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Article

Bronwyn Eager, Sharon L. Grant and Alex Maritz

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether descriptions of functional coping strategies among entrepreneurs vary along temporal dimensions, from reactive or present…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether descriptions of functional coping strategies among entrepreneurs vary along temporal dimensions, from reactive or present oriented, to anticipatory or future oriented. Future-oriented coping is largely unexplored in stress and coping studies in the entrepreneurship literature, despite evidence that a future time perspective is advantageous for entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts an exploratory, qualitative approach: interviews were conducted with 22 entrepreneurs and coping strategies were classified, via thematic analysis, according to function, then time orientation.

Findings

Results confirmed that entrepreneurs’ coping strategies can be classified according to conventional functional taxonomies of coping that emphasize form (affective, behavioral, cognitive) and direction (change, adapt, disengage), but additionally suggested that time orientation may be an important dimension for classifying coping strategies in the entrepreneurship context.

Practical implications

The findings inform the assessment of coping strategies in future research on stress, coping and strain among entrepreneurs. In particular, researchers should assess temporal dimensions of coping alongside the functional dimensions which have been emphasized in past research. Assessment of meaningful dimensions of coping is necessary to identify adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies in future research. Knowledge of adaptive coping strategies among entrepreneurs can inform coping skills interventions for stress resilience.

Originality/value

This study makes a unique contribution to the emergent body of literature on stress and coping among entrepreneurs by utilizing both functional and temporal coping taxonomies to identify relevant dimensions of coping for study in this context.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article

Bronwyn Houldsworth, John O’Brien, Jim Butler and John Edwards

Workplace restructuring implies people changing roles, leading to the deskilling of people who must learn their way back to competence. Reports the case of a person…

Abstract

Workplace restructuring implies people changing roles, leading to the deskilling of people who must learn their way back to competence. Reports the case of a person learning in a new role. The conceptual framework for the analysis is the Dreyfus model of skill development. Shows the model to be effective both for research and for individuals to understand their own development. The results enrich the understanding of workplace learning, in particular the manner in which people can be helped to learn a new role.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Book part

Sally McMillan and Margaret A. Price

In this chapter, the authors analyze current pre-service teachers’ reflections on the journals written by teachers from the nineteenth century and early twentieth century…

Abstract

In this chapter, the authors analyze current pre-service teachers’ reflections on the journals written by teachers from the nineteenth century and early twentieth century. They explore what the interchange reveals about pre-service teachers’ conceptions of teaching and the learning-to-teach process. The analysis focuses on the commonalities and differences between these groups of teachers. Findings are presented in a readers’ theater format in which recurring themes and meaning-making are expressed by voices from the past and by those who would be teachers.

Details

Learning from Research on Teaching: Perspective, Methodology, and Representation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-254-2

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Article

Daniel Teghe

The purpose of this paper is to provide an example of how applied phronesis can be used as a methodological approach in social research. The example consists of an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an example of how applied phronesis can be used as a methodological approach in social research. The example consists of an exploration of the discourse of productivism in elderly care policy in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The research interrogates arrangements of objective facts within recent representations of the aged which render particular policy discourses rational. An analysis of selected secondary data and texts is offered to demonstrate how applied phronesis may be used to discern when objective facts are presented in particular ways to sustain useful discourses, such as productivism.

Findings

The paper demonstrates that, rather than being rational discourse, productivism employs suitable arrangements of objective facts leading to particular rationalisations, including that the elderly should be viewed as a separate “category”, that they are a burden on society and that they contribute to increasing health care costs. Alternative interpretations and arrangements of the same objective facts indicate that what is rendered as rational within the discourse of productivism may also be seen as a construct of power rather than an unavoidable and logical outcome.

Research limitations/implications

Because it is intended mainly as a demonstration, this paper offers a limited application of applied phronesis.

Originality/value

The research is employed as a practical demonstration of the efficacy of applied phronesis in social research. At the same time, this is the first phronetic exploration of productivism in aged care policy.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

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Article

Venkat Ramaswamy

This paper aims to discuss how two innovative firms – the French telecommunications firm Orange and the California‐based global networking firm Cisco – have gained

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss how two innovative firms – the French telecommunications firm Orange and the California‐based global networking firm Cisco – have gained competitive advantage from using the co‐creative enterprise business concept to generate sustainable growth.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes in detail the approach at Orange, which is on co‐creating experience environments with customers and industry mavens, and at Cisco, where the focus is on co‐creating the management of risk and reward.

Findings

Companies that have learned how to manage the process of creating unique value with customers and other stakeholders have developed engagement programs and processes that enable interactions among all stakeholders everywhere in the system, with the goal of creating greater value by fostering more rewarding or more valuable experiences.

Research limitations/implications

Two case examples of innovative practices are presented.

Practical implications

Orange's R&D and marketing processes have attracted lead‐users and early adopters, who are extremely valuable since they are more likely to be content co‐creators and the core adopters of their services. Cisco is attempting to extend its co‐creative governance frameworks through collaborative interactions with its customers and partners.

Originality/value

The paper alerts leaders that business and society are moving towards an individual‐ and experience‐based view of co‐creative engagement among individuals and institutions – outside and inside enterprises.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

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