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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Philip A. Ritson and Lee D. Parker

This paper aims to examine the employment of the military metaphor by the management thinker and writer Lyndall Urwick who in the twentieth century developed and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the employment of the military metaphor by the management thinker and writer Lyndall Urwick who in the twentieth century developed and articulated his ideas over a 60-year period, arguably the longest continuous period of any management writer of his day.

Design/methodology/approach

This study draws on published research into Urwick as well as upon the breadth of his published writings over a 60-year period. It offers a contextualised explanatory analysis of his military theory ideas and explores their lack of traction by reference to British military, economic and social history.

Findings

The study reveals the wartime context that surrounded the emergence of his ideas and motivated Urwick’s faith in the military approach to management. This stood in contrast to the countervailing forces of the post-war decline in British industry and a populist mythology of British Army mismanagement and failure in the Great War.

Originality/value

In this case of a management idea’s failure to gain traction, the importance of the congruence between management theory and societal beliefs emerges as crucial to the likely uptake of new management thinking.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Kelly Farley, Rick Walker, Harry Bondy and Dan Mendoza

Unlike many militaries in Europe, the Canadian Forces (CF) have no union or representative association. Although two separate studies have shown that more than one-third…

Abstract

Unlike many militaries in Europe, the Canadian Forces (CF) have no union or representative association. Although two separate studies have shown that more than one-third of military members think positively about forming a union (Bradley & Charbonneau, 2004; Deneumoustier, 1971), there has traditionally been little movement towards any form of associationism within Canada's military. While there is no formal ‘contract’ between the CF and the government of Canada, an informal social contract has appeared to be successful in maintaining the status quo. Critics of the social contract argue the agreement is one-sided; that is, the responsibilities of the member to Canada are well defined in the National Defence Act and Queen's Regulations and Orders but there is “no such articulation of the responsibilities of the Government of Canada to the men and women of the CF” (Milner, 1998, p. 10).

Details

Military Missions and their Implications Reconsidered: The Aftermath of September 11th
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-012-8

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Richard Bartle

Britain is now one of the few EC countries without some form of military representative body. Yet, probably the first military trade union was formed in the British Armed…

Abstract

Britain is now one of the few EC countries without some form of military representative body. Yet, probably the first military trade union was formed in the British Armed Forces in 1919. At the outset, the organisation grew rapidly with the formation of 49 branches and an estimated membership of 10,000 (Englander, 1989, p. 10). But the efforts of the Soldiers’, Sailors’ and Airmens’ Union (SSAU) to organise the armed forces and secure a right of representation were short-lived. The authorities were quick to react to the perceived socialist threat by demobilising and discharging “men who [were] largely imbued with unionism tinged with socialism” (Englander, 1989, p. 11) and, following a raid by the intelligence services on the SSAU headquarters, the union rapidly disappeared.

Details

Military Missions and their Implications Reconsidered: The Aftermath of September 11th
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-012-8

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Abstract

Details

Delivering Victory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-603-5

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2020

Gareth Thompson

This article presents a historical investigation into the foreign policy messages of the British Union of Fascists' (BUF) publicity and propaganda from its foundation in…

Abstract

Purpose

This article presents a historical investigation into the foreign policy messages of the British Union of Fascists' (BUF) publicity and propaganda from its foundation in 1932 until the outbreak of World War II in 1939, along with a discussion of the methods and institutional arrangements used to propagate its ideas of peace, empire and transnational co-operation.

Design/methodology/approach

The historical investigation is based upon scrutiny of original BUF documents relating to the period 1932–1939 from various archives. After cataloguing of the relevant publicity and propaganda materials in time sequence and thematically, analysis was organised using a historical institutionalism approach.

Findings

The article explains the different phases of the BUF's message development and how publications, meetings and media were used to project its ideas. It also discussed the impact of support from Viscount Rothermere's newspapers and financial support from Benito Mussolini. Consideration of publicity materials alongside files from BUF headquarters enabled identification and investigation into the communicative actors who did the publicity work, including Director of Publicity, John Beckett.

Social implications

The article reflects upon how the British Union of Fascists' publicity and propaganda relates to modern manifestations of the communication of authoritarian and nationalistic political propositions and the historical continuities that endure therein.

Originality/value

The project makes an original contribution to the history of British political propaganda and public relations through an inquiry based upon scrutiny of historical documents in UK archives relating to BUF publicity related to foreign policy.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Helen Brunger, Jonathan Serrato and Jane Ogden

Ex‐service personnel face numerous and significant problems upon discharge from the forces. The purpose of this paper is to explore experiences of the transition from…

Abstract

Purpose

Ex‐service personnel face numerous and significant problems upon discharge from the forces. The purpose of this paper is to explore experiences of the transition from military to civilian life and to identify some of the barriers and facilitators to re‐employment.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth interviews were carried out with 11 ex‐servicemen who had previously served in the UK armed forces and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA).

Findings

Participants described their experiences in terms of three broad themes: characteristics of a military life; loss as experienced upon return to civilian life; and the attempt to bridge the gap between these two lives. Transcending these themes was the notion of identity, illustrating that the transition from military to civilian life can be viewed as a shift in sense of self from soldier to civilian.

Research limitations/implications

The current study only recruited male ex‐service personnel and therefore the findings may not accurately represent the experiences of female service leavers.

Practical implications

The military needs to ensure that not only is support provided for all service personnel, but that it goes beyond basic vocational advice. Although the needs of ex‐service personnel are defined by factors other than unemployment, such as trauma or the sudden loss of security, they do relate back to unemployment in some capacity. Methodological changes to the discharge process could help this population to achieve a more continuous trajectory rather than a fragmented one.

Originality/value

The present study has provided further insight into the identity experiences of ex‐service personnel along their journey from soldier to civilian. Breakwell's Identity Process Theory provided a valuable framework for understanding the experiences of ex‐service personnel.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

M.C.M. Bricknell

Compares the methodology of the medical decision‐making process with that of the military. The key to both professions is reliable, efficient decision making. Effective…

Abstract

Compares the methodology of the medical decision‐making process with that of the military. The key to both professions is reliable, efficient decision making. Effective decision makers use the hypothetical‐deductive approach which utilizes intuition to generate ideas which are tested by the available evidence. Medicine is developing a holistic, conceptual and student‐centred education process which compares with the more rigid, external system of military training. The military system has a better methodology for communication both verbally and in writing than medicine. Suggests that both professions may benefit from an examination of each professional culture.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1971

DAVID ALLEN

In the last year or two the number of ad hoc record‐listing projects in this country has increased quite dramatically. After a long period during which any such…

Abstract

In the last year or two the number of ad hoc record‐listing projects in this country has increased quite dramatically. After a long period during which any such initiatives were few and far between, the regular, long‐term work of the major libraries and of the various central and local government record‐holding or ‐listing institutions is now being massively supplemented by a network of non‐official efforts, already numerous enough to amount to a distinct para‐activity of their own.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

B.N. Ellis

This paper gives a general survey of the methods of contamination control related to assembled printed circuits. Particular emphasis is given to those aspects of the…

Abstract

This paper gives a general survey of the methods of contamination control related to assembled printed circuits. Particular emphasis is given to those aspects of the subject which are currently in a state of change because of environmental difficulties, notably those due to the curtailment of use of chlorofluorocarbon solvents.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2009

Dahlia Shamsuddin

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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