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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2020

Fenio Annansingh

Currently, one of the most significant challenges organizations face is that corporate data is being delivered to mobile devices that are not managed by the information…

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229

Abstract

Purpose

Currently, one of the most significant challenges organizations face is that corporate data is being delivered to mobile devices that are not managed by the information technology department. This has security implications regarding knowledge leakage, data theft, and regulatory compliance. With these unmanaged devices, companies have less control and visibility, and fewer mitigation options when protecting against the risks of cyber-attacks. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate how millennials' use of personal mobile devices for work contributes to increased exposure to cyber-attacks and, consequently, security and knowledge leakage risks.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used a mixed-method approach by using survey questionnaires to elicit the views of millennials regarding the cybersecurity risks associated with bring your own device policies and practices. Interviews were done with security personnel. Data analysis consisted of descriptive analysis and open coding.

Findings

The results indicate that millennials expect to have ready access to technology and social media at all times, irrespective of security and privacy concerns. Companies also need to improve and enforce bring your own device policies and practices to mitigate against knowledge leakage and security risks. Millennials increasingly see the use of personal devices as a right and not a convenience. They are expecting security measures to be more seamless within the full user experience.

Originality/value

This paper can help organizations and millennials to understand the security risks entering the workforce if the threats of using privately owned devices on the job are ignored and to improve organizational performance.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

William P. Smith

This paper aims to (a) summarize the legal and ethical foundations of privacy with connections to workplace emails and text messages, (b) describe trends and challenges…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to (a) summarize the legal and ethical foundations of privacy with connections to workplace emails and text messages, (b) describe trends and challenges related to “Bring Your Own Device” (BYOD), and (c) propose legal and nonlegal questions these trends will raise in the foreseeable future.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a review of legal cases and scholarship related to workplace privacy, implications for BYOD practices are proposed.

Findings

Primarily due to property rights, employers in the USA have heretofore been granted wide latitude in monitoring employee communications. The BYOD trend has the potential to challenge this status quo.

Originality value

BYOD programs present discernable threats to employee privacy. Attention is also directed toward contributing elements such as wearable technology, cloud computing and company cultures.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Abstract

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2019

Zoe Chao, Steve Borrelli, Bikalpa Neupane and Joseph Fennewald

The purpose of this paper is to triangulate qualitative and quantitative data with existing data to inform on the function and user experience of a newly created the “News…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to triangulate qualitative and quantitative data with existing data to inform on the function and user experience of a newly created the “News Library,” and, further, to inform on the viability of “bring your own device spaces” (BYOD) in meeting the computing needs of Penn State University Park students through a multi-dimensional study.

Design/methodology/approach

This study leverages several methodologies for data collection, including observation, survey, flip chart prompts, interviews and focus groups.

Findings

Findings suggest that the News Library accommodates users’ social needs. However, it does not accommodate their communal needs well. The majority of students at the Penn State University Park campus, own laptops and bring them to the library when they intend to study. Personal device usage is preferable to library-provided computers per a familiarity with their personal device, access to personal files and independence of workspace.

Research limitations/implications

As this is a case study, the findings are not generalizable. This study was conducted in one library, on one campus at a 24-campus institution with over 30 libraries.

Originality/value

The mixed-methods study provides multiple views into user behaviors and expectations. The authors propose guidelines for informing the design of BYOD spaces.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Janak Adhikari, Anuradha Mathrani and Chris Scogings

Over the past few years, technology-mediated learning has established itself as a valuable pathway towards learners’ academic and social development. However, within the…

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2310

Abstract

Purpose

Over the past few years, technology-mediated learning has established itself as a valuable pathway towards learners’ academic and social development. However, within the adoption stages of information and communications technology-enabled education, further questions have been raised in terms of equity of information literacy and learning outcomes. For the past three years, the authors have been working with one of the earliest secondary schools in New Zealand to introduce a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policy. In this paper, the authors present the findings of a longitudinal investigation into the BYOD project, which offers new insights into the digital divide issues in the context of evolving teaching and learning practices across three levels, namely, digital access, digital capability and digital outcome.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is an empirically grounded longitudinal case research conducted over a three-year period in one secondary school in New Zealand. This research has included a number of methods, including surveys, interviews and classroom observations, to gather qualitative data from various stakeholders (teachers, students and parents).

Findings

The findings from the study of the BYOD project inform of digital divide issues in the context of evolving teaching and learning practices across formal and informal spaces. The authors explored how the BYOD policy has influenced existing divides in the learning process across three levels, namely, digital access, digital capability and digital outcome. The result sheds light on key issues affecting the learning process to contextualise factors in the three-level digital divide for the BYOD technology adoption process in classroom settings.

Research limitations/implications

The study presents findings from an ongoing investigation of one secondary school, an early adopter of the BYOD policy. While the authors have followed the school for three years, more in-depth studies on how teaching and learning practices are evolving across formal and informal spaces will be further qualified in the next stages of data collection.

Originality/value

The study contributes to new knowledge on how digital inclusion can be supported beyond mere access to meaningful use of technology to reinforce student learning and their overall skill development.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2020

Hao Chen, Ying Li, Lirong Chen and Jin Yin

While the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) trend provides benefits for employees, it also poses security risks to organizations. This study explores whether and how employees…

Abstract

Purpose

While the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) trend provides benefits for employees, it also poses security risks to organizations. This study explores whether and how employees decide to adopt BYOD practices when they encounter information security–related conflict.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey data from 235 employees of Chinese enterprises and applying partial least squares based structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM), we test a series of hypotheses.

Findings

The results suggest that information security–related conflict elicits information security fatigue among employees. As their information security fatigue increases, employees become less likely to adopt BYOD practices. In addition, information security–related conflict has an indirect effect on employee's BYOD adoption through the full mediation of information security fatigue.

Practical implications

This study provides practical implications to adopt BYOD in the workplace through conflict management measures and emotion management strategies. Conflict management measures focused on the reducing of four facets of information security–related conflict, such as improve organization's privacy policies and help employees to build security habits. Emotion management strategies highlighted the solutions to reduce fatigue through easing conflict, such as involving employees in the development or update of information security policies to voice their demands of privacy and other rights.

Originality/value

Our study extends knowledge by focusing on the barriers to employees' BYOD adoption when considering information security in the workplace. Specifically, this study takes a conflict perspective and builds a multi-faceted construct of information security–related conflict. Our study also extends information security behavior research by revealing an emotion-based mediation effect, that of information security fatigue, to explore the mechanism underlying the influence of information security–related conflict on employee behavior.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Cheri MacLeod

This paper describes a small research project undertaken in a technical college in Qatar on the use of iPads in the classroom. iPads were trialed for a semester each in…

Abstract

This paper describes a small research project undertaken in a technical college in Qatar on the use of iPads in the classroom. iPads were trialed for a semester each in mathematics and physics classes; students completed pre- and post-surveys. Classroom observations were carried out and interviews were conducted with both faculty (N=3) and students (N=19). Over 80% of students reported positively on the iPad as being “helpful” to “very helpful” for learning new things and course materials, for increasing their interaction with online course materials and getting course information and for exploring additional material related to course topics. Faculty perceptions of iPad use in class were also positive.

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Book part
Publication date: 6 February 2013

Lauren Miller Griffith and Brian A. Roberts

Using a navigational metaphor, this chapter introduces readers to the sometimes stormy seas of implementing new learning technologies into a course, especially those that…

Abstract

Using a navigational metaphor, this chapter introduces readers to the sometimes stormy seas of implementing new learning technologies into a course, especially those that have pre-existing design flaws (lack of rigor, accountability, content and time constraints, etc.). In addition to presenting what we feel are some best practices in using iOS devices, we analyze nearly 600 students’ reactions to these devices related to how they were used in a 100 level survey style course. For every student who told us that they were “awesome” or helped them “learn and discover new things through [the] course,” there were multiple students who felt that “they are damaging [the] learning experience because they are distracting.” The central argument of this chapter is that without engaging in a dialectic course (re)design process that puts the affordances of the learning technology in conversation with classic principles of instructional design, the utility of adding iOS devices will be limited at best and distracting at worst. The instructors in the course described here did use the devices in a variety of ways and many students were satisfied with the learning experience. However, for others, the combination of the course being too easy and too forgiving along with putting the Internet into students’ hands was a recipe for incivility and off-task uses of technology.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Classroom Technologies: Classroom Response Systems and Mediated Discourse Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-512-8

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Janak Adhikari, Chris Scogings, Anuradha Mathrani and Indu Sofat

The purpose of this paper is to seek answers to questions on how equity of information literacy and learning outcomes have evolved with the ongoing advances in…

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1474

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to seek answers to questions on how equity of information literacy and learning outcomes have evolved with the ongoing advances in technologies in teaching and learning across schools. The authors’ report on a five-year long bring your own device (BYOD) journey of one school, which was one of the earliest adopters of one-to-one learning devices in New Zealand.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a socio-cultural ecological lens for analysis, a longitudinal study has investigated aspects of how digital/information literacy, computer self-efficacy, and nature of technology usage are transforming school and classroom curriculum practices.

Findings

Findings of this study reveal a significant shift in social and academic boundaries between formal and informal learning spaces. One-to-one learning devices provide the link between school and home, as students take more ownership of their learning, and teachers become facilitators. Curricula changes and proper technological support systems introduced in the school structures have given agency to students resulting in greater acceptance of the BYOD policy and extensions to learning beyond formal classroom spaces. Digital divide amongst learners has evolved beyond equity in access and equity in capabilities to become more inclusive, thereby paving the way for equity in learning outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

This study has been conducted in a school which is located in a relatively high socio-economic region. To achieve a more holistic view, there is a need for further studies to be conducted in schools from low socio-economic communities.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the existing literature by sharing teacher reflections on their use of innovative pedagogies to bring changes to classroom curricular practice.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Brianna Bernadette Buljung and Karen Gale Cooper

This paper aims to describe the technology petting zoo developed and hosted by the National Defense University Library. It highlights the poster presentation given at the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the technology petting zoo developed and hosted by the National Defense University Library. It highlights the poster presentation given at the Special Libraries Association Conference held in Chicago on July 17, 2012. The project was voted best poster by attendees to the session.

Design/methodology/approach

Faced with a bringyourowndevice (BYOD) environment, NDU librarians implemented a technology petting zoo to inform patrons about the availability of the library's resources on personal computing devices. They overcame technology and security issues inherent in the NDU computing environment, and used the event to connect patrons directly with the library's downloadable electronic resources.

Findings

The event was successful, with more than 80 patrons in attendance. Through the experience, staff acquired knowledge and experience to better serve patrons with inquiries about online and downloadable materials. Patrons and library staff learned to use personal computers and devices to access library materials, especially downloadable ebooks, remotely.

Practical implications

The petting zoo model changed the way NDU staff and patrons interact with downloadable resources. Successfully hosting a zoo event is especially difficult in federal settings, but the NDU team established the means of supporting off‐site access while observing regulations.

Originality/value

This project has value for government libraries because it leverages the increasingly popular BYOD environment to connect patrons to important resources. The paper also has broad applications in the corporate sector because many corporate libraries are also working to facilitate increasing access to library resources within stringent security guidelines.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

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