entrepreneurship and the development of new business continue to be the forefront of socioeconomic development in virtually all economies today. Despite evidence of…

Abstract

Entrepreneurship and the development of new business continue to be the forefront of socioeconomic development in virtually all economies today. Despite evidence of increasing research into entrepreneurial growth, the existing research is limited by the fact that most studies define entrepreneurial growth as a unidimensional construct and operationalize it as “realized” growth relying on financially based measures. Consequently, this article has two objectives: (1) to develop a set of accurate and comprehensive entrepreneurial growth measures; and (2) to test a series of hypotheses regarding precursors of growth intentions‐more specifically, to what extent, infrastructure factors affect entrepreneurial growth intentions. These two questions were examined using Entrepreneurial Profile Questionnaire (EPQ) in the context of Romania.

Results from factor analysis revealed refined patterns of entrepreneurial growth, including resource aggregation, market expansion, and technological improvement. The relationships between infrastructure and entrepreneurial growth were tested using a multiple regression model. Overall, it was posited that infrastructure is positively related to entrepreneurial growth. However, in most of the cases, the opposite proved to be true. These findings suggest that the Romanian entrepreneurs would pursue expansion plans in spite of the obstacles thrown into their path. Perhaps they have already developed strategies about overcoming those obstacles and in that process have developed the strength, ingenuity, and confidence to grow their new business ventures. Perhaps the many years that Romanians were confronted with numerous political and economical obstacles have prepared them to be much more flexible and adaptive.These counter-intuitive findings reflect on the hardiness and perseverance of the Romanian entrepreneurs.

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New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Book part

Asafa Jalata and Harry F. Dahms

To examine whether indigenous critiques of globalization and critical theories of modernity are compatible, and how they can complement each other so as to engender more…

Abstract

Purpose

To examine whether indigenous critiques of globalization and critical theories of modernity are compatible, and how they can complement each other so as to engender more realistic theories of modern society as inherently constructive and destructive, along with practical strategies to strengthen modernity as a culturally transformative project, as opposed to the formal modernization processes that rely on and reinforce modern societies as structures of social inequality.

Methodology/approach

Comparison and assessment of the foundations, orientations, and implications of indigenous critiques of globalization and the Frankfurt School’s critical theory of modern society, for furthering our understanding of challenges facing human civilization in the twenty-first century, and for opportunities to promote social justice.

Findings

Modern societies maintain order by compelling individuals to subscribe to propositions about their own and their society’s purportedly “superior” nature, especially when compared to indigenous cultures, to override observations about the de facto logic of modern societies that are in conflict with their purported logic.

Research implications

Social theorists need to make consistent efforts to critically reflect on how their own society, in terms of socio-historical circumstances as well as various types of implied biases, translates into research agendas and propositions that are highly problematic when applied to those who belong to or come from different socio-historical contexts.

Originality/value

An effort to engender a process of reciprocal engagement between one of the early traditions of critiquing modern societies and a more recent development originating in populations and parts of the world that historically have been the subject of both constructive and destructive modernization processes.

Details

Globalization, Critique and Social Theory: Diagnoses and Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-247-4

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Article

R.D. Wood

A Fortane shape function routine is presented for the constant moment triangular plate bending element. The routine also contains the shape functions for the constant…

Abstract

A Fortane shape function routine is presented for the constant moment triangular plate bending element. The routine also contains the shape functions for the constant inplane stress triangular element enabling it to be used for facet shell analysis. Details are included on calculation of the element stiffness matrix and equivalent nodal forces.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Article

Siets Andringa, Jill Poulston and Tomas Pernecky

The purpose of this study is to investigate the motivational factors behind the transition of successful hospitality entrepreneurs in New Zealand, back into paid employment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the motivational factors behind the transition of successful hospitality entrepreneurs in New Zealand, back into paid employment.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 16 interviewees were recruited using the snowball technique and their stories examined using a narrative analysis technique.

Findings

Motivational factors were categorised into seven themes of family, work–life balance, health and stress, age, planned exit, stagnation and intuition. Poor work–life balance was identified as a consistent factor in decisions to sell hospitality businesses. Although lifestyles were self-imposed, they were exacerbated by the conflicting needs of family, customers and the owners themselves, several of whom worked to exhaustion.

Research limitations/implications

Implications for prospective entrepreneurs include considerations of work–life balance and the true costs of hospitality business ownership.

Originality/value

This is the first study of motivations for leaving a successful hospitality business and moving into paid employment. As research is sparse on reasons for this transition, this study provides an understanding of this phenomenon and insights into the extraordinary challenges of hospitality entrepreneurship in New Zealand.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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