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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Mayoor Mohan, Fernando R. Jiménez, Brian P. Brown and Caley Cantrell

This paper aims to explore the relationship between brand functionality and consumer-based brand equity.

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2798

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the relationship between brand functionality and consumer-based brand equity.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods approach was adopted including a qualitative study and multiple survey-based studies. Mediation and moderated-mediation paths were tested using PROCESS and three-stage least squares simultaneous estimation models.

Findings

Study 1 finds that consumers perceive highly functional brands can enhance their self-competence to perform a task. This phenomenon is labelled brand skill and defined as the extent to which consumers perceive their own performance as emanating from their use of a particular brand. Study 2 finds that brand skill mediates the relationship between brand functionality, brand connection and consumer-based brand equity, while a post hoc study showed that these relationships are robust among private meaning brands. Study 3 demonstrates that these mediated relationships are moderated by the type of dominant benefit the brand provides (i.e. hedonic-versus utilitarian-dominant benefits).

Research limitations/implications

Based on self-determination theory, brand skill is posited as the link between brand functionality, brand connection and consumer-based brand equity.

Practical implications

Brand managers are urged to not overlook the role of brand functionality in favor of other non-functional brand dimensions. Brand functionality enhances consumers’ perceived self-competence and fosters brand connection, especially for brands that offer superior utilitarian benefits.

Originality/value

This is the first study that empirically examines the process by which brand functionality leads to consumer-based brand equity and the role brand skill plays in making that connection.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2020

Jonathan Coope, Andy Barrett, Brian Brown, Mark Crossley, Raghu Raghavan and Muthusamy Sivakami

The purpose of this paper is to provide a narrative review of the literature on mental health resilience and other positive mental health capacities of urban and internal migrants.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a narrative review of the literature on mental health resilience and other positive mental health capacities of urban and internal migrants.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology for this narrative review included a search of articles published up to 2017. The abstracts were screened and relevant articles studied and discussed. Literature on the particular mental health challenges of urban migrants in India was also studied. References found in the literature relating to neurourbanism were also followed up to explore broader historical and conceptual contexts.

Findings

Several key sources and resources for mental health resilience were identified – including familial and community networks and individual hope or optimism. Nevertheless, much of the literature tends to focus at the level of the individual person, even though ecological systems theory would suggest that mental health resilience is better understood as multi-layered, i.e. relevant to, and impacted by, communities and broader societal and environmental contexts.

Originality/value

This paper provides insight into an aspect of migrant mental health that has tended to be overlooked hitherto: the mental health resilience and positive mental health capacities of urban migrants. This is particularly relevant where professional “expert” mental health provision for internal migrant communities is absent or unaffordable. Previous work has tended to focus predominantly on mental health risk factors, despite growing awareness that focusing on risk factors along can lead to an over-reliance on top-down expert-led interventions and overlook positive capacities for mental health that are sometimes possessed by individuals and their communities.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2019

Jodie Ferguson, Brian Brown and D. Eric Boyd

The purpose of this paper is to consider corporate social irresponsibility (CSI) within the supply chain. The discussion focuses on the social component of social…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider corporate social irresponsibility (CSI) within the supply chain. The discussion focuses on the social component of social responsibility and explores its effects on end-users. Moreover, this paper presents moral intensity, a construct introduced in the ethics literature, as a potential guide to managers who struggle to navigate the gray area between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and CSI.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper conceptualizes CSI within the supply chain and offers a framework and propositions for understanding and preventing irresponsible behavior from a moral intensity perspective.

Findings

The moral intensity framework provides a normative approach with the potential to guide managers who face choices involving decisions that might lead to irresponsible behavior in interorganizational settings.

Originality/value

This paper draws attention to business-to-business CSI and the limited research that focuses on the social aspects of CSR, rather than the environmental and economic factors emphasized in prior research. It also introduces the moral intensity framework to the supply chain literature and highlights the end-user’s (i.e. consumer’s) role in influencing the performance of the overall value chain.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

A £750,000 paint plant has gone on stream at the Bisley plant of UK office furniture manufacturer, F. C. Brown. Brian Rooks went to see how robots are incorporated into the plant.

Abstract

A £750,000 paint plant has gone on stream at the Bisley plant of UK office furniture manufacturer, F. C. Brown. Brian Rooks went to see how robots are incorporated into the plant.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 3 November 2009

Paul Crawford and Brian Brown

This paper considers the demand for evidence‐based practice in mental health communication and describes how evidence from studies of health communication, as well as…

Abstract

This paper considers the demand for evidence‐based practice in mental health communication and describes how evidence from studies of health communication, as well as recommendations from educational models, professional bodies and policy directives have been incorporated into our ‘Brief, Ordinary and Effective’ model for communication in nursing. A key challenge in putting evidence to work in health care and bridging the theory‐practice gap concerns the social and organisational context that may not always work to sustain new initiatives. Accordingly, we will describe an attempt to support and consolidate awareness of the role of evidence in health care communication via a Managed Innovation Network and the development of the Brief, Ordinary and Effective model of health care communication. This enables us to align the quest for new knowledge and insights that are practice‐congruent with the kinds of applicability criteria that modern health care providers set out. This has yielded important insights about how research can be embedded in informed practice and how evidence‐based communicative practice can be nurtured and made viable in communication in mental health care.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Paul Crawford, Brian Brown and Pam Majomi

A study of the narratives of community mental health nurses, with an emphasis on education and training, identified education as offering a ‘stepping stone’ out of a…

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175

Abstract

A study of the narratives of community mental health nurses, with an emphasis on education and training, identified education as offering a ‘stepping stone’ out of a profession that struggles for recognition and status. This paper describes those narratives and the challenges facing healthcare organisations seeking to assimilate and retain the talent of those who have achieved academic success. The authors suggest that encouraging an expertise that integrates academic and practice skills might be achieved through more widespread appointment of clinical professorships.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Paul Crawford, Charley Baker and Brian Brown

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1043

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2010

Paul Crawford, Brian Brown, Victoria Tischler and Charley Baker

This discussion paper reviews and critiques literature related to the evolution of the medical humanities as an academic discipline and its contribution to healthcare…

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1153

Abstract

This discussion paper reviews and critiques literature related to the evolution of the medical humanities as an academic discipline and its contribution to healthcare provision. We argue that despite considerable advances in the field of medical humanities, needs have been identified for a more inclusive, outward‐facing and applied discipline. These needs can be met in the form of what we have called the health humanities, which both embrace interdisciplinarity and engage with the contributions of those marginalised from the medical humanities ‐ for example, allied health professionals, nurses, patients and carers. It is argued that there is a need for new thinking to develop the discipline of health humanities, to develop, provide and share research, expertise, training and education.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2013

Kunal Swani, George Milne and Brian P. Brown

This research aims to investigate the message strategies most likely to promote online “word-of-mouth” (WOM) activity for business-to-business (B2B)/business-to-consumer…

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8721

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to investigate the message strategies most likely to promote online “word-of-mouth” (WOM) activity for business-to-business (B2B)/business-to-consumer as well as product/service Facebook accounts.

Design/methodology/approach

Using content analysis and HLM, the authors measure the relationship between three types of message strategies and Facebook message “Likes” by analyzing 1,143 wall post messages of 193 Fortune 500 Facebook accounts.

Findings

Research findings suggest that B2B Facebook account posts are more effective if they include corporate brand names and avoid “hard sell” or explicitly commercial statements. Furthermore, results suggest that including emotional sentiments in Facebook posts is a particularly effective social media strategy for B2B and service marketers.

Originality/value

This study advances the knowledge of social media and online WOM behavior, as well as B2B and service advertising/communication literature, by relating message content to message popularity. In terms of managerial implications, this research provides explanations and support for the implementation of effective social media message strategies that are likely to promote WOM activity.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

Kathryn Brown and Brian H. Kleiner

“Welcome to the new world of banking, where the bank goes to the customer rather than waiting for the customer to come to the bank.”. Financial institutions are in the…

Abstract

“Welcome to the new world of banking, where the bank goes to the customer rather than waiting for the customer to come to the bank.”. Financial institutions are in the process of executing an unprecedented reconfiguration of the banking industry.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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