Search results

1 – 1 of 1
Article
Publication date: 15 August 2019

Bronwen K. Maxson, Michelle E. Neely, Lindsay M. Roberts, Sean M. Stone, M. Sara Lowe, Katharine V. Macy and Willie Miller

The purpose of this paper is to discuss different strategies for implementing peer teaching as well as different roles for peer teachers in both academic libraries and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss different strategies for implementing peer teaching as well as different roles for peer teachers in both academic libraries and writing-intensive courses. It explores connections to critical pedagogy, sociocultural theory, open educational practices and high-impact practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology for implementing the three scenarios discussed in the paper differs widely. All approaches include some form of student feedback through focus groups, exit surveys or end-of-class assessments.

Findings

In both library and writing program settings, students have experience with and a favorable opinion of peer-assisted learning strategies.

Practical implications

These case studies provide concrete examples of how to develop different types of peer teaching interventions. The cases also detail benefits as well as challenges to implementation.

Social implications

Providing opportunities for peers to lead through teaching others has the potential to boost an individual’s sense of confidence, leadership and improve their own learning, as well as give students’ experiences to build upon and apply to their everyday lives and future careers.

Originality/value

While peer teaching is widely implemented in many disciplines, such as science, technology, engineering and medicine, its adoption in academic libraries has sometimes been viewed as controversial. This case study adds to the body of literature demonstrating that peer teaching is possible and desirable.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

1 – 1 of 1