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International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 44 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Abstract

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International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 44 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article

Brigitte de Faultrier , Jacques Boulay, Florence Feenstra and Laurent Muzellec

– The purpose of this paper is to develop an approach at defining a retail channel strategy applied to young consumers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an approach at defining a retail channel strategy applied to young consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a qualitative study that adopts the consumer perspective and employed an investiga-tive channel-scan approach based on two scenarios applied to 12 retailers selling childrenswear. The authors studied 139 flows between all the channels and explored the retailers’ child orientation.

Findings

The paper revealed that the channel configuration and integration of retailers showed a di-versity of approach leading us to distinguish eight different retail channel strategies. It also appears that there is limited evidence of a specific selling channels designed for children by retailers in selling products aimed at the child market.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the retail marking literature by showing evidence of child orienta-tion in channel management. Nevertheless, the results show the need for future research to understand the causes and effects of channel child orientation and the way it contributes to the retail channel strategy.

Practical implications

The findings have practical implications for retailers by providing a framework to help them in their decision-making regarding retail channel strategy. It also sheds new light on the con-tribution from young consumers in retail channel strategy.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper is to explore the combined perspective of configuration and integration of the channel-to-market as part of the retail channel strategy. The paper also provides evidence of child orientation in retail channel strategy when retailers selling prod-ucts for children are concerned.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 42 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 42 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article

Laurent Muzellec, Florence Feenstra, Brigitte de Faultrier and Jacques Boulay

The purpose of this paper is to describe the nature of a branded mobile application experience for children, and analyse how these experiences affect the children’s and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the nature of a branded mobile application experience for children, and analyse how these experiences affect the children’s and parents’ brand perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a qualitative approach focussing on the consumer perspective. Children were asked to use two selected applications from an I-Pad tablet (“La Grande Récré” – A1 and “MonkiMi” – A2). Children and parents were subsequently interviewed.

Findings

Children primarily valued the emotional experience of the application (app). The parents appreciated their children’s cognitive experience of the mobile app. Parents are much more responsive to mobile application communication, as they perceive to have more control over this new media and value the cognitive and emotional dimension of their children experience of the app.

Research limitations/implications

The study shows that branded apps can be an extremely effective way in delivering valuable brand content which positively impact brand perceptions. This initial and exploratory study calls for further extensive research in this area.

Practical implications

This research demonstrates the untapped potential of sponsored apps as a communication medium.

Originality/value

The paper indicates that mobile applications constitute a new communication channel for retailers and brand owners to interact at an emotional level with their existing or prospective customers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 44 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article

Jacques Boulay, Brigitte de Faultrier , Florence Feenstra and Laurent Muzellec

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the preferences of children under the age of 12 regarding sales channels: how young consumers perceive online vs offline…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the preferences of children under the age of 12 regarding sales channels: how young consumers perceive online vs offline shopping in terms of advantages and disadvantages. Within a cross channel perspective, it also analyses the connections they make between brick-and-mortar and online stores.

Design/methodology/approach

Results are drawn from an exploratory and qualitative study based on a multi-category approach. In all, 62 children (34 girls and 28 boys) aged six to 12 years were interviewed about the advantages and disadvantages of each channel for shopping; how/where they would prefer to shop and why; and the links they make between a brand’s physical store and an online store.

Findings

Traditional sales outlets are more popular with six to 12 year olds than online shopping. Physical stores offer variety and instant gratification. Products can be tried out and tested on-site, making the offline retail experience a fun activity. Conversely, children express a very negative perception of e-retailing, which they often consider to be dishonest, offering limited choice at higher prices. When shopping online, delivery time can be a deterrent. Last but not least, no cross-channel shopping perceptions were found.

Practical implications

Several results from this study can inform marketing practices at retailers’ headquarters. Store assortment, product availability and store atmospherics are central to the success of offline shopping among six- to 12-year-old children. Retailers should find ways to transfer this relational approach to their online strategy. In the meantime, they must deliver the same basic promises as in stores: a wide choice and competitive prices, no shortage of products and no late delivery.

Originality/value

This study adds to the existing body of knowledge on children’s consumer behaviour in three ways. First, it provides new insight into how children perceive not the internet per se but online shopping. Second, it confirms that stores still play a dominant role in shaping the image of a retail brand, from an early age. Third, it suggests that the cross-channel perspective may not apply to very young consumers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 42 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article

Nathalie Nicol

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of “shopscapes” the authors define as the imaginary geography each person or group of people builds based on his…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of “shopscapes” the authors define as the imaginary geography each person or group of people builds based on his daily experiences and practices in reference to retail environments and activities and to apply it to children.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop an original and child-centred methodology, by combining drawings and interviews and the authors focus the approach, not on the final drawings but on the drawing activity per se where children work in pairs and collaborate.

Findings

The authors demonstrate the validity of the approach by proposing that a drawing can only be validly interpreted through the content of an open verbal exchange with its author/s. The activity of drawing, and of mapping when “shopscapes” are questioned, is interestingly richer and more fruitful than just the final result.

Originality/value

The originality of the work lies in the concept of shopscapes and in the methodology used in order to reveal them. The authors intend to reveal the nature and range of children’s “shopscapes” with the objective of providing reliable information about on how children perceive the retailing experience.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 42 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article

Herbert Kotzab, Hilde M. Munch, Brigitte de Faultrier and Christoph Teller

The purpose of this paper is to develop a scale that evaluates the environmental elements in retail supply chains and to examine the environmental supply chain management…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a scale that evaluates the environmental elements in retail supply chains and to examine the environmental supply chain management initiatives of the world's largest 100 retailing companies.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical evaluation has been undertaken through an investigative approach applying a web‐scan framework which included the analysis of web sites and publicly published documents such as annual reports and corporate social responsibility reports.

Findings

The authors identified 34 environmental sustainability initiatives which were grouped into eight categories; they refer to “fundamental environmental attitude”, “use of energy”, “use of input material”, “product”, “packaging”, “transport”, “consumption” and “waste”. The level of environmental supply chain management can be characterised as very operational and very short‐term oriented (green operations). Long‐term oriented green design initiatives were hardly observed. Furthermore, the specific environmental activities of three retailers from Denmark, France and the UK were compared.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical study investigates supply chain operations of retailers and excludes other areas of retail management. The results are based on material that is published by the respective companies and thus do not include internal reports.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this paper is to test the proposition that global retailers follow the path of the “Greening Goliaths”, where environmental sustainability becomes a quasi industry standard for the ecological sustainability transformation of global retailing.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 39 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article

Monali Hota and Karine Charry

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of recalling visual and child-oriented product packaging elements vs informational content on children’s influence on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of recalling visual and child-oriented product packaging elements vs informational content on children’s influence on household purchases.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted using quantitative research among 100 French consumers of breakfast cereals aged six to 11.

Findings

The paper challenges previous findings. First, the recall of the various types of packaging elements was equivalent across age groups. Second, the impact of visual and child-oriented element recall on purchase influences was high, especially for younger children, but not superior to the impact of recalling informational packaging elements. Third, adding information and other elements to visuals reduced young children’s intentions to influence purchases, suggesting that the overload – not the nature – of elements has a negative impact. Fourth, packaging recall seemed weakly related to purchase influence – at least for well-known brands.

Research limitations/implications

Further research on larger samples will allow to encompass potential moderators such as brand context, consumer context and packaging stimulus. Research should also compare the positive (reassuring) influence of adding informational elements on mothers to the negative one it has on children’s influence.

Practical implications

These findings can be used to wisely plan retailers’ packaging strategy. But all in all, retail packaging represents only one of the many factors which impact upon children’s diet and food consumptions and should be reassessed in the face other influences.

Originality/value

The findings challenge and expand one’s knowledge on the relationship between children and the relative influence of child-oriented elements and information, across age groups.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 42 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article

David Marshall

Children are increasingly seen as active consumers participating in various aspects of family food consumption. The purpose of this paper is to look at children’s…

Abstract

Purpose

Children are increasingly seen as active consumers participating in various aspects of family food consumption. The purpose of this paper is to look at children’s first-hand accounts of their visits to the supermarket and reports on their in store experiences as participants in the family food shopping. It offers an account of family food shopping from the perspective of the children.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative discussion groups with children aged eight to 11 years research were used to elicit children’s perceptions of food shopping as part of a study into food consumption experiences. This offers an opportunity to capture the children’s perspective on this everyday consumption activity.

Findings

Engaging in family food shopping is part of a socialisation process that introduces children to food retail environments and to shopping scripts played out in store. Young children claim to actively participate in family food shopping in store contributing in a variety of ways to family food purchases that includes making requests in store, negotiating over product choices and assisting with the food shopping. The strategies employed by the children include restricting requests to specific product categories (usually for sweets, or cereals or products for their school lunchbox); selecting products on behalf of other family members; dissuading parents for buying certain food items and helping out in store. Most of the first-hand accounts reflect a positive experience with children contributing to the food decisions that relate directly to their interests. The research finds relatively little conflict and more co-operation between children and their parents in an attempt to influence what goes into the shopping trolley.

Research limitations/implications

This is a small exploratory study with a geographically constrained sample. The children’s accounts cannot be verified but are presented as a way of looking at how children themselves relate to the family food shopping experience. Future research might extend the geographical scope of this investigation and consider soliciting parental views to validate the children’s accounts.

Practical implications

This work provides further evidence of the ways in which children are actively included as part of family food decisions in a supermarket context. Children’s in store contributions to family food can inform retailers and companies as well as policy makers.

Originality/value

This offers a unique insight into how children view shopping with the family and relates more broadly to the discussion around children’s consumption and their role as active consumers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 42 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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