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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Joy Duxbury and Brodie Paterson

Tackling the problem of aggression and violence in health care is high on the agenda for healthcare professionals. In an endeavour to protect both patients and staff alike…

Abstract

Tackling the problem of aggression and violence in health care is high on the agenda for healthcare professionals. In an endeavour to protect both patients and staff alike when managing aggressive behaviour, the use of physical restraint is under scrutiny, particularly as a result of the reported deaths of a number of patients whilst being restrained. The challenges of employing this type of intervention, implications for safe and effective practices and the need for the suitable training of staff are explored in this paper.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Brodie Paterson, Kevin McKenna and Vaughan Bowie

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a Delphi study of trainers in the prevention and safer management of violence in mental health settings that sought…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a Delphi study of trainers in the prevention and safer management of violence in mental health settings that sought to identify and clarify what represents best practice at a European level.

Design/methodology/approach

A Delphi method was used to garner the views of a sample of 54 trainers involved in the training of managing violence and aggression on a draft charter of best practice.

Findings

A high level of agreement was found with the suggested indicators of best practice but the levels of agreement varied in some key areas and respondents identified a series of omissions from the charter and a number of potential challenges to its implementation.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was restricted to Europe and further research is planned to seek the views of a wider sample.

Practical implications

The charter will provide a reference document for best practice in the interim.

Social implications

Its implementation will require trainers to consciously identify the ethical implications not just of the content of their training buts its overall approach.

Originality/value

The study is presently unique in its focus and context but further research in this area is underway designed to complement this study.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2007

Gail Miller, Brodie Paterson, Richard Benson and Paul Rogers

Traditional methods of addressing workplace violence have relied almost solely on reactive measures. Methods of de‐escalation, strategies to calm the already distressed…

Abstract

Traditional methods of addressing workplace violence have relied almost solely on reactive measures. Methods of de‐escalation, strategies to calm the already distressed person down by means of positive communication, or responding to an actual or potential act of violence by means of physical control have formed the focus of training initiatives provided for staff. This approach has suggested an acceptance of the premise that violence in certain services is an inevitable problem that must be managed. This paper proposes that many incidents can be prevented and outlines the emerging evidence to support a structured, holistic approach. Additionally, it provides an overview of the recent policy agenda, the evidence base and examples of some recent and ongoing development work that attempts to change practice.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Paul Rogers, Gail Miller, Brodie Paterson, Clive Bonnett, Peter Turner, Sue Brett, Karen Flynn and Jimmy Noak

Breakaway training is a mandatory training programme for mental health staff in both NHS and private services. However, the question that remains outstanding from the…

Abstract

Breakaway training is a mandatory training programme for mental health staff in both NHS and private services. However, the question that remains outstanding from the recent guidance on the management of short‐term violence published by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) (NICE, 2005a; 2005b) is whether breakaway training is effective?This paper provides a history of and evidence for breakaway training, and a study examining the content of breakaway training in one English high secure hospital is provided.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Nicky Stanley and Margaret Flynn

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Jacki Gordon and Cameron Stark

Scotland has developed a national suicide prevention strategy, Choose Life, as part of a wider programme of mental health promotion and mental illness prevention. This…

Abstract

Scotland has developed a national suicide prevention strategy, Choose Life, as part of a wider programme of mental health promotion and mental illness prevention. This paper reports findings from a survey of Choose Life co‐ordinators, who are based in each local authority area and supported by a central team. The survey sought their views on progress, and achieved an 85% response rate. Co‐ordinators identified challenges in promoting suicide prevention in a policy‐rich environment with many competing priorities, in persuading local agencies to provide mainstream rather than project funds, and in keeping up‐to‐date with national and international research findings. The responses by the national team to these identified challenges are outlined.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

J. Dalton Stevens

To understand how young men with disabilities react against overarching narratives of independence during the transition to adulthood in independent living and…

Abstract

Purpose

To understand how young men with disabilities react against overarching narratives of independence during the transition to adulthood in independent living and interdependent living arrangements with parents in order to address the gap between transition policy and real lived experience.

Methods/Approach

I use life history interviews and ethnographic “go-alongs” with nine men with mobility impairments to understand how they experience and make sense of independent living and interdependence during the transition to adulthood. Transcripts and field notes were analyzed using grounded theory methodology.

Findings

Data reveal diverging pathways participants took to interdependent living situation, rooting before transition, and returning during transition. These pathways are shaped by logics of residential decision-making: accessibility expectations and individual adaptability. Those who rooted before transition developed accessibility expectations that motivated them to remain living their parents’ homes while those who returned during transition relied on individual adaptability to overcome physical inaccessibility. Individual adaptability did not overcome inaccessibility – all returned to their parents’ homes. Pathways shape how each group of participants experienced and made sense of interdependent living arrangements and independent living. Those who rooted before transition found interdependence to be a route to increased independence, and did not consider independent living a marker of adulthood. Those who returned during transition found that the interdependence they experienced increased feelings of dependence.

Implications/Value

Experiences and meanings emerging adults with disabilities have during the transition to adulthood reveal the complexity of interdependence and independent living. The pathways and the social forces shaping those pathways to interdependent living arrangements have implications for life course theory and disability policy.

Details

New Narratives of Disability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-144-5

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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Afshin Mehrpouya and Imran Chowdhury

In this chapter, we reexamine the notion that socially responsible behavior by firms will lead to increased financial performance. By identifying the underlying processes…

Abstract

In this chapter, we reexamine the notion that socially responsible behavior by firms will lead to increased financial performance. By identifying the underlying processes, institutional settings, and actors involved, we present a framework that is more attentive to the multiplicity and conditionality of the mechanisms operating in the often tenuous connection between firms’ social behavior and financial performance. Building and expanding upon existing analyses of the CSP–CFP linkage, our model helps to explain the mixed results from a wide range of empirical studies which examine this link. It also provides a novel theoretical account to help guide future researches that are more attentive to conditionalities and contextual contingencies.

Details

Sustainability, Stakeholder Governance, and Corporate Social Responsibility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-316-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1901

The Corporation of the City of London are about to appoint a Public Analyst, and by advertisement have invited applications for the post. It is obviously desirable that…

Abstract

The Corporation of the City of London are about to appoint a Public Analyst, and by advertisement have invited applications for the post. It is obviously desirable that the person appointed to this office should not only possess the usual professional qualifications, but that he should be a scientific man of high standing and of good repute, whose name would afford a guarantee of thoroughness and reliability in regard to the work entrusted to him, and whose opinion would carry weight and command respect. Far from being of a nature to attract a man of this stamp, the terms and conditions attaching to the office as set forth in the advertisement above referred to are such that no self‐respecting member of the analytical profession, and most certainly no leading member of it, could possibly accept them. It is simply pitiable that the Corporation of the City of London should offer terms, and make conditions in connection with them, which no scientific analyst could agree to without disgracing himself and degrading his profession. The offer of such terms, in fact, amounts to a gross insult to the whole body of members of that profession, and is excusable only—if excusable at all—on the score of utter ignorance as to the character of the work required to be done, and as to the nature of the qualifications and attainments of the scientific experts who are called upon to do it. In the analytical profession, as in every other profession, there are men who, under the pressure of necessity, are compelled to accept almost any remuneration that they can get, and several of these poorer, and therefore weaker, brethren will, of course, become candidates for the City appointment.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Thomas A. Lee

Reports on the role of UK emigrants to the USA in the creation and early development of its public accountancy profession. Explains findings in the context of US public…

Abstract

Reports on the role of UK emigrants to the USA in the creation and early development of its public accountancy profession. Explains findings in the context of US public accountancy firms founded by UK immigrants and focuses on the recruitment of qualified and unqualified public accountants from the UK. The study is based on searches of relevant archives in the UK and USA. The evidence reveals UK immigrants played a substantial part in the formation and early development of both public accountancy firms and institutions in the USA. However, the recruitment of immigrants by US firms appears to have been a temporary phenomenon pending the supply of US‐born accountants with suitable training and experience. The firms examined include local and national firms. Subject to data retrieval limitations, a major conclusion of the study is that unqualified immigrants played significant roles in the early histories of firms and institutions of US public accountancy.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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