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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1973

Denning, L.J. Stamp and L.J. James

February 27, 1973 Redundancy — Calculation of payment — “Normal working hours” — Workmen employed under contract of employment incorporating national agreement — Normal…

Abstract

February 27, 1973 Redundancy — Calculation of payment — “Normal working hours” — Workmen employed under contract of employment incorporating national agreement — Normal working week 40 hours actual work — Condition of national agreement that “all workers shall” work overtime in accordance with demands of industry — Workmen regularly working at least 57 hours a week — Whether normal working hours for redundancy payment purposes including overtime where no obligation on employer to provide guaranteed overtime for fixed number of hours — Contracts of Employment Act 1963 (11 & 12 Eliz.II, c.49) Sch.2 para.l(l)(2).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Brian Lockwood

Although many studies have examined the correlates of homicide clearance rates, few analyses have examined the factors related to the clearance of burglary offenses. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Although many studies have examined the correlates of homicide clearance rates, few analyses have examined the factors related to the clearance of burglary offenses. The purpose of this paper is to address several gaps in the literature to determine if burglary clearance rates are due to discretionary, non-discretionary, and/or neighborhood contextual factors.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are analyzed from more than 10,000 burglary incidents in Philadelphia from 2010 using multilevel models to simultaneously test for the influence of multiple perspectives of the factors of crime clearance.

Findings

The results indicate that variables representing broken windows enforcement, discretionary factors, and non-discretionary factors are related to the increased likelihood that burglaries are cleared, but processes associated with social disorganization within communities is not.

Research limitations/implications

The findings contribute to the literature by showing that future examinations of the factors of burglary clearance should consider community contextual factors, and specifically, that broken windows police enforcement appears to be a more important predictor of burglary clearance than do factors related to social disorganization theory. As a result, it is suggested that law enforcement also consider their tactics regarding low-level offenses if they wish to address the clearance rate of burglaries.

Originality/value

This analysis is among the first to examine multiple perspectives of the factors of crime clearance on burglary incidents.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 May 2003

Jonathan L Gifford

Abstract

Details

Flexible Urban Transportation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-050656-2

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1979

After great Wars, the years that follow are always times of disquiet and uncertainty; the country is shabby and exhausted, but beneath it, there is hope, expectancy, nay…

170

Abstract

After great Wars, the years that follow are always times of disquiet and uncertainty; the country is shabby and exhausted, but beneath it, there is hope, expectancy, nay! certainty, that better times are coming. Perhaps the golden promise of the fifties and sixties failed to mature, but we entered the seventies with most people confident that the country would turn the corner; it did but unfortunately not the right one! Not inappropriate they have been dubbed the “striking seventies”. The process was not one of recovery but of slow, relentless deterioration. One way of knowing how your country is going is to visit others. At first, prices were cheaper that at home; the £ went farther and was readily acceptabble, but year by year, it seemed that prices were rising, but it was in truth the £ falling in value; no longer so easily changed. Most thinking Continentals had only a sneer for “decadent England”. Kinsmen from overseas wanted to think well of us but simply could not understand what was happening.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 81 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2022

Yasmin Ibrahim

This introductory chapter opens up with the notion of ‘technologies of trauma’ and the appropriation of trauma as a cultural form in modernity aided by technologies of…

Abstract

This introductory chapter opens up with the notion of ‘technologies of trauma’ and the appropriation of trauma as a cultural form in modernity aided by technologies of vision and sound. Trauma in modernity has been intimately welded with witnessing and testimony, illuminating an inter-relationship with technologies which simulates our senses and affect, with its capacities to re-present past events through present consciousness, and its ability to produce a moral economy in their own right. Humanity's reliance on technologies to narrate and circulate trauma as a cultural form of exchange and transaction articulates a moment of transcendence in which media as cultural artefacts reconfigure trauma as a cultural form. The notion of second-hand witnessing and the simulation of trauma as a shared and popular genre unleashes trauma as a resonant genre bound with technologies which renew human bonds. Equally it can be reduced to fiction or give way to compassion fatigue. In historically tracing the movement of technologies of trauma as a cultural form over time from televisual witnessing to its aesthetic or perverse renditions in the digital age, the chapter discerns trauma's machinic bind and its enactment as a cultural artefact couched within the sensorium of affect and ethics. The development of mass technological forms over time, from print to the digital age, also concerns the rise of trauma as a cultural form in terms of witnessing, testimony, memorializing, mourning and commemoration. Within these configurations the traumatized human figure is submerged through time as one equally enacted and abstracted through the formats of technology and consumption.

Details

Technologies of Trauma
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-135-8

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Elizabeth D. Smolensky and Brian H. Kleiner

Making the most of one′s resources is critical to the success ofany manager and those who are able to train their staff to thinkcreatively maximize one of the most…

1547

Abstract

Making the most of one′s resources is critical to the success of any manager and those who are able to train their staff to think creatively maximize one of the most valuable assets available to any company: brain power. Re‐examines creativity in relation to the working environment and corporate attitudes. Claims that training in various creativity techniques can open new vistas to every employee willing to try a new approach; and that managers must learn to manage the newly energized team. Finds that the process can result in a powerful, more committed workforce, and a company prepared for the future and its challenges.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2022

Yasmin Ibrahim

Mediated trauma pumped through information and communication technologies (ICTs), in highlighting the shared vulnerabilities and precarity of human lives, is also invested…

Abstract

Mediated trauma pumped through information and communication technologies (ICTs), in highlighting the shared vulnerabilities and precarity of human lives, is also invested in the re-distribution and re-articulation of wounding and violence. This chapter examines what is transacted in the dissemination of human trauma through ICTs and how, within this affective architecture, we can come to understand the notions of wounding and woundedness as a pervasive condition of modernity invoking the human figure as continuously transgressed with the enlargement of trauma as a site of the political, visceral and commemorative whilst raising questions over our human qualities to feel as a community of affect through technologies which transmute trauma as part of their material commodification. The transmuting of trauma through technologies in the digital age means that trauma is re-absorbed as data and altered through its platform economics. Equally, trauma can be refracted through the digital terrain as banal content in which the wounded human becomes a transacted form within an incongruous spectrum ranging from the politics of pity to voyeurism. In the digital economy, trauma imagery enters another realm of disorientation in which it is pulled into typologies and vast ahistorical image repertories that hold non-contextual image as data. The digital economy re-modulates trauma through its own modes of (il)logic and turbulence, patterning trauma through its own modes of violence.

Details

Technologies of Trauma
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-135-8

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1975

R.M. THORPE and B. WHITTINGTON

In the past few years a new debate has started and blossomed among those concerned with British university administration. It has centred around the lack of specific…

Abstract

In the past few years a new debate has started and blossomed among those concerned with British university administration. It has centred around the lack of specific provision of training for university administrators. This research is a reflection of this debate. In an attempt to provide, firstly, information which would facilitate the construction of a course appropriate for “middle grade” administrators and, secondly, knowledge of a more general kind on the weaknesses of present administrator training, the authors carried out an attitudinal survey by postal questionnaire of 52 university and university college institutions in Britain. Interest focussed upon the training needs perceived by middle range administrators. This information was used to construct a course for these administrators which was offered at the University of Bradford in September 1973. Further, biographical and attitudinal data were used to attempt to explain variations in perceived training need. A consideration of several propositions suggested to explain such apparent variations served to indicate the evident need for more training in these techniques, either through the perceived need of a majority of respondents, or through the respondents' self confessed lack of knowledge about the applicability of these techniques. The authors conclude with a call for more non‐survey data based research into training needs and the expansion of specific university administrative training in management techniques.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1966

AFTER some unsuccessful negotiations during the period when the first full‐time schools of librarianship were being established, the Birmingham School was founded in the…

Abstract

AFTER some unsuccessful negotiations during the period when the first full‐time schools of librarianship were being established, the Birmingham School was founded in the autumn of 1950. Circumstances were not entirely favourable—the immediate post‐war generation of enthusiastic ex‐service students had already passed through other schools; the accommodation available was indifferent; the administrative support was bad; resources were weak, both in books and in equipment. There was, more importantly, a strong local tradition of part‐time classes in librarianship and little or no conviction that full‐time study was necessary or desirable.

Details

New Library World, vol. 67 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

Edward Valauskas

Buses to ride: NuBus, MCA, EISA. Imagine a computer giant like IBM defending its choice of an input/output conductor for its Personal System/2 line of computers with…

Abstract

Buses to ride: NuBus, MCA, EISA. Imagine a computer giant like IBM defending its choice of an input/output conductor for its Personal System/2 line of computers with television commercials comparing the innards of a computer to an expressway, packets of data moving like vehicles in traffic scrambling to avoid backups due to obsolete or non‐proprietary architectures. These commercials have appeared in response to the first organized effort by a group of computer manufacturers to circumvent IBM's proprietary Micro Channel Architecture (MCA) with their own design, called EISA (Extended Industry Standard Architecture). Why is there such concern over bus architectures, and how does the Macintosh solution, the NuBus, compare?

Details

Library Workstation Report, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1041-7923

1 – 10 of 61