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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

David O. Williams and Brian E. Carpenter

Spectacular developments in computer network technology and applications are imminent, but European research and industry are unprepared for them. The gigabit testbeds and…

Abstract

Spectacular developments in computer network technology and applications are imminent, but European research and industry are unprepared for them. The gigabit testbeds and the NREN plans in the United States and technology developments in Japan are a clear challenge. Europehas a complex pattern of national and international research networks that provide valuableservices for their existing users. The evolution of these networks has been hindered by a variety of regulatory, political, economic, and technical barriers to progress, especially the lack of political focus and the small scale of industrial involvement. This paper analyzes the situation and makes recommendations for the way forward.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2019

Surma Mukhopadhyay, Ramsankar Basak, Darrell Carpenter and Brian J. Reithel

Little is known about factors that affect patient use of online medical records (OMR). Specifically, with rising vulnerability concerns associated with security and…

Abstract

Purpose

Little is known about factors that affect patient use of online medical records (OMR). Specifically, with rising vulnerability concerns associated with security and privacy breaches, patient use of OMR requires further attention. This paper aims to investigate patient use of OMR. Using the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), factors affecting continued use of OMR were examined.

Design/methodology/approach

The Health Information National Trends Survey 5 (HINTS 5), Cycle 1 data were used. This is an ongoing nation-wide survey sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) of the USA. The subjects were 31-74 years old with access to the Internet. Descriptive information was projected to the US population.

Findings

In total, 765 respondents representing 48.7 million members of the US population were analyzed. Weighted regression results showed significant effects of perceived usefulness, visit frequency and provider encouragement on continued use of OMR while vulnerability perception was not significant. Moderating effects of these variables were also noted. Perceived usefulness and provider encouragement emerged as important predictors.

Practical implications

Insights may help design interventions by health-care providers and policymakers.

Social implications

Insights should help patient empowerment and developers with designing systems.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine health-care consumers’ continued use of OMR using nationally representative data and real-world patients, many of who have one or more chronic diseases (e.g. diabetes, hypertension, asthma) or are cancer survivors. Results highlight factors helping or hindering continuing OMR use. As such, insights should help identify opportunities to increase the extent of use, project future OMR usage patterns and spread the benefits of OMR, including bringing forth positive health outcomes.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1980

Not many weeks back, according to newspaper reports, three members of the library staff of the School of Slavonic and East European Studies in London were dismissed. All…

Abstract

Not many weeks back, according to newspaper reports, three members of the library staff of the School of Slavonic and East European Studies in London were dismissed. All had refused to carry out issue desk duty. All, according to the newspaper account, were members of ASTMS. None, according to the Library Association yearbook, was a member of the appropriate professional organisation for librarians in Great Britain.

Details

Library Review, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 3 November 2020

Mehrnoush Sarafan, Brian Squire and Emma Brandon–Jones

Past research has shown that culture has significant effects on people's evaluation of and responses to risk. Despite this important role, the supply chain risk literature…

Abstract

Purpose

Past research has shown that culture has significant effects on people's evaluation of and responses to risk. Despite this important role, the supply chain risk literature has been silent on this matter. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of cultural value orientations on managerial perception of and responses to a supply disruption risk.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct a scenario-based experiment to investigate the effect of cultural value orientations – i.e. individualism-collectivism and uncertainty avoidance – on individuals' perception of risk and supplier switching intention in the face of a supply disruption.

Findings

The findings highlight the negative effect of individualism-collectivism on disruption risk perception and switching intention in high uncertain circumstances. However, these relationships are non-significant in relatively less uncertain situations. Moreover, the findings show that the impact of uncertainty avoidance on risk perception and supplier switching is positive and significant in both low and high uncertain circumstances.

Originality/value

Extant research has traditionally assumed that when confronted with disruption risks, managers make decisions using an economic utility model, to best serve the long-term objectives of the firm. This paper draws from advances of behavioural research to show that cultural value orientations influence such decisions through a mediating mechanism of subjective risk perception.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

Abstract

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 54 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Brian B. Carpenter

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Michael A Hitt, Brian K Boyd and Dan Li

The field of strategic management has advanced substantially in both theory and empirical research over the last 25 years. However, there are “cracks” beginning to occur…

Abstract

The field of strategic management has advanced substantially in both theory and empirical research over the last 25 years. However, there are “cracks” beginning to occur in the methodology “dam.” To grow as a discipline, strategic management research must meet and deal effectively with methodological challenges in several areas. We address these challenges in each of the following areas: research questions, data collection, construct measurement, analysis of endogenous relationships, and applications. We present a concise view of the future suggesting ways in which these challenges can be overcome and explain the benefits to the field.

Details

Research Methodology in Strategy and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-235-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Through a survey of 200 employees working in five of the thirty establishments analysed in previous research about the microeconomic effects of reducing the working time…

Abstract

Through a survey of 200 employees working in five of the thirty establishments analysed in previous research about the microeconomic effects of reducing the working time (Cahier 25), the consequences on employees of such a reduction can be assessed; and relevant attitudes and aspirations better known.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Book part
Publication date: 15 January 2021

Russell Spiker, Lawrence Stacey and Corinne Reczek

Purpose: We review theory and research to suggest how research on sexual and gender minority (SGM) population health could more completely account for social class.…

Abstract

Purpose: We review theory and research to suggest how research on sexual and gender minority (SGM) population health could more completely account for social class.

Approach: First, we review theory on social class, gender, and sexuality, especially pertaining to health. Next, we review research on social class among SGM populations. Then, we review 42 studies of SGM population health that accounted for one or more components of social class. Finally, we suggest future directions for investigating social class as a fundamental driver of SGM health.

Findings: Social class and SGM stigma are both theorized as “fundamental causes” of health, yet most studies of SGM health do not rigorously theorize social class. A few studies control socioeconomic characteristics as mediators of SGM health disparities, but that approach obscures class disparities within SGM populations. Only two of 42 studies we reviewed examined SGM population health at the intersections of social class, gender, and sexuality.

Research implications: Researchers interested in SGM population health would benefit from explicitly stating their chosen theory and operationalization of social class. Techniques such as splitting samples by social class and statistical interactions can help illuminate how social class and SGM status intertwine to influence health.

Originality: We synthesize theory and research on social class, sexuality, and gender pertaining to health. In doing so, we hope to help future research more thoroughly account for social class as a factor shaping the lives and health of SGM people.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

BRIAN VICKERY and ALINA VICKERY

There is a huge amount of information and data stored in publicly available online databases that consist of large text files accessed by Boolean search techniques. It is…

Abstract

There is a huge amount of information and data stored in publicly available online databases that consist of large text files accessed by Boolean search techniques. It is widely held that less use is made of these databases than could or should be the case, and that one reason for this is that potential users find it difficult to identify which databases to search, to use the various command languages of the hosts and to construct the Boolean search statements required. This reasoning has stimulated a considerable amount of exploration and development work on the construction of search interfaces, to aid the inexperienced user to gain effective access to these databases. The aim of our paper is to review aspects of the design of such interfaces: to indicate the requirements that must be met if maximum aid is to be offered to the inexperienced searcher; to spell out the knowledge that must be incorporated in an interface if such aid is to be given; to describe some of the solutions that have been implemented in experimental and operational interfaces; and to discuss some of the problems encountered. The paper closes with an extensive bibliography of references relevant to online search aids, going well beyond the items explicitly mentioned in the text. An index to software appears after the bibliography at the end of the paper.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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