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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Bromley H. Kniveton

The aim of this paper is to investigate whether those involved with recruitment/selection (RS) react differently towards male and female trainee managers.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate whether those involved with recruitment/selection (RS) react differently towards male and female trainee managers.

Design/methodology/approach

Measures of the perceptions towards trainee managers were collected from 440 managers and professionals involved in recruitment/selection (RS).

Findings

It was found that males were seen to have more stereotype male management characteristics than females. Female (RS) perceived female management trainees as possessing more male management characteristics than did male (RS).

Practical implications

The stereotype of the management trainee held by male (RS), with its emphasis on “male characteristics” would suggest females do face an unequal struggle in their careers. It is argued that male management characteristics, whilst possibly appropriate for organisations with a hierarchical structure, may not be as appropriate for the participatory organisational structure, which is becoming more common. Suggestions are made to help develop management skills for both male and female trainees.

Originality/value

This article gives the perceptions of people who recruit male and female trainee managers and will be of interest to employers and employees alike.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Bromley H. Kniveton

Trainers need to consider changes in working practices, which, it is argued, influence managers' perceptions of their careers. A total of 540 managers were interviewed…

Abstract

Trainers need to consider changes in working practices, which, it is argued, influence managers' perceptions of their careers. A total of 540 managers were interviewed, and a questionnaire was used to measure the relative importance of individual career anchors. It was found that younger managers were more orientated towards their own skills and what they could contribute, whereas older managers were more inclined to be aware of the limitations of their role in the organisation. It was stressed that the difference between the perception of their careers of the younger and older managers is something which the trainer needs to consider. Also significant to the trainer was how similar male and female managers were in their perceptions of their career anchors.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Bromley H. Kniveton

To investigate the motivations of clients attending leisure centres/clubs. It is noted that training programmes for instructors tend to neglect this, particularly in…

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the motivations of clients attending leisure centres/clubs. It is noted that training programmes for instructors tend to neglect this, particularly in relation to the gender and age of clients.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study 460 recreational athletes including equal numbers of males and females in the two age groups, 17‐27 years and 37‐84, were interviewed and given a short questionnaire concerning their motives for taking part in activities in leisure centres/clubs.

Findings

It was found that both gender and age influenced motivations to participate and reasons for leaving.

Research limitations/implications

The need for instructors to be made aware of the very different motives driving recreational athletes to attend clubs was stressed, if client wastage is to be reduced.

Originality/value

This study shows that gender and age variables influence motivations for participation, with marked differences in motivations between males and females. This article pin‐points areas that instructors need to take into account when training and will be of interest to instructors in the leisure business.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 29 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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