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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Brian Fitzgerald

Introducing Management Development Centres enabled Atkins to map its employees’ potential career routes by assessing their key capabilities and interests, explains Brian

Abstract

Introducing Management Development Centres enabled Atkins to map its employees’ potential career routes by assessing their key capabilities and interests, explains Brian Fitzgerald, Akins’ director of HR development.

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Strategic HR Review, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Brian Fitzgerald

Presents two fundamental arguments. First, it is proposed that most of the currently available systems development methodologies are founded on concepts which emerged in…

Abstract

Presents two fundamental arguments. First, it is proposed that most of the currently available systems development methodologies are founded on concepts which emerged in the period from about 1967 to 1977. This argument is presented through the use of literature references. The second argument is that the profile of the development environment now faced in organizations is very different from that which prevailed in the period 1967 to 1977. This is illustrated through original empirical research which supports this argument, and by contrasting these findings with those of previous studies in the literature. It is therefore argued that there is a need to update “tenses” by deriving new methodological canons more appropriate to the needs of the current development environment. Some suggestions for new methodological canons appropriate to the current development environment are provided.

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Information Technology & People, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Brian Fitzgerald

Reports on Management Round table′s conference on “Masscustomization – at a profit: any variety, any time,anywhere”, which attempted to explain the implications of…

Abstract

Reports on Management Round table′s conference on “Mass customization – at a profit: any variety, any time, anywhere”, which attempted to explain the implications of mass customization and how companies are utilizing it to satisfy customers. Provides a summary of the methods, ideas and conclusions from the conference, giving ideas from Joseph Pine and Stan Davis on responding to the customer; outlines a report from IBM′s senior director of product design, explaining how IBM used creative imagination in engineering to customize PCs for its consumers. Concludes that mass customization will define leading organizations in the next century, along with rapid turnover from customer specification to actual product.

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World Class Design to Manufacture, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-3074

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Gregg Tong and Brian Fitzgerald

Presents samples of ideas and examples of concurrent engineeringdiscussed at Management Roundtable′s Seventh International Conference onDesign for Manufacturability, held…

Abstract

Presents samples of ideas and examples of concurrent engineering discussed at Management Roundtable′s Seventh International Conference on Design for Manufacturability, held in Orlando, Florida, USA.

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World Class Design to Manufacture, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-3074

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

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Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1946

THE Librarian faces one of the turning times in library history. The flow of progress has not yet begun, the shortages and consequent imperious demands for food, housing…

Abstract

THE Librarian faces one of the turning times in library history. The flow of progress has not yet begun, the shortages and consequent imperious demands for food, housing and clothing stand in the way of the beginning, except on paper. How long the interregnum will last none can say. The authorities, which are a reflection in some ways of the Parliamentary party in power, are well‐disposed towards libraries; the official handbook of the Labour Party proves that; but the clamour of the needs we have mentioned deafens everybody to library needs—except in certain instances. For example, the rebuilding and enlarging of the staff at Holborn is an encouraging sign. Of more potential significance is the working out of the so‐called National Charter. It has involved many towns in the task of creating an establishment for each public department. Thus, in one library system we hear that each branch or department may claim a librarian and a deputy both on the A.P.T. scale, but all the assistants are either general or clerical. Some assistants we hear have applied to be of clerical grade as the maximum salary is greater than in the general. This we suggest is putting cash before status because it is accepted as an axiom that a clerk has only clerical qualifications and potentialities, while a general assistant may aspire, when there is a vacancy and if he have certificates, to the professional status. The grading in the particular library mentioned has rather a petrifying effect in that no assistant can get into the professional grade unless his librarian or deputy departs. Possibly this sort of thing may alter, but the fact remains for good or ill—it is not all ill by any means—that no library is able to attract men from another except to a definitely higher post.

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New Library World, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1963

SINCE the year 1940, there have appeared two major reports on the Public Library system in Great Britain. The first, “The public library system of Great Britain: a report…

Abstract

SINCE the year 1940, there have appeared two major reports on the Public Library system in Great Britain. The first, “The public library system of Great Britain: a report on its present condition, with proposals for post‐war re‐organisation” by Lionel R. McColvin, appeared in 1942. It suggested sweeping changes in the organisation of the public library system, more radical and far‐reaching than those embodied in the recent recommendations of the Library Association for local government reform. On library co‐operation, the report was equally radical, though certain similarities with the recommendations of the second report are apparent.

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New Library World, vol. 65 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Information Technology & People, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1956

THERE are so many major questions before the library profession that librarians are naturally curious about the manner and matter of the Annual Conference. And critical…

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THERE are so many major questions before the library profession that librarians are naturally curious about the manner and matter of the Annual Conference. And critical too; we do not say justifiably; but it is the one general assembly in the year where a consensus of opinion ought to be possible. The business meeting itself is usually quite unsuitable as a gauge of opinion. That the Southport one seemed to demonstrate. We have advocated in these pages that the Library Association Council should base most of the Conference on its own determined policies and not fritter away invaluable hours on long papers which, interesting as they can be made, add very little year by year towards progress in our aims and objects.

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New Library World, vol. 57 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1965

THE Newcastle school, like most others, was established after the second world war to provide full‐time education in librarianship as an alternative to the part‐time…

Abstract

THE Newcastle school, like most others, was established after the second world war to provide full‐time education in librarianship as an alternative to the part‐time system which until 1946 was the only one available to the majority of librarians. At first most of the students were returning servicemen whose library careers had been interrupted by the war and they were followed by students direct from libraries, universities and schools. From a handful of students and one full‐time member of staff in the first year the school has grown steadily until there were 53 students and five staff during the session 1962–3 which was the last course held for the Registration Examination.

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New Library World, vol. 67 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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