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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1982

Brian N. McKibbin

Physical distribution costs now account for at least 12% of industry's total sales revenue; there is also a substantial shift in distribution expenditure among the…

Abstract

Physical distribution costs now account for at least 12% of industry's total sales revenue; there is also a substantial shift in distribution expenditure among the principal cost elements. For example, freight transport now accounts for some 30% of distribution budgets. This is one of the findings which has emerged from the National Survey of Distribution Costs, launched by the Centre for PDM last year and carried out by PW International. In this feature, Brian McKibbin outlines the major trends now emerging from the Survey and assesses the signifance of the preliminary results in providing a yardstick against which individual companies may measure their own PDM cost performance.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1981

Brian N McKibbin

In the mid‐1970s Mothercare decided to establish a new distribution centre and mail order warehouse; a number of alternative order picking systems were considered for the…

Abstract

In the mid‐1970s Mothercare decided to establish a new distribution centre and mail order warehouse; a number of alternative order picking systems were considered for the company's world‐wide mail order operation. This article examines the various alternatives and describes the system which was finally selected — a carousel storage and selection arrangement. Current performance statistics of the system are provided which are related to Mothercare's sales volumes.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1972

THE profession served by this journal lost an outstanding personality when Dr. Lillian Moller Gilbreth died at the age of 93 on January 2nd. As wife and business partner…

Abstract

THE profession served by this journal lost an outstanding personality when Dr. Lillian Moller Gilbreth died at the age of 93 on January 2nd. As wife and business partner to her husband, Frank Bunker Gilbreth, she was one of the pioneers of motion study. It required rare courage for a shy and retiring person like herself to take over the responsibilities of her husband when he died suddenly in 1924. Yet within three days of that event, after a family conference about the future, she sailed for Europe to fulfil an engagement of her husband to speak at the First Congress of Scientific Management in Prague.

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Work Study, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Book part
Publication date: 20 August 1996

Abstract

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The Peace Dividend
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44482-482-0

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Book part
Publication date: 20 August 1996

Abstract

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The Peace Dividend
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44482-482-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Angeline Tay

The purpose of MBA education is to provide training in the theory and practice of business management. In Malaysia, several public and private institutions of higher…

Abstract

The purpose of MBA education is to provide training in the theory and practice of business management. In Malaysia, several public and private institutions of higher learning offer such programmes. A survey of 112 organizations revealed that 67 per cent had executives with MBA degrees in their employment while the rest cited demand for high salaries and company policy to promote internal staff as two main reasons for not doing so. About 73 per cent said that they had no special preference for graduates from specific business schools. MBAs with good work ethics, sound management and leadership skills as well as critical thinking and analytical abilities, are more likely to be hired. In future, employers expect more MBAs with the ability to understand local, Asian and global business practices.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Loong Wong

This paper aims to examine the current financial crisis, suggesting that most analyses have attributed the crisis to a lack of business ethics, the rise of greed and lax…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the current financial crisis, suggesting that most analyses have attributed the crisis to a lack of business ethics, the rise of greed and lax regulation. Prescriptions offered to address this crisis draw accordingly on the need for greater regulation of market behaviour, business practices and boardroom pay. Whilst these reforms are necessary, they fail to recognise that such business practices have their roots in an extreme political and economic ideology – neoliberal market fundamentalism. This paper seeks to suggests that a greater appreciation of the nexus between politics, philosophy and economics is critical in order to develop a different practice. As such, the author provides a socio‐historical and political context for understanding the present crisis before offering a critique and reform of the business educational agenda. The author argues that such a context would engender greater understanding of business practices and systems for both students and practitioners and would go some way in enabling them to fashion a more critical reflexive and engaged practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on a critical‐historical review of the literature on the crisis. In so doing, the paper opens up the analysis to philosophical and political approaches to understanding financial crises.

Findings

The paper finds that explanations for the crisis can be found through a critical appreciation of philosophical and political texts. This finding also suggests that current business and management education and practices can benefit from an incorporation of these historical strands of thought.

Research limitations/implications

In drawing on various strands in philosophy, politics, economics and sociology, the paper finds that a singular account for the crisis is flawed. The paper also finds that a richer and deeper appreciation of the crisis can be found through a critical‐historical positioning of the crisis. This necessitates an understanding of politics and philosophy in business practices and education.

Practical implications

In explaining the crisis, the paper suggests that many of the current financial “innovations” are problematic and a more critical approach is needed to engage with these “new” innovations.

Originality/value

The paper seeks to open up new vistas for business education and practices. Through a critical‐historical interrogation of the crisis, the paper opens up new spaces for understanding international economics and business practices. This reflexivity is often missing in international business studies and most management practices.

Details

Critical perspectives on international business, vol. 5 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

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