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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Michelle R. Nelson, Brittany R.L. Duff and Regina Ahn

This paper aims to examine the perceptions of the visual packaging of snacks and nutrition knowledge among preschool children. Packages serve as persuasive media at the…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the perceptions of the visual packaging of snacks and nutrition knowledge among preschool children. Packages serve as persuasive media at the point of purchase.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper 13 interviews with four-year-olds were conducted. Children sorted seven snacks that implied fruit into categories based on perceptions of fun, taste, parent’s choice and “nutrition”. Children also drew trees with food that would make them healthy or not healthy.

Findings

Children attended to the package elements more than the product. All children selected the character fruit snack as their preferred choice; however, perceptions for fun and taste varied among snacks. Perceptions of healthiness showed evidence of heuristics (e.g. sugar = bad; fruit = good). Some children were able to understand that their parents’ choices may be different from their own.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the small sample size, it is not possible to generalize results to all children. Children seemed to understand that the character may not convey “healthy” or “taste”, but they still chose the snack with a character.

Practical implications

Children as young as four can understand nutrition heuristics and may/may not use those heuristics in product preferences.

Social implications

Children may be able to reason about their own preferences and others’ preferences at a preoperational stage of development.

Originality/value

Previous research indicates that older children are attracted by characters. The findings show that younger children also prefer characters but may be capable of disentangling the various associations of “characters”.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

George Anghelcev, Mun-Young Chung, Sela Sar and Brittany R.L. Duff

Successful marketing communication campaigns require a thorough assessment of the public's current perceptions and attitudes toward the topic of the campaign. Such…

Abstract

Purpose

Successful marketing communication campaigns require a thorough assessment of the public's current perceptions and attitudes toward the topic of the campaign. Such insights are most likely attained if a range of research methods are employed. However, in the area of pro-environmental campaigns, there has been an over-reliance on quantitative surveys. To illustrate the benefits of complementary, qualitative approaches, this paper reports a qualitative investigation of perceptions of climate change among young South Koreans.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a variant of the Zaltman Metaphor Elicitation Technique (ZMET), a hybrid protocol which combines photo elicitation with metaphor analysis of subsequent in-depth individual interviews. Unlike survey research, ZMET uncovers the emotional, interpretive and sensory mental structures which, along with factual knowledge, make up the public mindset about climate change.

Findings

The analysis revealed a multifaceted mental model of climate change, whereby factual, interpretive and emotional knowledge is organized around themes of loss, human greed, affective distress and iconic representations of tragic endings. The causal dynamics of climate change are construed along a continuum of psychological distance, with antecedents placed in proximity and effects assigned to distant temporal, geographical and psychological spaces.

Practical implications

Four message strategies for climate change mitigation campaigns are identified based on the findings.

Originality/value

The study makes a methodological argument for supplementing survey research with image-based qualitative investigations in the formative stages of pro-environmental campaigns. More specifically, the article demonstrates the applicability of ZMET to social marketing communication. Apart from the methodological implications, this appears to be the first in-depth qualitative investigation of public perceptions of climate change in East Asia, a populous and fast developing region which has become a major contributor to the world’s carbon emissions, and an important player in the global effort toward mitigation.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1948

ALL journals move with the times if they are vital. We have always held that The Library World has been in touch with the currents of thought and practice and, as this is…

Abstract

ALL journals move with the times if they are vital. We have always held that The Library World has been in touch with the currents of thought and practice and, as this is our jubilee number, we would stress these facts again. Fifty years ago, the pioneer public librarians of the closing nineteenth century found that they needed a means of expression and communication, and indeed of criticism, untrammelled by the necessary reticences of the official associations. That is not to say that they were not, as now, supporters of the Library Association; indeed, they were its most active members; but they realized that The Library Association Record is the property of the members. It is bound to refrain from undue praise or blame of any activity of any of those members. At least, that was the view then prevalent and we still think it is a fair one. Thence came THE LIBRARY WORLD with its open secret that the honorary Editor was James Duff Brown. It drew on a wide range of contributors, and was the voice of those who were fighting for open access, subject‐indexes, close‐classification, and the card catalogue, as well as the general liberation of libraries from indicators with all the restrictions those contraptions sustained. That echo of a dead controversy of long ago rings naturally in our jubilee hour. It was an influence from the start, and in its unbroken career almost every librarian of importance has written something for it; indeed, many young writers first saw themselves in print in it. That was and is a characteristic of our editorial effort—to furnish a forum for librarians of any age, in the belief that age needs the criticism and suggestions of youth as much as youth needs those of age. If, occasionally, an article has appeared which has betrayed the prentice hand, we have made no apology for it; there has always been something in it that repaid the publication. Generally, however, the methods which now prevail in public and other libraries, but perhaps especially in public libraries, were first expounded in our pages. Then we have writers who have written for nearly forty years in that remarkable correspondence, Letters on Our Affairs, which even today is probably the most‐read of all library writings. At least a dozen faithful correspondents have been involved in them.

Details

New Library World, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1909

IN making the suggestion, as some of my friendly critics have done, that the classes Fine and Useful Arts should be restored, as in Dewey, they rather miss the humour of…

Abstract

IN making the suggestion, as some of my friendly critics have done, that the classes Fine and Useful Arts should be restored, as in Dewey, they rather miss the humour of the situation. The Subject Classification is not an amended Dewey or Cutter, but a humble attempt at an entirely new system, designed to meet the needs of popular libraries. It is not even a classification of knowledge, but, as experience has proved, a very practical and simple rearrangement of the factors of knowledge as set forth and preserved in books. The scheme is not indebted to any other system for aught but suggestions of main classes; all the details of the tables having been worked out independently, without reference to any classification save the Adjustable. It will be manifest, on reflection, that it would be fatal for the compiler of a new system to allow himself to be fettered or influenced by the schedules of other authors. I am one of those who decline to believe in the value of standardization of ideas or practice, save to a small degree in certain mechanical matters, and it would therefore be foolish to follow in the same rut as certain predecessors, simply because a longer existence has to some extent established their findings as settled conventions.

Details

New Library World, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1909

THE CATEGORICAL TABLES of the S.C. which are used entirely for the sub‐division of subjects have only been criticized for two reasons, and neither is very serious. It has…

Abstract

THE CATEGORICAL TABLES of the S.C. which are used entirely for the sub‐division of subjects have only been criticized for two reasons, and neither is very serious. It has been said that in many cases they make the notation too cumbrous and the numbers too long; and someone has objected to these tables for including subjects which are already in the main schedules. A lengthy symbol is almost inseparable from minute classification, because it is impossible without enormously increasing the main tables to provide for the many forms and standpoints which require expressing if an attempt is to be made to get right up to the specific subject. An example of enormous expansion will be found in the uncompleted Library of Congress Classification, in which no fewer than 7,079 numbers are used for music, a subject which in the S.C. is even more fully detailed in 332 numbers. For instance, there is no place in the Congressional scheme for the viol family of instruments, in connection with which there is a very large literature, so that, in spite of its great array of numbers, it appears that it is possible to miss important headings even in the most ambitious scheme. This inflation is caused by the constant repetition of forms, localities, and other categories, which in the S.C. are expressed once and for all in separate tables, by numbers which always mean the same thing. Thus:—

Details

New Library World, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1932

ALL the auguries for the Bournemouth Conference appear to be good. Our local secretary, Mr. Charles Riddle, seems to have spared neither energy nor ability to render our…

Abstract

ALL the auguries for the Bournemouth Conference appear to be good. Our local secretary, Mr. Charles Riddle, seems to have spared neither energy nor ability to render our second visit to the town, whose libraries he initiated and has controlled for thirty‐seven years, useful and enjoyable. There will not be quite so many social events as usual, but that is appropriate in the national circumstances. There will be enough of all sorts of meetings to supply what the President of the A.L.A. describes as “the calling which collects and organizes books and other printed matter for the use and benefit of mankind and which brings together the reader and the printed word in a vital relationship.” We hope the discussions will be thorough, but without those long auto‐biographical speeches which are meant for home newspapers, that readers will make time for seeing the exhibitions, and that Bournemouth will be a source of health and pleasure to all our readers who can be there.

Details

New Library World, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1907

SO much controversy has raged around the subject of newsrooms in the past two years, that librarians are, as a rule, utterly tired of it, and the appearance of still…

Abstract

SO much controversy has raged around the subject of newsrooms in the past two years, that librarians are, as a rule, utterly tired of it, and the appearance of still another article upon the subject is not calculated to tone down the general spirit of vexation. It requires no little courage to appear in the arena in this year of Grace, openly championing those departments of our institutions which were originally intended to convey the news of the day in the broadest manner.

Details

New Library World, vol. 9 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1958

ELSEWHERE in this number we list libraries which have Esent us copies of their annual reports which we are glad to have. Now and again we are able to elaborate on these…

Abstract

ELSEWHERE in this number we list libraries which have Esent us copies of their annual reports which we are glad to have. Now and again we are able to elaborate on these, but in the present issue that has not been possible. We would say, however, that these reports are deserving of the attention of librarians generally, and of students at the library schools. They are records of work in progress, and they do suggest the development of library policy. The best of them are of textbook value.

Details

Library Review, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1976

The way of thought and vision and memory is that they often come upon you unexpectedly, presenting nothing new but usually with a clarity and emphasis that it all seems…

Abstract

The way of thought and vision and memory is that they often come upon you unexpectedly, presenting nothing new but usually with a clarity and emphasis that it all seems new. This will sometimes happen after a long period of indecision or when things are extremely difficult, as they have long been for the country, in most homes and among ordinary individuals. Watching one's life savings dwindle away, the nest‐egg laid down for security in an uncertain world, is a frightening process. This has happened to the nation, once the richest in the world, and ot its elderly people, most of them taught the habit of saving in early youth. We are also taught that what has been is past changing; the clock cannot be put back, and the largesse—much of it going to unprincipled spongers—distributed by a spendthrift Government as token relief is no answer, not even to present difficulties. The response can only come by a change of heart in those whose brutal selfishness have caused it all; and this may be a long time in coming. In the meantime, it is a useful exercise to consider our assets, to recognize those which must be protected at all costs and upon which, when sanity returns, the future depends.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 78 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1928

THE Blackpool Conference has been duly held; Lord Elgin has handed his office to his successor, Dr. Lindsay; and a presidential address, full of sound commonsense and…

Abstract

THE Blackpool Conference has been duly held; Lord Elgin has handed his office to his successor, Dr. Lindsay; and a presidential address, full of sound commonsense and useful thought, has been delivered which has been ignored in its essentials by the popular press and inflated in respect of a jest which preceded it. As for the general results of the discussions, they are difficult to assess. Certainly useful work was done. On the “local” side the meeting was completely successful. The nights were illuminated by the wonderful autumn light‐show in which Blackpool surpasses England; in the receptions, amusements and facilities afforded no conference assembly has been entertained more royally.

Details

New Library World, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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