Search results

1 – 10 of 538
Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

James C. Sarros, Brian K. Cooper and Joseph C. Santora

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships among leadership vision, organizational culture, and support for innovation in not‐for‐profit (NFP) and FP…

14943

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships among leadership vision, organizational culture, and support for innovation in not‐for‐profit (NFP) and FP organizations. It hypothesizes that in NFPs, a socially responsible cultural orientation mediates the relationship between leadership vision and organizational support for innovation, whereas in FPs, a competitive cultural orientation mediates this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an empirical study that draws upon a large survey of 1,448 managers and senior executives who are members of the Australian Institute of Management.

Findings

Path analytic modelling provides partial support for the hypotheses. Although the predicted mediation effects occurred in NFPs and FPs, the strength of relationship between leadership vision and the two dimensions of organizational culture did not differ between the sectors. This was despite the observation that NFPs scored higher on a socially responsible cultural orientation than FPs, whereas FPs scored higher on a competitive cultural orientation.

Practical implications

Strategies for building innovative and sustainable organizations in the NFP sector are discussed on the basis of these findings.

Originality/value

The paper describes the first study in Australia that compares the responses of NFP and FP managers on leadership and related constructs, and provides evidence of the impact of organizational culture on leadership and innovation in these two sectors.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

James C. Sarros, Brian K. Cooper and Anne M. Hartican

The purpose of this paper is to examine self‐assessed character among Australian managers in relation to selected demographic variables of these managers, and to establish…

15571

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine self‐assessed character among Australian managers in relation to selected demographic variables of these managers, and to establish the initial psychometric properties of the Virtuous Leadership Scale used to measure dimensions of character.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a national online survey of managers utilizing the membership base of the Australian Institute of Management.

Findings

The findings reveal that self‐assessed character is multifaceted and varies across specific demographics (gender, age, level of seniority, years as an executive), and is subject to some degree of social desirability bias. Further research is warranted to explore these outcomes and relationships.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited by national culture and management self‐report data that need verification across different national cultures, work settings, and work groups. The findings indicate that integrity is a key character attribute reported by managers, but the present results require further validation across industry sectors and other organizational contexts.

Practical implications

The findings suggest the need for further examination of character as an important component of leadership success, strategy, and impact.

Originality/value

The study identifies attributes of character linked to selected demographic (personal and professional) variables of practising managers, and points the way for further examination of the part character has to play in the leadership of organizations.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Cathy Sheehan and Brian K. Cooper

The aims of this paper are, first, to consider the impact of organisational size and the strategic involvement of the human resource management (HRM) function on the…

11855

Abstract

Purpose

The aims of this paper are, first, to consider the impact of organisational size and the strategic involvement of the human resource management (HRM) function on the decision to outsource, second, to consider the impact of HRM outsourcing on organisational performance for organisations of different size and where the HRM function has access to positions of elevated political power.

Design/methodology/approach

The research examines responses from 441 Australian senior HRM managers who participated in an online survey of a national HRM professional association. The hypotheses were tested using multiple regression.

Findings

Although results did not confirm the expected relationship between smaller organisational size and increased outsourcing, there was a positive relationship between HRM strategic involvement and the decision to outsource. The relationship between HRM outsourcing and perceived financial performance was positive for smaller firms and negative for larger firms. The positive relationship between strategic HR involvement and organisational effectiveness was also enhanced when HRM activities were kept in‐house rather than when they were outsourced.

Research limitations/implications

Overall, the research findings confirm advantages for smaller firms that seek out external HRM assistance. The results of the study also indicate that there are organisational benefits when an elevated strategic HRM role in an organisation is combined with the decision to develop in‐house HRM activities rather than externalise these responsibilities.

Originality/value

Using political influence theory, the research applies an alternative theoretical perspective to the analysis of HRM outsourcing.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 40 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1985

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III…

12069

Abstract

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III, contains features to help the reader to retrieve relevant literature from MCB University Press' considerable output. Each entry within has been indexed according to author(s) and the Fifth Edition of the SCIMP/SCAMP Thesaurus. The latter thus provides a full subject index to facilitate rapid retrieval. Each article or book is assigned its own unique number and this is used in both the subject and author index. This Volume indexes 29 journals indicating the depth, coverage and expansion of MCB's portfolio.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2021

Shahid Khan, Kohyar Kiazad, Sen Sendjaya and Brian Cooper

Abusive supervision climate (ASC) affects not only direct subordinates of abusive supervisors but also their colleagues who work in the same group. Therefore, this study…

Abstract

Purpose

Abusive supervision climate (ASC) affects not only direct subordinates of abusive supervisors but also their colleagues who work in the same group. Therefore, this study aims to examine the underlying processes and boundary conditions of ASC's effects on group members' behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The study collected data from 213 employees in 51 workgroups across 13 organizations in Pakistan. Data were analyzed in MPlus version 8 (Muthén and Muthén, 1998–2017) using a random intercepts multilevel model. The authors followed the procedures for testing 2-1-1 mediation with a participant-level mediator as outlined in Pituch and Stapleton (2012).

Findings

The results revealed that anger mediated the negative relationship between ASC and group members' organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs), as well as the positive relationship between ASC and group members' withdrawal. In addition, agreeableness moderated the effect of group members' anger on OCBs, such that the relationship was stronger for more agreeable group members.

Originality/value

The findings contribute to the abusive supervision literature by elucidating anger as one mechanism through which ASC affects group members and by incorporating personality differences to better understand group members' behavioral responses.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

14758

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1972

BRIAN COOPER, until recently in Zambia for the Ministry of Overseas Development, setting up library facilities in a new teacher‐training college, has been appointed as the…

Abstract

BRIAN COOPER, until recently in Zambia for the Ministry of Overseas Development, setting up library facilities in a new teacher‐training college, has been appointed as the first ever hospital librarian at Rampton special hospital. The appointment is made jointly by Nottinghamshire County Library (K A Stockham is County Librarian) and the Department of Health and Social Security, and is a consequence of the recent government white paper on Libraries in hospitals.

Details

New Library World, vol. 73 no. 16
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2019

Helen De Cieri, Cathy Sheehan, Ross Donohue, Tracey Shea and Brian Cooper

The purpose of this paper is to apply the concept of power imbalance to explain workplace and demographic characteristics associated with bullying by different…

3071

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply the concept of power imbalance to explain workplace and demographic characteristics associated with bullying by different perpetrators in the healthcare sector.

Design/methodology/approach

All 69,927 members of the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation (Victoria) were invited to participate in an online survey in 2014; 4,891 responses were received (7 per cent response rate). Participants were asked about their exposure to workplace bullying (WPB) by different perpetrators. The questionnaire addressed demographic characteristics and perceptions of workplace characteristics (workplace type, leading indicators of occupational health and safety (OHS), prioritisation of OHS, supervisor support for safety and bureaucracy). Analysis involved descriptive statistics and regression analyses.

Findings

The study found that the exposure of nurses and health workers to bullying is relatively high (with 42 per cent of respondents experiencing WPB in the past 12 months) and there are multiple perpetrators of bullying. The research revealed several demographic predictors associated with the different types of perpetrators. Downward and horizontal bullying were the most prevalent forms. Workplace characteristics were more important predictors of bullying by different perpetrators than were demographic characteristics.

Research limitations/implications

There are limitations to the study due to a low response rate and the cross-sectional survey.

Practical implications

Practical implications of this study emphasise the importance of focussed human resource strategies to prevent bullying.

Originality/value

The key contribution of this research is to draw from theoretical explanations of power to inform understanding of the differences between perpetrators of bullying. The study highlights the workplace characteristics that influence bullying.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Brian Healy, Michele O’Dwyer and Ann Ledwith

Product advantage is consistently identified as the most important product characteristic in explaining the adoption and success of a new product. In small- and…

Abstract

Purpose

Product advantage is consistently identified as the most important product characteristic in explaining the adoption and success of a new product. In small- and medium-size enterprises (SMEs), in particular, improving new product performance is critical in supporting SME survival and growth. Given that SMEs are a vital component of most economies improving their ability to effectively launch new products is an essential activity for sustainability. However, although literature illustrates that developing products with high levels of product advantage and new product development is advantageous, few studies have explored product advantage activities in SMEs and consequently research on product advantage is over-reliant on large firm studies. Given the specific resource constraints which challenge SME new product development (i.e. financial, expertise, access to networks etc.) context-specific research is critical. The purpose of this paper is to address these gaps in literature by exploring the product advantage activities in four manufacturing SMEs actively engaged in product development.

Design/methodology/approach

The research question centres on exploring the antecedents of product advantage in SMEs (market uncertainties, competitive intensity, resource uncertainties and technological uncertainties) in the context of multi-dimensional perspective of product advantage (consisting of product innovativeness, product superiority and product meaningfulness). A qualitative interpretivist approach was used to explore the research question exploring the antecedents to, and nature of, product advantage in SMEs. Case studies were used to inductively and holistically view SMEs in their entirety, this approach facilitated in-depth understanding of the reality of the SME and allowed for the interpretation of the SMEs owner/managers perspectives on product advantage.

Findings

The empirical findings suggest that the most significant antecedent of product advantage in the case SMEs was competitive intensity followed by technology uncertainty and resource uncertainty and then market uncertainty. Product advantage was found to be strongly based on product meaningfulness with elements of product innovativeness and product superiority also defining their perspective of product advantage.

Research limitations/implications

There are several implications for SME owner/managers arising from this study. In the context of these findings, SMEs need to carefully consider three issues in supporting their new product development: first, their dependence on letting existing customers drives their new product development; second, owner/manager perceptions of product advantage are focused on delivering guaranteed sales, this focus nurtures incremental continuous product development rather than radical discontinuous innovation. While this strategy is low risk and supports SME sustainability, it could lead to less ambitious innovation strategies and slower growth for SMEs; third, antecedents of product advantage such as competitive intensity, technology uncertainty and resource uncertainty and market uncertainty need to carefully managed.

Originality/value

This study illustrates the complex nature of the antecedents and nature of product advantage in SMEs. The study provides insight into the product advantage characteristics that SMEs consider important in the development of new products. Different elements of each of the three product advantage constructs (product meaningfulness, product superiority and customer meaningfulness) are considered important under different conditions. Throughout this analysis, market needs and wants, technology, competitors and resources emerged as the defining conditions upon which product advantage decisions are based. More specifically knowledge regarding the market, technology, competition and the availability of resources dictated the type and levels of advantages that were presented in new products.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 May 2022

Daniel Prajogo, Carlos Mena, Brian Cooper and Pei-Lee Teh

This study investigates the role of national culture on the implementation and effectiveness of quality management practices. Specifically, the authors examine the dual…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the role of national culture on the implementation and effectiveness of quality management practices. Specifically, the authors examine the dual roles of two of Hofstede's national culture dimensions (individualism and indulgence) in driving the implementation of people management practices and in moderating the relationship between people management and product quality performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors’ dataset combines a survey of 976 firms from 22 countries with Hofstede's national culture index. A multi-level analysis, at firm and country levels, is used for investigating the interplay between two dimensions of national culture (individualism and indulgence) on people management practices and product quality performance.

Findings

The authors' findings show the negative relationship between indulgence (at country level) and people management practices (at firm level) while individualism (at country level) strengthens the relationship between people management and product quality performance (at firm level). Furthermore, the finding shows that the joint interaction between individualism and indulgence (at country level) moderates the relationship between people management and product quality performance (at firm level) where the relationship is strongest when individualism is high and indulgence is low.

Practical implications

Understanding the interplay between national culture and management practices is important for managers in making decisions on the practices managers should implement under different cultural contexts to gain the expected outcomes.

Originality/value

The authors' results challenge the universalist view that suggests that quality management practices (in this case people management practices) can be applied in any context effectively to achieve high product quality performance by showing that facets of national culture influence the implementation and effectiveness of people management practices and performance. The results also provide a fresh perspective on the role of indulgence, given that it is the newest dimension in Hofstede's framework. The authors also extend previous studies which commonly only examine the main and not interactive effects of different dimensions of national culture.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 42 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

1 – 10 of 538