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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Niki Macionis

The last few years has seen an unprecedented interest in the marketing and development of wine and culinary tourism, both overseas and in Australia (Macionis, 1998)…

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1048

Abstract

The last few years has seen an unprecedented interest in the marketing and development of wine and culinary tourism, both overseas and in Australia (Macionis, 1998). Indeed, wine and food have become integral components of the tourism product and experience (Hall, et.al., forthcoming). For example, Tourism NSW's Food and Wine in Tourism Plan (Tourism NSW, 1996:2) states that it is the “beginning of [and] effort to bring food and wine into the tourism mainstream,” while regional areas such as NSW's Central West have launched the Cowra‐Orange‐Mudgee Experience (COME), which focuses on food and wine as the “hook to lure more visitors” (Downey, 1998:6). Despite the increasing recognition of the role of wine and food in attracting visitors and the often quoted synergy and complementary nature of the wine and tourism sectors (King, 1998; Connel and Gibson, forthcoming) there has been little specific focus on wine, food and tourism linkages. In addition, wine tourism is often viewed only from the perspective of cellar door visitation and tasting (King, 1998), with little consideration placed on conceptualising wine tourism away from the winery. For example, many tourists' first experience with local or regional wines is often far removed from the cellar door, occurring at their hotel or at a restaurant. As such there are considerable opportunities in more explicitly linking and marketing the wine and food products in a tourism context. This paper reports on an exploratory examination and analysis of the nature and extent of linkages and relationships between the wine, food and tourism sectors in the Canberra Region. Based on extensive interviews with Canberra restaurateurs, it examines the potential of wine and food tourism in a developing wine region, highlights practices and perceptions that restrict the development of productive linkages between the wine and food sectors, and explores opportunities for strategic marketing activities that will benefit both industries at both a micro (i.e. individual enterprise) and a macro (destinational product development and marketing) level.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

C. Michael Hall, Brock Cambourne, Niki Macionis and Gary Johnson

Wine tourism is an area of growing interest because of its potential to contribute to regional development and employment at times of rural restructuring, particularly…

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1727

Abstract

Wine tourism is an area of growing interest because of its potential to contribute to regional development and employment at times of rural restructuring, particularly through the development of inter and intra industry networks. This paper provides a review of wine tourism, briefly discusses networks and their value, then analyses the development of wine tourism networks in Australia and New Zealand. The research indicates that although wine tourism network development is being actively encouraged, substantial difficulties exist because of the perception by many in the wine industry that they are not part of tourism. The paper concludes that while the development of new organisational structures to encourage wine tourism development are useful, they must be complimented by research on linkages, education of potential network members in order to close information gaps; and the development of network structures which maximise the overlap and linkages mat exists between the wine and tourism industries.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Darina Hoffman, Mike Beverland and Michelle Rasmussen

The wine sectors in Australia and New Zealand have developed a number of regional events in order to promote wine and build regional identity. Despite the popularity and…

Abstract

The wine sectors in Australia and New Zealand have developed a number of regional events in order to promote wine and build regional identity. Despite the popularity and long history of these events little research has been carried out on their role in wine marketing strategy. The purpose of this paper is to examine the use and evolution of regional wine events from a strategic perspective. Findings are based upon seven case studies from Australia and New Zealand. The authors argue that over time events evolve through a series of stages from regional awareness through to brand enhancement and customer loyalty. Implications of these changes for winery management and event organisers are explored.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Atsuko Hashimoto and David J. Telfer

Inniskillin Winery is at the forefront of an expanding wine tourism region in the Niagara Peninsula. This paper focuses on Inniskillin's efforts to adopt consumer‐led…

Abstract

Inniskillin Winery is at the forefront of an expanding wine tourism region in the Niagara Peninsula. This paper focuses on Inniskillin's efforts to adopt consumer‐led strategies to market Icewine to increasing numbers of Japanese tourists. Produced after the grapes have frozen on the vine, Icewine is an exclusive premium product. In a society where the price of the gift has become a barometer of the sender's sincerity, Icewine is well suited for the traditional Japanese custom of gift giving. This paper examines how Inniskillin's customer‐led marketing strategy matches with the psychological background of the Japanese target segment enabling the winery to sell 80–90% of all Icewine produced to its Japanese tourists.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Donald Getz and Graham Brown

This paper seeks to develop a framework for comparisons and benchmarking between wine tourism destinations.

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3216

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to develop a framework for comparisons and benchmarking between wine tourism destinations.

Design/methodology/approach

A regional case study was undertaken, including data from a survey of 23 wineries in Canada's Okanagan Valley, British Columbia. The survey provides the winery perspective on development of wine tourism, as well as opinions on what should be done to improve wine tourism.

Findings

Wineries were found to be pursuing tourism developments, but kept little data on visitors and related spending. Their goals and opinions on what is needed in the region revealed that they are mostly oriented toward domestic, independent travelers. One hypothesis emerging from this case study is that the growth and increasing sophistication of wine tourism infrastructure, both at wineries and elsewhere in the region, is in large part a function of market potential. On the supply‐side, a critical mass can be facilitated through establishment of major, landmark wineries that are purpose‐built as tourist attractions.

Practical implications

Using this profile of the Okanagan, implications are drawn for comparisons and benchmarking among wine tourism destinations, including a suggested process and measures.

Research limitations/implications

The single case study limits generalizability to other destinations, and the achieved sample of wineries does not necessarily reflect the major corporate wineries in the Okanagan Valley. More systematic comparison of wine regions is recommended.

Originality/value

This research makes an original contribution for applying the concept and method of benchmarking to wine tourism destinations. It is of value to the wine industry, destination marketers, and host community planners.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Jeffrey W. Stewart, Linda Bramble and Donald Ziraldo

The purpose of this paper is to present recommendations for future growth and continued success of wine and culinary tourism in the Niagara region.

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6210

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present recommendations for future growth and continued success of wine and culinary tourism in the Niagara region.

Design/methodology/approach

Through industry interviews with practitioners, researchers and stakeholders the recommendations of this paper were formed. Secondary research examined the issues and advances made in other area of the globe specific to wine and culinary tourism. The research is intended to cover the issues associated with advancing an industry sub‐sector that is still growing but will reach maturity in not‐so‐distant future.

Findings

In Niagara's wine and culinary tourism sector, there is a renewed call for industry specific research. Furthermore, linkages across the border are recommended to increase tourism revenue both in the USA and Canada. There is need to create more domestic awareness of the changes. Additionally, in order to attract one‐time visitors back to the region, it is important to enhance service through increased service training. There also exists a need for cooperation and coordination within the industry at all levels. The final recommendation is to advocate for signage and specific information to varied segments of the wine and culinary target market sub‐sets to deal with the differences in consumer motivations and preferences.

Originality/value

The relevant conclusions and recommendations listed will assist practitioners to continue the forward momentum of wine and culinary sectors in Niagara and around the world.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Meltem Caber, Gökhan Yilmaz, Dogus Kiliçarslan and Adnan Öztürk

The purpose of this study is to examine how food neophobia, food involvement, tour guide performance and intention of local food consumption impact each other.

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2733

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how food neophobia, food involvement, tour guide performance and intention of local food consumption impact each other.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was performed with a sample of international tourists visiting Antalya, Turkey, and the data were used to test the proposed research model by means of structural equation modelling.

Findings

Results reflected a causal relationship among the examined constructs. Although tour guide performance had an insignificant effect on food neophobia, tourists’ food involvement negatively impacted and decreased neophobia.

Originality/value

This study is an exceptional contribution to the literature, as it empirically investigates the role of tour guides on tourists’ local food consumption behaviour.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2020

Coralie Haller, Isabelle Hess-Misslin and Jean-Paul Mereaux

Several studies in management science have called for a better understanding of the experience economy approach to develop wine tourism. Few studies, however, have…

Abstract

Purpose

Several studies in management science have called for a better understanding of the experience economy approach to develop wine tourism. Few studies, however, have analysed experiential dimensions in the context of French wine-growing regions. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the difference between what wine tourism providers consider relevant in their market offer and what customers expect from their wine tourism experience. A new categorisation of wine tourists’ expectations based on Pine and Gilmore’s (1998) four realms model and Quadri-Felliti and Fiore’s model (2012) are developed.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methodology, qualitatively analysing 17 semi-structural interviews with the main wine tourism stakeholders in the Alsace region in north-east France and quantitatively analysing 233 questionnaires on wine tourists’ expectations and behaviours are adopted.

Findings

The study reveals a difference between experiential offers predicated on an educational approach and the explicit expectations of wine tourists (combining aesthetics, conviviality and authenticity, whose central focus is an encounter with the winemaker). Overall, the findings point to a need for greater inclusion of the experiential aspect in the offer designed for wine tourists.

Originality/value

The study identifies a gap between the educational dimension that professionals tend to promote in their offers and the real expectations of wine tourists who express more interest in the aesthetic dimension provided by an attractive visit environment and an enjoyable experience. At the heart of the authentic experience for wine tourists is meeting the winegrower, making authenticity a major factor.

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2008

Joanna Fountain, Nicola Fish and Steve Charters

There is growing research on the value of winery tasting rooms/cellar doors as an avenue for relationship building with consumers resulting in greater brand loyalty. This…

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3215

Abstract

Purpose

There is growing research on the value of winery tasting rooms/cellar doors as an avenue for relationship building with consumers resulting in greater brand loyalty. This paper aims to examine the role of tasting rooms in this regard in an Australasian context.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was exploratory, designed to explore a full range of visitors' experiences at the winery tasting room, using a modified form of mystery shopping combined with focus groups.

Findings

Establishing brand loyalty through a winery tasting room experience requires more than just good wine or good service quality, rather it results from an experience which is personalised and which establishes an emotional connection between the visitor and the winery, their product and winery staff. Generally smaller wineries were making this emotional connection more effectively than larger wineries. By contrast, staff at small and larger wineries alike were making little effort to establish concrete links to instil brand loyalty with the wine tourist post‐visit by encouraging repeat visitation or promoting their mailing lists or even eliciting wine sales.

Research limitations/implications

The research focused on a relatively small number of consumers in Australia and New Zealand and thus may not be immediately generalisable to other markets.

Practical implications

The research highlights numerous areas for improvement in the organisation of tasting room encounters and the training of staff, noticeably with regards to making lasting connections with visitors resulting in future brand loyalty; issues which could be addressed by winery managers.

Originality/value

The paper gives depth to results previously reported by researchers on the role of service provision at the tasting room to the overall winery experience, and adds perspectives on the effectiveness of efforts to establish brand loyalty and maintain post‐visit contact with the winery visitor.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2009

Martin H. Kunc

The number of wine tourists in Chile is still small even though investment in infrastructure, like cellars and wine routes, has been made in the last five years. A…

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2023

Abstract

Purpose

The number of wine tourists in Chile is still small even though investment in infrastructure, like cellars and wine routes, has been made in the last five years. A question is important to be answered at this point: is there a market for wine tourism in Chile, did the industry overestimate its potential? The lack of historical data impedes an evaluation of these questions. The purpose of this paper is to forecast the size of the local wine tourists market in Chile and provide with recommendations to its development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper consists of the application of a diffusion model to forecast development paths for Chilean wine tourism market. The model is populated with information obtained through surveys to those demographic segments identified as more closely involved with wine tourism based in Charters and Ali‐Knight.

Findings

Chilean wine industry has been developing its infrastructure in wine tourism for a number of years, but the number of wine tourists is still very low. Behavioral factors like local consumers' behavior, especially the high level of forgetting (an average wine visitor will perform only one visit to a winery) that reduces the effect of word‐of‐mouth, hinders the development of wine tourists. Wineries should aim to maintain a constant level of awareness among wine tourists in order to obtain repeated visits and encourage word‐of‐mouth as suggested in Dodd.

Research limitations/implications

Forecasting models depend on the variables employed. Consequently the results are affected by the certainty of the values of the variables, as well as their level of exactness. Even though surveys are employed to obtain the values of the variables for the model, there are no historical data to validate the results.

Originality/value

The paper presents a forecasting model to identify the development of wine tourism instead of only reporting actual or past results. Therefore, the paper adopts a forward‐looking perspective for analyzing wine tourism market size differently than previous approaches (see Mitchell and Hall for a review). The model also supports policy recommendations.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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