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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

Beth Davis-Sramek, Rafay Ishfaq, Brian J. Gibson and Cliff Defee

The purpose of this research is to provide a theoretical explanation of the strategic and structural changes occurring in US omnichannel retail supply chains. Using…

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1357

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to provide a theoretical explanation of the strategic and structural changes occurring in US omnichannel retail supply chains. Using longitudinal data, the research documents transitions in retailers' supply chain strategies, specifically related to the order fulfillment process. It further offers explanation for how and why these transitions occurred.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a process theory lens to explain the business model transformation of the omnichannel order fulfillment process. Using a case study approach, a longitudinal multicase study was conducted with six large US retailers over a span of 10 years. Within-case and cross-case analysis identifies the sequence and rationale of different strategic and structural shifts in retailers' omnichannel order fulfillment strategy.

Findings

The within- and cross-case analyses offer insight into how the transitions occur, at what rate they occur across several different retailers, and why the rate can differ across the stages of omnichannel transition among retailers. The research documents that retailers took varied approaches to strategically develop and structurally change their order fulfillment processes in their transition to omnichannel retail. The findings reveal that these approaches are dependent on retailers' store-based logistics capabilities and specific supply chain arrangements within their retail segment.

Research limitations/implications

The longitudinal and theoretically driven approach provides researchers a better understanding of the business model transformation in US retail omnichannel operations. This approach builds theoretical context around why and how strategic and structural changes in omnichannel fulfillment occurred over time. It also explains the underlying omnichannel phenomenon more accurately than research focused on discrete changes at a single point in time.

Practical implications

The findings and managerial insights can assist practitioners in understanding how environmental changes have led to strategic and structural shifts across different stages of omnichannel fulfillment evolution. These insights also provide guidance to retailers that are currently in early stages of developing their omnichannel fulfillment strategy.

Originality/value

Logistics and fulfillment operations of retailers have changed dramatically over the last 10–15 years. The authors apply a process theory lens to explain how and why retailers have integrated their channels to achieve omnichannel success at the store level.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2009

David A. Menachof, Brian J. Gibson, Joe B. Hanna and Anthony E. Whiteing

The purpose of this paper is to provide rankings of quality of peer reviewed periodicals for faculty research use, rankings of usefuless of both peer reviewed and non‐peer…

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3050

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide rankings of quality of peer reviewed periodicals for faculty research use, rankings of usefuless of both peer reviewed and non‐peer reviewed periodicals for teaching and outreach purposes, and rankings of usefulness of search engines for finding articles.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted during the Autumn Semester of 2006. 82 periodicals were identified as relevant to the Supply Chain Management field. Respondents were asked to rank their top used journals in terms of use for teaching, outreach and research.

Findings

A total of 143 surveys were completed. Journal of Business Logistics, Harvard Business Review, and International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management were the top three ranked journals in the composite index. EBSCO Business Source Premier, ProQuest, and Google Scholar were the top three search engines used to find logistics and SCM articles.

Research limitations/implications

A clear global consensus is forming on the top journals for SCM. However, the emergence of Operations Management/Operations Research Journals into the rankings is an important trend. There was also the absence of previously ranked journals as the field evolved from transportation and distribution to logistics to SCM.

Originality/value

This paper is the largest survey completed to date in the field and substantially updates previous surveys. All academics who are active in SCM will find value in this paper.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

Brian J. Gibson and Robert Lorin Cook

Successful job placement of logistics graduates is highly beneficial to organizations offering logistics positions as well as to university logistics programs. A critical…

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1638

Abstract

Successful job placement of logistics graduates is highly beneficial to organizations offering logistics positions as well as to university logistics programs. A critical aspect of successful job placement involves understanding the preferences and perceptions of both students and employers regarding logistics positions. In this paper, we report the results of surveys of U.S. undergraduate logistics student and employer preferences and perceptions regarding logistics positions. The research results provide employers and logistics educators with information that can be used to improve job placement success.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Sean P. Goffnett, Robert L. Cook, Zachary Williams and Brian J. Gibson

Career shifts and talent shortages in supply chain management (SCM) are evident at most occupation levels and need further attention and understanding. The purpose of this…

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1855

Abstract

Purpose

Career shifts and talent shortages in supply chain management (SCM) are evident at most occupation levels and need further attention and understanding. The purpose of this paper is to present factors that shape SCM career expectations, choices, and satisfaction and to advance career theory and research that is currently absent in SCM literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This study administered open‐ended surveys to individuals educated and working in SCM to elicit the satisfaction and dissatisfaction that professionals derive from various aspects of their SCM careers. Resulting data were content analyzed and categorized into major themes representing career satisfiers (likes) and dissatisfiers (dislikes).

Findings

This exploratory study found evidence of traditional career components and the presences of objective and subjective components that transcend organizational boundaries. The results indicate an emergence of the boundaryless career concept in SCM, as the SCM career appears less dependent on a single employer. From the data emerged six major career satisfiers and seven major career dissatisfiers. Challenge is the most satisfying aspect of a SCM career. Challenge, however, may have limits, as the most dissatisfying aspect of a SCM career is the overload that can overwhelm a SCM professional in his or her career.

Practical implications

Career satisfaction can be readily measured and categorized to explain SCM career expectations and choices that may lead to positive or negative work outcomes. Supply chain managers could utilize the information to understand employee perceptions and behaviors that may influence performance and to contend with disruptive career shifts and looming talent shortages in SCM.

Originality/value

This paper introduces contemporary career theory concepts and is a first of its kind in the field that explores attitudes and perceptions toward careers in SCM, as it focuses on career satisfiers and dissatisfiers described by SCM professionals.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

Christopher W. Craighead, Joe B. Hanna, Brian J. Gibson and Jack R. Meredith

The purpose of this research is to track the evolution of logistics research with a focus on the methods and orientation of the research from the past to the present…

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3348

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to track the evolution of logistics research with a focus on the methods and orientation of the research from the past to the present. Specifically, this paper investigates the evolution of logistics research methodologies in an attempt to address previous calls for a paradigm discussion aimed at assessing the current direction and proposing a future direction for research in the logistics discipline.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors chose a previously established framework which describes and evaluates alternative research paradigms. A content analysis of articles in selected journals allows published research of the logistics discipline to be evaluated and categorized. The categorization process uses a two‐dimensional framework which then allows the authors to classify research into cells in a matrix which represent a variety of research paradigms.

Findings

The results illustrate that the methodologies employed in logistics have evolved during the period of analysis. The logistics discipline appears to focus on survey‐based research in an attempt to examine attitudinal and behavioral aspects of logistics interactions. Significant amounts of research are also conducted with simulation and mathematical modeling while case study and action research methods comprise a relatively small but growing portion of published logistics research. Nevertheless, the results of the research support the conclusion that the logistics discipline is diversifying its research efforts and expanding the array of issues addressed.

Research limitations/implications

The results are based on a thorough literature review along with the use of well established research frameworks and methodologies. Nevertheless, the research focuses on analyzing the content of logistics discipline research in specific outlets and during specific periods of time. Therefore, while the authors believe the results provide a useful guide for assessing the evolution of research in the discipline, it is not all‐inclusive in nature.

Practical implications

Based on our research results in general logistics, researchers appear to be responding to the evolution of the discipline by expanding their efforts to conduct applied research. It appears that common interests are being identified and in many cases, academicians and practitioners are working together to build an alliance designed to benefit the discipline by building on the strengths of each group.

Originality/value

Research plays an important role in furthering any discipline by enhancing our understanding of issues pertinent to those studying and practicing the discipline. This paper helps academicians and practitioners of the logistics discipline to better understand the direction of the profession and to assist us in shaping the future of the discipline.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Brian J. Gibson, Stephen M. Rutner and Scott B. Keller

Over the past decade, there have been a number of studies that examined either shipper or carrier selection and evaluation factors. However, there has been little…

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2326

Abstract

Over the past decade, there have been a number of studies that examined either shipper or carrier selection and evaluation factors. However, there has been little comparison between how these two groups perceive these factors with regard to their partners. This study examines the similarities and differences with the rankings of factors between shipper and carrier groups. Furthermore, the results highlight the various levels of satisfaction between the two groups.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

Wesley S. Randall, Brian J. Gibson, C. Clifford Defee and Brent D. Williams

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the unique supply chain strategies employed by retailers.

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7228

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the unique supply chain strategies employed by retailers.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods approach was employed involving analysis of depth interviews with 27 retail supply chain executives combined with a follow‐up survey capturing over 200 responses.

Findings

In light of uncertain economic conditions, retailers appear to be developing more agile/responsive supply chain management (SCM) strategies. Additionally, retailers are putting greater emphasis on maintaining a balance of cost versus service than the cost‐centered focus found in a prior study.

Research limitations/implications

This study focused on US retailers and therefore results should be cautiously extended to the retailing environment in other countries.

Practical implications

Retailing is not a “one size fits all” business, and study results suggest the SCM strategies used by retailers depend greatly on the nature of each retailer's model. However, the need to create agile SCM processes while controlling costs was an overarching theme described by retailers.

Originality/value

Retailers operate some of the largest and most complex supply chains, yet SCM research has generally overlooked the retail sector. This study targets this gap, and in addition introduces a novel data collection approach using clicker devices that researchers may find useful in future projects.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Rafay Ishfaq, C. Clifford Defee, Brian J Gibson and Uzma Raja

The purpose of this paper is to identify the realignment of the physical distribution process for store-based retailers in their efforts to integrate the online channel…

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7114

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the realignment of the physical distribution process for store-based retailers in their efforts to integrate the online channel into their business model. Multiple attributes of the physical distribution process are evaluated to identify associations with order fulfillment methods adopted by omni-channel retailers.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-method approach is used which includes qualitative evaluation of 50 interviews of supply chain executives from large retailers. Additionally, secondary data about firm size, store and distribution networks, online sales, distribution configuration, and order delivery options are used. The findings of qualitative analysis are incorporated into a quantitative classification-tree analysis to identify associations among distribution attributes, order fulfillment methods and order delivery services.

Findings

Retailers are developing a consistent omni-channel physical distribution process in which stores undertake a bigger role in order fulfillment and delivery. Level of online sales, size of distribution network, number of sales associates at a store, and number of years engaged in the online channel are identified as having strong associations with the type of order fulfillment method used by omni-channel retailers. The study finds that retailers are focussed on integrating their store and DC inventories and have the benefit of scale with a large store network.

Practical implications

Retailers are reconfiguring their physical distribution processes in the complex omni-channel environment can use the findings of this study to evaluate their strategy and identify the level of realignment effort that is needed. A better understanding of the requirements of physical distribution in an omni-channel setting will guide retailers in developing requisite operational capabilities.

Originality/value

This paper provides a first in-depth look at order fulfillment choices in omni-channel retail and identifies efforts that are underway to realign key elements of the physical distribution process.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 46 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Harry L. Sink, C. John Langley and Brian J. Gibson

Outsourcing of logistics has become a key element of corporate strategy in a growing number of firms. For a variety of reasons, the market for these services is expanding…

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4634

Abstract

Outsourcing of logistics has become a key element of corporate strategy in a growing number of firms. For a variety of reasons, the market for these services is expanding rapidly. Represents the first phase of a triangulated research design formulated to investigate empirically the buying and selling of third‐party logistics services in the USA. A focus group, composed of senior managers personally involved in the evaluation and/or purchase of third‐party logistics services, was convened to explore buyer attitudes and generate concepts related to the contract logistics market. The study investigated the definition of third‐party logistics from the buyer’s perspective, the pros and cons of contract logistics, the necessary attributes of services and suppliers, the impetus for logistics outsourcing and the methods employed to select suppliers. Findings from the research are presented as five propositions.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Brian J. Gibson and Robert Lorin Cook

Reports the results of a survey of 41 US third‐party logistics (3PL) firm practices for hiring entry‐level managers. Reveals the recruiting, selection, and compensation…

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2838

Abstract

Reports the results of a survey of 41 US third‐party logistics (3PL) firm practices for hiring entry‐level managers. Reveals the recruiting, selection, and compensation methods used for 96 different positions and related compensation data (e.g. mean starting salary = US$34,358). Recommends that 3PL firms use the information to benchmark current practices and offers specific ideas to improve recruiting effectiveness. Also proposes research results‐driven job search strategies for individuals seeking positions with 3PL firms.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 31 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

1 – 10 of 232