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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2019

Raphaël Pieroni and Patrick James Naef

The purpose of this paper is to analyse urban transformation as a tourism resource. Tourism is undeniably a powerful motor for urban transformation but in return, urban…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse urban transformation as a tourism resource. Tourism is undeniably a powerful motor for urban transformation but in return, urban transformation can represent a resource for actors related to tourism. More precisely this paper focuses on one major transformation of modern cities: gentrification.

Design/methodology/approach

The central hypothesis of this paper is that gentrification accompanies tourism, but that gentrification itself may also become an object of the tourist gaze. The paper focuses on local guides and small touristic entrepreneurs in order to identify the tensions that might arise. The presentation of two guided tours – “Subculture Brixton Nightlife Tour” and “Where Brooklyn At?” – will enable us to explore how the gentrification of Brixton (London) and Brooklyn (New York) may be used as a tourism resource for local private entrepreneurs.

Findings

Results presented here are based on ethnographic methods such as observation as well as content analysis and semi-directive interviews. Mobilising the historical concept of “slumming”, this paper proposes an extended conceptual framework, “neo-slumming”, to analyse evolving tourism practices in modern cities, practices that are considered here as tourism’s new frontiers.

Originality/value

However, as tourism transforms cities, the process itself is now of interest to tourists and thus becomes a resource for sector businesses (Naef, 2018). Yet studies about the touristification of urban transformation are still quite rare. This analysis aims to fill this gap by looking at the way a process, such as some spectacular, rapid or radical transformation of the urban fabric, can become a touristic resource associated with specific narratives and representations. In this context, the tourist gaze (Urry, 2002) is directed on a resource characterised by its ongoing change.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 March 2007

Tino Bech‐Larsen, Lars Esbjerg, Klaus G. Grunert, Hans Jørn Juhl and Karen Brunsø

The objective of this article is to conduct a case study of the Supermalt brand of malt beer, which has become the preferred beverage of Afro‐Caribbean consumers in Brixton

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Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this article is to conduct a case study of the Supermalt brand of malt beer, which has become the preferred beverage of Afro‐Caribbean consumers in Brixton on a very limited marketing budget.

Design/methodology/approach

The article uses the concepts of personal identity and brand identity in a qualitative study to explore how Brixton‐based Afro‐Caribbean consumers construct their self‐identities and the brand identity of Supermalt. Semi‐structured interviews were conducted with 14 Afro‐Caribbean consumers. Each interview was divided into three parts. The first part focused on consumers' self‐identities. The second part explored the role of food and beverage products in the construction of self‐identities. The final part focused on the construction of brand identity for Supermalt.

Findings

The article provides information on the self‐identities constructed by Afro‐Caribbean informants. The food and beverage consumption of informants reflects their mixed cultural identity. The brand identity Supermalt appears to be malleable, with ample room for consumer co‐construction. Perceptions of brand identity differ markedly among informants, who are all able to construct Supermalt as one of their own.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based solely on semi‐structured interviews with a small sample of Afro‐Caribbean consumers. The findings are therefore not generalizable.

Practical implications

The Supermalt brand represents an interesting case for companies aiming to develop strong brands with a limited marketing budget. Based on the Supermalt case, suggestions are made regarding branding in relation to ethnic minorities.

Originality/value

This article provides a study of a brand that has become strong within a narrowly defined group of consumers.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

John Podmore

Brixton Prison has had a long and chequered history, and became famous for all the wrong reasons: branded as a racist institution, criticised for its appalling record on…

Abstract

Brixton Prison has had a long and chequered history, and became famous for all the wrong reasons: branded as a racist institution, criticised for its appalling record on health care and eschewed by the private sector. This article sets out how the author, as newly appointed Governor, turned theories of leadership and management in the criminal justice system into practice. Three key components of the institution ‐ prisoners, staff and ‘business’ ‐ are described, and the problems in maintaining an effective balance discussed.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Article
Publication date: 4 May 2009

John Pitts

The X‐It gang desistance programme began in 2004 in the wake of a spate of fatal, gang‐related shootings in Brixton, South London. The programme is owned and run by the…

Abstract

The X‐It gang desistance programme began in 2004 in the wake of a spate of fatal, gang‐related shootings in Brixton, South London. The programme is owned and run by the X‐It peer youth workers, gang‐involved young people who wish to find alternatives to gang violence for other young people living in gang‐affected neighbourhoods. The programme won the Guardian Public Service Award in 2007, when peer youth workers from the programme gave evidence to the Home Affairs Select Committee on young black people and the criminal justice system.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

John Earl, former head of a section within the GLC Historic Buildings Division, talksabout his long and distinguished career in surveying. He traces hiscareer from its…

432

Abstract

John Earl, former head of a section within the GLC Historic Buildings Division, talks about his long and distinguished career in surveying. He traces his career from its roots at the Brixton School of Building up until his current position with the Theatre Trust, reflecting on such issues as conservation work, planning legislation, funding, the GLC, and the RICS.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1968

As the District Inspector for Islington, Roy Truman has specific responsibilities in a borough with the highest immigrant intake in the country (23.1 per cent in the 1967…

Abstract

As the District Inspector for Islington, Roy Truman has specific responsibilities in a borough with the highest immigrant intake in the country (23.1 per cent in the 1967 figures), but his interest ranges over a much wider spectrum of immigrant education situations — taking in many of the oft ignored differences. He is the first to point out that the heterogeneous groupings of Islington, with a weighting of Greek Cypriots, have very little in common with the concentration of West Indians in Brixton or the predominantly male, Asian community in Bradford. ‘It is not just the size of the group, it's the composition’ and each nationality brings with it a specific set of problems related to different levels of expectation. Pakistanis, for example, generally cannot speak English on arrival, have, and maintain a separate culture, and do not expect a great deal from the host community. West Indians however feel, quite rightly, that they have been brought up in the Western tradition — sharing everything from religion and language to nursery rhymes. For them the shock of nonacceptance is far greater. The West Indian children also have to face a complex transition to English — English, with intense interference from their own and the overall cultural implication of prestige. Teaching English to non‐English‐speaking children, ie Greeks and Asians, is a much more straightforward process.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 10 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1982

Stuart Eliot

The search for new approaches to inner city problems has been stepped up following the recent disturbances in Brixton, Toxteth and Moss Side, but clearly (here is no…

Abstract

The search for new approaches to inner city problems has been stepped up following the recent disturbances in Brixton, Toxteth and Moss Side, but clearly (here is no simple solution. Certainly, the answer does not depend solely on the amount of money ploughed into the areas because, as Mr Heseltine has argued, “very large sums of public money are already being spent, and they do not always appear to have solved the problems of our cities.” Instead, any improvement is likely to come from a variety of sources — political, social and financial. This article examines the contribution that retailers can make.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1968

At the upper end of the authorty's formal education structure, the higher education branch encompasses the middle tier technical colleges, the aided colleges, teacher…

Abstract

At the upper end of the authorty's formal education structure, the higher education branch encompasses the middle tier technical colleges, the aided colleges, teacher training, and the proposed polytechnics. Assistant education officer E. Walker has at his disposal 18 technical colleges and schools of art, nine commercial colleges, 11 aided colleges and nine colleges of education. Excluding the colleges of education, the other colleges have a combined student load of over 154 000. Among the maintained colleges are the London College of Printing (unique in England), the art schools of Chelsea, Camberwell, Central, Hammersmith and St Martin's, and the monotechnic colleges for building (Brixton), distribution, fashion, furniture and clothing.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1975

ELAINE KEMPSON

YOU ARE probably wondering what has happened to Industrial Library News. In taking over from Alan Armstrong I should like to broaden the coverage of these columns to cover…

Abstract

YOU ARE probably wondering what has happened to Industrial Library News. In taking over from Alan Armstrong I should like to broaden the coverage of these columns to cover current technical and commercial library news in general. So if you feel that the services you run, committee you serve on or publications you produce would be of interest to others I should be delighted to hear from you at Lambeth Reference Library, Brixton Oval, London SW2 Tel: 01–274 7451 ext 32.

Details

New Library World, vol. 76 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Audrey Allwood

My research, entitled ‘The negotiation of belonging among long‐term West Indian migrants residing in a sheltered housing scheme in Brixton, London’, examined the…

Abstract

My research, entitled ‘The negotiation of belonging among long‐term West Indian migrants residing in a sheltered housing scheme in Brixton, London’, examined the intricacies of identity and placement. The Supporting People Framework governs this BME supported housing scheme within the Council's equalities ethos. My research sample of 26 women and men aged between 60 and 86 were working‐class migrants who had moved to England in the 1950s and 1960s. Influenced by Gramsci's (1990) ideas about the involvement of ordinary people in social change, and Bhabha's (1994) idea of placement, I investigated how the elders, assisted by others who acted on their behalf, negotiated their place in British society as recipients of support services, and engaged in consultation and user involvement processes. Both conflicting and supportive service provision arose. This created shifting boundaries in relation to belonging that emerged between the elders, their place of birth, their formative culture and their on‐going engagement with new experiences, other groups and the state.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

1 – 10 of 358