Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 27 June 2022

Frank Badu-Baiden, Seongseop (Sam) Kim, Felix Elvis Otoo and Brian King

This study aims to examine international tourists’ local African food consumption experiences by using an attribute–benefit–value–intention (ABVI) framework.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine international tourists’ local African food consumption experiences by using an attribute–benefit–value–intention (ABVI) framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 336 respondents were collected in Ghana, Africa. A series of quantitative research methods were used in the data analysis to explicate the relationships.

Findings

By assessing critical structural relationships, 8 out of 14 hypothetical relationships were found to be empirically supported. They include the paths between food novelty, restaurant quality and food quality as antecedents of epistemic value, the path between restaurant quality and food quality and the path between restaurant quality and consumption value.

Originality/value

This study establishes the psychological mechanism behind tourists’ local food consumption experiences and further extends the utility of the consumption value theory and ABVI framework into the local food experience context. It confirms that tourists’ local food consumption experiences involve a sequential psychological process involving local food attribute evaluation, benefits sought, consumption values and future intention. This study offers a thorough explanation of variables that are crucial to promoting indigenous ethnic food consumption experience.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2016

Brian L. King

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of the Internet, and more specifically social media, on franchise business models.

1759

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of the Internet, and more specifically social media, on franchise business models.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of both franchising and Internet literatures enables the creation of a simple model that distinguishes between surface waves, highly visible innovations that influence a restricted set of franchise business models, and deep waves that have a broader and more long-lasting influence on all franchises.

Findings

The first Internet era had a surface wave, online selling, that impacted relatively few franchises, but the deep wave of the wide availability of information and training materials has had a broader and more sustained impact on franchise systems. Similarly, Web 2.0’s social element has created a surface wave, the shared economy for hotels and cars, that affects relatively few franchises, but the deep wave of user-rating Web sites and Apps promises to have a broader and more long-lasting influence.

Research limitations/implications

This paper enables researchers identify potential research topics, highlighting the need to determine the impact of social media on how consumers perceive quality and the influence this has on their ongoing behavior.

Practical implications

This paper helps practitioners understand how the Internet influences the competitive balance between franchised and non-franchised businesses. Hence, it will be of interest to any large organization that offers high quality decentralized products or services, as they typically either franchise or compete with franchised businesses. As well, for entrepreneurs considering investing in a franchise, this paper will help identify which business models are more sustainable in the face of Internet innovation.

Originality/value

The surface wave/deep wave model is a new approach to analyzing the long-term impact of the Internet on all decentralized businesses.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2021

Teerawut Chanyasak, Mehmet Ali Koseoglu, Brian King and Omer Faruk Aladag

This study aims to explore how hotels adapt their business models as a strategic response to crisis situations. It sheds light on the processes and methods of business…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how hotels adapt their business models as a strategic response to crisis situations. It sheds light on the processes and methods of business model adaptation during severe crisis situations, such as the COVID-19 outbreak.

Design/methodology/approach

A single-case study was conducted. Data were collected from the owner/manager of a boutique hotel chain in Chiang Mai, Thailand through an extensive interviewing process. The authors also examined corporate documents. The authors then re-organized the material as a coherent narrative about how the company navigated the COVID-19 crisis.

Findings

The findings show that the hotels in the study adapted their business models by cutting costs through stopping non-essential operations, increasing non-room revenues and adding new revenue channels, bringing in cash from advance bookings, securing financial support from creditors, leveraging government support and training staff for the “new normal.”

Originality/value

Few previous studies have focused on business model adaptation during the COVID-19 crisis. The investigation of this largely neglected area provides two main contributions. First, it extends the literature on crisis management in hospitality firms by examining business model adaptation patterns and processes during unprecedented crisis conditions. Second, it provides managerial insights and a business model adjustment framework to help practitioners in urban settings in their efforts toward recovery from the COVID crisis.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 January 2021

Zahed Ghaderi, Brian King and C. Michael Hall

Crisis planning and improvements to business resilience are increasingly significant aspects of hotel management. This study investigates the crisis preparation of hotel…

Abstract

Purpose

Crisis planning and improvements to business resilience are increasingly significant aspects of hotel management. This study investigates the crisis preparation of hotel managers in Malaysia and how their perceptions affect crisis planning and preparation.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research method of semi-structured interviews with 24 hospitality managers in Malaysia was conducted. Data were analysed thematically using ATLAS.ti software, version 8.

Findings

The findings showed that crisis preparation among Malaysian hospitality firms is relatively neglected. Hotel crisis preparation schemes are greatly influenced by senior managers' intentions and organizational culture. Organizational resilience also has a significant role in hotel crisis planning and preparedness. Interestingly, in terms of long-term adaptation, hotels were less inclined to be “learning organizations” and managers were reluctant to change their organizational established structures, core beliefs and practice sustained resiliency in crisis preparation.

Practical implications

Understanding the crisis preparation of hospitality managers is important to develop effective strategies for different crises considering their severity and urgency. This study identified influential organizational and personal factors which affect crisis preparation of hospitality managers in Malaysia. The study further recommends a proactive mindset in crisis preparation of hotels.

Originality/value

Crisis preparation of hospitality managers had received limited attention, and this study highlights how managers consider crisis planning and preparation.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 September 2018

Mingjie Ji and Brian King

Scholars have rarely applied an embodied perspective when studying hospitality experiences. They have given even less attention to methodological considerations. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Scholars have rarely applied an embodied perspective when studying hospitality experiences. They have given even less attention to methodological considerations. This paper aims to introduce Zaltman’s Metaphor elicitation Technique (ZMET) to explore various domains of the embodied experience.

Design/methodology/approach

In demonstrating the applicability of the ZMET procedure to understanding embodied hospitality experiences, the researchers present a study of emotional encounters that involve the dining experiences of Chinese tourists with Western cuisine. The focus of the paper is on data collection, i.e. detailing the step-wise procedures of ZMET that have received minimal scholarly attention.

Findings

Through the medium of this empirical study, the ZMET example uncovers deep metaphors and answers previously unanswered questions about embodied experiences. The detailed information and nuanced insights that are generated through this ZMET application offer the prospect of enhanced understanding of the hospitality experience.

Originality/value

This investigation contributes an innovative research method to the embodied experience in the hospitality and tourism context.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2019

Jiaqi (Gemma) Luo, IpKin Anthony Wong, Brian King, Matthew Tingchi Liu and GuoQiong Huang

This study draws on the service-dominant (S-D) logic paradigm to examine value co-creation and co-destruction. As these phenomena are driven by positive and negative…

3121

Abstract

Purpose

This study draws on the service-dominant (S-D) logic paradigm to examine value co-creation and co-destruction. As these phenomena are driven by positive and negative “customer-to-customer” (C2C) interactions, this paper aims to examine their influence on tourist perceptions of service quality and how they shape affective responses toward tourism and hospitality services and brand loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a comprehensive literature review, the authors used convenience sampling to gather a large sample of tourists at Shanghai Disneyland, a recently opened and already popular international tourism attraction. Structural equation modeling was used to test for direct and moderated relationships.

Findings

The findings indicated that positive and negative C2C interactions have significant though differential impacts on customer responses. Furthermore, it was found that visitor arousal mediated the relationship between service quality and brand loyalty. Prior experience was identified as a moderator in the co-creation and co-destruction process during service encounters.

Practical implications

This paper is one of the first to examine the concept of co-destruction in the tourism and hospitality context. It contributes to the literature by demonstrating the merits of proactive service provision by tourism operators, taking account of both the co-creation and co-destruction of value.

Originality/value

The study extends the literature by taking account of both positive and negative C2C interactions when examining co-creation and co-destruction in the context of service encounters. It also contributes to knowledge by assessing the asymmetry of such interactions in the context of the customer experience.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 November 2019

Mehmet Ali Koseoglu, Issaka Lawerh Tetteh and Brian King

The purpose of this paper is to provide an extensive analysis of contributions to scholarly research on decision tools.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an extensive analysis of contributions to scholarly research on decision tools.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review was used to collect data from 47 articles published in peer-reviewed academic journals between 1980 and 2017. Co-citation analysis was adopted to analyse recent trends in research on decision tools and recommend a framework that places such research into three categories: mature, intermediate and nascent.

Findings

The research revealed that a majority of the studies on decision tools describe decision tool implementation in a single company or setting. It also provided a clear presentation of recent trends in the decision tools literature by categorising and comparing papers according to various salient features. The study of decision tools is classified into four macro clusters: conceptualising and defining decision tools; exploring the implementation of decision tools; understanding the relationship between decision tools and other disciplines/approaches/initiatives; and discovering the outcomes of decision tools. Furthermore, the framework proposed in this paper will help scholars identify issues that merit additional theory-building and/or theory-testing research.

Originality/value

To the authors’ awareness, this is the first paper to have adopted both a systematic literature review and co-citation analysis to identify the dominant trends and significant gaps in the field of decision tools research.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Mehmet Ali Koseoglu, Brian King and Roya Rahimi

This paper aims to explore gender disparities in the production of tourism knowledge with particular reference to academic journals.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore gender disparities in the production of tourism knowledge with particular reference to academic journals.

Design/methodology/approach

Authorship and co-authorship analyses were conducted of data extracted from articles and research notes published between 1965 and 2016 in 25 hospitality and tourism journals.

Findings

Gender imbalances are evident in the production of knowledge, though the disparities appear to be decreasing. While heterophilic research collaborations (those between men and women) show some evidence of higher productivity, homophilic collaborations (between males) have greater impact. The findings highlight gender imbalances in international collaborations, in SSCI listed journals, in first authoring and by country. There is evidence of higher collaborative levels among male authors and the differences have increased over time. The positioning of men and women within tourism scholarly networks shows no marked differences.

Practical implications

This data-driven analysis provides decision makers and policymakers with evidence to support well-targeted programs that advance female contributions in hospitality and tourism research collaborations. For example, senior academics and University administrators might offer support for female researchers to become more actively involved in hospitality and tourism research groups and projects. Universities or schools might also seek to encourage collaborations between male and female researchers in their performance indicators.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to examine gender disparities and positioning in collaborative hospitality and tourism research.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Hsin-Hui“Sunny” Hu, Hsin-Yi Hu and Brian King

The study aimed to investigate the impact of customer misbehaviors on airline in-flight customer contact personnel. A theoretical framework was proposed to test the…

2387

Abstract

Purpose

The study aimed to investigate the impact of customer misbehaviors on airline in-flight customer contact personnel. A theoretical framework was proposed to test the meditating role of role stress and emotional labor in the relationship between consumer misbehaviors and emotional exhaustion.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 336 cabin crew members employed by international airline companies participated in the study. The hypothesized model was tested using structural equation modeling with AMOS 20.0.

Findings

The results provide evidence that customer misbehaviors relate positively to employee role stress, emotional labor and emotional exhaustion. Moreover, role stress and emotional labor play important roles in enhancing the impacts of customer misbehaviors and thereby influence employee emotional exhaustion.

Practical implications

The findings potentially impact on employers both within and beyond the airline industry by demonstrating how frontline employees can be provided with support to reduce stress or exhaustion, leading ultimately to increased satisfaction.

Originality/value

This study has provided deeper theoretical insights into customer misbehaviors and their effects on employee role stress, emotional labor and emotional exhaustion.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

A.V. Seaton

This paper provides an overview of the visiting friends and relatives category in international tourism researchover the last decade. It was delivered as a keynote paper…

Abstract

This paper provides an overview of the visiting friends and relatives category in international tourism researchover the last decade. It was delivered as a keynote paper at the international conference, “VFR Tourism: Issues and implications” held at the Victoria University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia, in October 1996.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 52 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000