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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Brian Sealy

Most libraries already have some documentation. Software vendors provide manuals for the “out‐of‐the‐box” programs they sell. The bibliographic utilities also provide…

Abstract

Most libraries already have some documentation. Software vendors provide manuals for the “out‐of‐the‐box” programs they sell. The bibliographic utilities also provide documentation, which libraries use for guidance on entering data into the utilities. System documentation may exist also in scattered guides, “cheat sheets,” and “how to” manuals that have been developed for staff use as the need has arisen. Relevant documentation may reside even in non‐library sources. With all this existing documentation, one might conclude that there is no need for yet more system documentation. Yet it is precisely because of the scattered nature of the documentation, the selective use of these sources, the inadequacy of some of the sources, and, most importantly, the need for standardized input into the database that there is a need to develop adequate documentation for a particular library's system.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Rob Kairis

As more libraries automate for the First time or migrate to more sophisticated integrated systems in a time of fiscal restraint and, in many cases, down‐sized staffing…

Abstract

As more libraries automate for the First time or migrate to more sophisticated integrated systems in a time of fiscal restraint and, in many cases, down‐sized staffing, the ability to automate as many functions as possible (particularly tedious ones, such as database cleanup) would seem desirable. The project described in this article is a good example. If the microcomputer program for cleaning up Kent State University's NOTIS database was not written, the project, which probably should have begun years ago, would still not have been implemented. The solution presented here addresses these key issues realistically, within the confines of the programming resources available within many libraries.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Katherine B. Killoran

In today's society with concern for crime and violence increasing and court television and celebrity trials bringing the criminal justice system, courtroom procedures, and…

Abstract

In today's society with concern for crime and violence increasing and court television and celebrity trials bringing the criminal justice system, courtroom procedures, and rules of evidence into our living rooms, there is an increased need for reliable information about issues that are the core of forensic science: crime scene investigation and the collection and scientific analysis of physical evidence used in trials.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2011

Kevin P. Brady is currently an associate professor in the Department of Leadership, Policy, Adult, and Higher Education at North Carolina State University in Raleigh…

Abstract

Kevin P. Brady is currently an associate professor in the Department of Leadership, Policy, Adult, and Higher Education at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, North Carolina. Previously, Dr. Brady was an assistant professor in the Department of Educational and Community Programs at the City University of New York-Queens College. His current research interests include legal and educational policy issues involving student discipline, including zero tolerance discipline policies and the viability of school–police partnerships. Additionally, Dr. Brady's recent scholarship has examined issues relating to student and teacher free speech and expression, special education law, school finance, and educational technology issues involving today's school leaders. Dr. Brady's peer-reviewed scholarship appears in a wide array of leading educational law, policy, and technology-based journals including, the Brigham Young University Education and Law Journal, Children's Legal Rights Journal, Distance Education, Education and the Law, Education and Urban Society, Journal of Education Finance, Journal of Interactive Online Learning, Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, Journal of School Leadership, International Journal of Educational Reform, NASSP Bulletin, Review of Research in Education, and West's Education Law Reporter.

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Leadership in Education, Corrections and Law Enforcement: A Commitment to Ethics, Equity and Excellence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-185-5

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Mathias Guenther

The purpose of this paper is to explain the discrepancy between ethnohistorical accounts on north-western Kalahari San of the nineteenth to early twentieth century and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the discrepancy between ethnohistorical accounts on north-western Kalahari San of the nineteenth to early twentieth century and recent ethnographic accounts, the former depicting the San as intensely warlike, the latter as basically peaceable.

Design/methodology/approach

Review of historical, ethnohistorical and ethnographic source material (reports, journal articles, monographs).

Findings

The warlike ways of the nineteenth-century Kalahari San were reactions to settler intrusion, domination and encapsulation. This was met with resistance, a process that led to the rapid politicization and militarization, socially and ideationally, of San groups in the orbit of the intruders (especially the “tribal zone” they created). It culminated in internecine warfare, specifically raiding and feuding, amongst San bands and tribal groupings.

Research limitations/implications

While the nineteenth-century Kalahari San were indeed warlike and aggressive, toward both intruders and one another, this fact does not warrant the conclusion that these “simple” hunter-gatherer people have an agonistic predisposition. Instead, of being integral to their sociality, bellicosity is historically contingent. In the absence of the historical circumstances that fuel San aggression and warfare, as was the case after and before the people's exposure and resistance to hegemonic intruders, San society and ethos, in conformity with the social structure and value orientation of simple, egalitarian band societies, is basically peaceful.

Originality/value

A setting-the-record-straight corrective on current misunderstandings and misinformation on hunter-gatherer warfare.

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2021

Alison Sheridan, Linley Lord and Anne Ross-Smith

The purpose of this paper is to identify how board recruitment processes have been impacted by the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) governance changes requiring listed…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify how board recruitment processes have been impacted by the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) governance changes requiring listed boards to report annually on their gender diversity policy and profile.

Design/methodology/approach

Employing a social constructivist approach, the research analyses interviews conducted with matched samples of board directors and stakeholders in 2010 and 2017 about board recruitment in ASX50 companies.

Findings

The introduction of ASX guidelines requiring gender reporting disrupted traditional board appointment processes. Women's gender capital gained currency, adding an additional dimension to the high levels of human and social capital seen as desirable for board appointments. The politics of women's presence is bringing about changes to the discourse and practice about who should/can be a director. The authors identify highly strategic ways in which women's gender capital has been used to agitate for more women to be appointed to boards.

Research limitations/implications

While sample sizes are small, data within the themes cohered meaningfully across the time periods, making visible how women's presence in the board room has been reframed. Future research could consider what this may mean for board dynamics and how enduring are these changes.

Practical implications

This study highlights the forms that human and social capital take in board appointments, which can be instructive for potential directors, and how these intersect with gender capital. The insights from the study are relevant to board recruitment committees seeking to reflect their commitment to a more gender equitable environment.

Originality/value

There has been a recalibration of men's and women's gender capital in board appointments, and there is now a currency in femaleness disrupting the historical privilege afforded “maleness”.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Susan Chaplinsky, Felicia C. Marston and Michael Pozzi

This case and its companion, UVA-F-1560, were awarded the 2012 Wachovia Award for Excellence in Teaching Materials - Innovative Case. In November 2006, Alec Berg, a…

Abstract

This case and its companion, UVA-F-1560, were awarded the 2012 Wachovia Award for Excellence in Teaching Materials - Innovative Case. In November 2006, Alec Berg, a successful hedge fund manager, must decide whether to invest in the initial public offering (IPO) of the Hertz Corporation. The IPO followed a leveraged buyout (LBO) of Hertz that was completed in December 2005 by three prominent private equity firms that had combined to purchase Hertz from the Ford Motor Company for $14.9 billion. The LBO sponsors had borrowed an additional $1 billion on top of the buyout financing to pay themselves a special dividend in June 2006. This loan would be repaid with the IPO proceeds and any remaining proceeds from the IPO would go to the sponsors. The IPO generated widespread criticism with respect to the speed with which the IPO was conducted and the payment of special dividends. In the face of this criticism, the demand for the Hertz IPO weakened, and the offer price was reduced from the initial file price range of $16–$18 to just $15. Berg must assess whether at $15 per share, Hertz offers an attractive investment for this fund. The case provides the necessary information for students to analyze the sponsors' returns on their investment in Hertz and the attractiveness of the $15 offer price to public shareholders. The case also offers an opportunity for students to discuss the controversy surrounding the payment of special dividends and the claim that private equity sponsors invest with a long-term perspective that creates value for the company.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Keywords

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