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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Brian Beal

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether authentic leadership in hospitality is composed of four distinctive but related substantive components (i.e…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether authentic leadership in hospitality is composed of four distinctive but related substantive components (i.e. self-awareness, relational transparency, balanced processing, and internalized moral), the impact of authentic leadership on employees’ organizational commitment (OC), the impact of employees’ OC on their turnover intention (TI), and the indirect effect of authentic leadership on employees’ TI via OC.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tested a sample of 236 students working as employees in hospitality in the USA, with the idea that authentic leadership increases OC which in turn decreases TI. The participants were asked to rate the manager’s leadership style and the frequency of their leadership behavior.

Findings

Results provide support for the positive effect of authentic leadership on OC in the hospitality industry, and suggest that OC mediates reduced TI.

Originality/value

The results of the study suggest a variety of significant theoretical contributions and critical leadership and organizational implications. The effects of authentic leadership were empirically tested on employees’ OC and the effects of that OC on TI.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Brian Beal

Many organizations hold the traditional view that due to the potential of higher job dissatisfaction and employee turnover rates, hiring overqualified job candidates is…

Abstract

Purpose

Many organizations hold the traditional view that due to the potential of higher job dissatisfaction and employee turnover rates, hiring overqualified job candidates is risky. The purpose of this paper is to take an alternative perspective, using human capital and resource-based theories to propose that hiring overqualified job candidates adds to a firm’s human capital depth. This additional human capital depth, in turn, enables firms to improve near-term organizational effectiveness and, ultimately, build long-term competitive advantage. Thus, the conceptual framework makes reference to deployment of the overqualified as an under-used source of human capital.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews theory and proposes a conceptual framework for reimaging overqualified human resources.

Findings

There are powerful benefits to hiring overqualified job candidates; however, by not hiring overqualified job candidates, organizations are missing out on a large, easily available, and potentially lower cost source of highly skilled human capital.

Originality/value

This paper uses human capital and resource-based theory to propose a conceptual framework which makes four key contributions. First, the authors propose that hiring overqualified job candidates increases an organization’s human capital depth. Next, this increased human capital leads to near-term improvements in employee performance and organizational effectiveness. In turn, firms using career development exercises such as job crafting, mentoring, and/or informal leadership to retain overqualified human capital are more likely to convert near-term organizational effectiveness into long-term competitive advantage.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Brian Beal

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on developments in Norwegian companies’ active ageing policies, and hence offer insight into what characterizes those Norwegian…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on developments in Norwegian companies’ active ageing policies, and hence offer insight into what characterizes those Norwegian companies offering measures to retain their older workers.

Design/methodology/approach

The research questions are investigated using data from two surveys carried out among a representative sample of Norwegian companies in 2005 and 2010. The two data sets are analyzed both separately and jointly, being merged to obtain a pooled cross-section data set. Both multivariate logistic and linear regression are applied.

Findings

The proportion of companies in Norway offering retention measures, as well as the extensiveness of their retention efforts (the number of different measures offered), has increased considerably from 2005 to 2010. What characterizes these companies however are surprisingly similar in 2005 and 2010. Their retention efforts seem to be part of a holistic approach to active ageing. Offering a number of different retention measures is more common among companies having initiated “measures to facilitate lifelong learning” and “measures to prevent health problems or reduced work capacity”.

Originality/value

The employers’ perspective has received little attention in previous research and the authors are the first to report on developments in Norwegian companies’ retention efforts over time. Knowledge about what characterizes employers offering such measures will be important for future efforts to increase employments rates among older workers, which is an aim for most European countries.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Brian Beal

Frequent absences from work can be highly disruptive, while also potentially indicating problematic working conditions that can lead to increased withdrawal behavior. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Frequent absences from work can be highly disruptive, while also potentially indicating problematic working conditions that can lead to increased withdrawal behavior. The purpose of this paper is to test the predictive capability of an expanded effort-reward imbalance model on employee absenteeism within the context of policing.

Design/methodology/approach

Three separate reward systems are identified by the effort-reward imbalance model. In this study, the authors assessed these individual components for their contribution to officer withdrawal behavior in the form of absenteeism frequency. Data were gathered from officers within a large Australian police agency.

Findings

Findings indicate that there was a strong influence of social rewards, such as social support and recognition in the workplace on officer absenteeism rates. Low workload was associated with a higher frequency of absenteeism, suggesting a potential underloading effect. There were a number of significant interactions providing support for the effort-reward imbalance mechanism and the separation of the reward construct. Security rewards were particularly influential and significantly moderated the relationship between effort and absenteeism.

Originality/value

This paper considers an expanded model of worker strain and contributes a longitudinal assessment of the association between perceived effort and reward systems and worker absenteeism.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Brian Beal

Worksites have been targeted as an important setting for physical activity interventions. A recent emphasis for health promoters is the use of point-of-choice…

Abstract

Purpose

Worksites have been targeted as an important setting for physical activity interventions. A recent emphasis for health promoters is the use of point-of-choice interventions to encourage stair climbing at work. The purpose of this paper is to explore campaigns to increase stair climbing at work.

Design/methodology/approach

Focus groups were structured around three messages and four prompts and sought to explore the motivational power of the resources, identify factors contributing to their effectiveness and provide recommendations to improve and optimize content. Benefits and barriers to stair climbing at work were also explored.

Findings

Health awareness, motivation, social norms and time management influence stair climbing at work. Critically, factors associated with the worksite itself can also bias choice independently of any intervention. Results suggest that messages targeting heart health have the greatest impact on reported propensity to climb the stairs at work. Messages targeting rate of respiration for fitness, however, may have a negative effect, given that most people want to avoid getting out of breath at work.

Originality/value

Qualitative research is essential for developing and refining the design detail of point-of-choice interventions and tailoring their components to address individuals’ needs in different settings, but there is little evidence of this in practice.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Brian Beal

This paper aims to review the demands employees face when communicating through information and communication technologies (ICTs), and relevant interventions are suggested…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the demands employees face when communicating through information and communication technologies (ICTs), and relevant interventions are suggested to provide a set of evidence-based recommendations to help protect work-life balance.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the following demands associated with ICTs: response expectations, constant availability, increased workload and poor communication. The authors draw upon empirical research to highlight outcomes and intervention strategies, before discussing implications for research and practice.

Findings

The paper, which reviews four demands employees face when communicating through ICT (response expectations, constant availability, increased workload and poor communication), finds that there are diverse outcomes associated with each. The outcomes were not inherently negative, as evidence suggests that positive performance outcomes can arise from response expectations and constant availability, although there may be health and wellbeing costs.

Originality/value

Four interrelated demands that employees can face when communicating through technology are integrated and possible interventions are analyzed.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Brian Beal

Considering that Master of Business Administration (MBA) programs have been the focus of many evaluations and much criticism in recent years, the purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

Considering that Master of Business Administration (MBA) programs have been the focus of many evaluations and much criticism in recent years, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the objective and subjective effects on careers experienced by part-time MBA students and graduates.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted an empirical research, involving more than 700 students and graduates of three part-time MBA programs in Brazil.

Findings

The authors found that students and graduates experience more subjective than objective effects of such programs in their careers, and that the subjective effects are primarily related to self-confidence, employability, expansion of business view and ability to “play the game”.

Originality/value

This study makes three contributions to the knowledge of the effects of MBAs. First, it provides insight into students’ perspectives. Second, it increases the knowledge of the subjective effects of MBAs on the careers of students. And third, it focuses on part-time programs in a developing nation rather than on full-time programs in a developed nation such as the USA, as is often the case.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Brian Beal

The purpose of this paper is to understand the role of interaction in the process of leadership. Interaction has been claimed to be a leadership competence in the Royal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the role of interaction in the process of leadership. Interaction has been claimed to be a leadership competence in the Royal Navy. The aim of this research is to define how interaction works within naval teams.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses grounded theory. Following a series of leadership discussions in separate focus groups, discussion topics were coded and subjected to recursive qualitative analysis. The grounded approach is used to synthesize and develop existing leadership theory strands, as well as to extend the trait-process approach to leadership.

Findings

The research discovers the key interaction behaviors of engagement, disengagement and levelling. The findings support recent developments in follower-centric perceptions and in interaction specifically. The authors develop engagement theory by combining it with the less well-researched area of leadership resistance. The authors then re-frame resistance as social levelling, a more comprehensive interaction mechanism.

Originality/value

This research uniquely uses grounded theory to extend current theories (competence-based leadership and trait-process theories of leadership), explaining the complexity of leadership interaction. The research also synthesizes and develops engagement and levelling (resistance to leadership) theories for the first time. As such, the project suggests a full range model of follower response to leadership, including subtle forms of resistance to power. The value of group-level analysis using focus groups is recommended, especially for other collective leader–follower approaches to leadership. The research is of interest to those studying leadership process theories, competencies, leader-follower traditions, engagement and power/resistance research.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Brian Beal

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent of corporate disclosure on human resources (HR) in the annual reports of top-performing Indian companies.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent of corporate disclosure on human resources (HR) in the annual reports of top-performing Indian companies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores the extent to which top 82 companies from India present information about HR in their annual reports. This paper examines the annual reports of each of the top Indian firms listed on the Bombay Stock Exchange, using the “content analysis” method. Statistical tests have been performed to analyze the difference between the HR disclosure score across public and private sectors and disclosure variations among various industrial sectors.

Findings

In-house training programmers has been noticed to be the favorite item of disclosure followed by safety awards/certifications and statements regarding cordial relations with the employees/unions. A majority of the Indian firms have ignored significant HR issues such as employee welfare fund, maternity/paternity leaves, holiday benefits, employee loans, adopting old age homes, etc. Overall, the paper reflects low HR-related disclosures.

Originality/value

This is the first paper on the disclosure of HR by the Indian corporate sector in the CSR domain with a disclosure analysis for a period of nine years. This paper provides new directions for the literature in this area and may promote comparative studies on HR-based studies from different perspectives.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Brian Beal

The paper examines two different approaches adopted in the UK to regulate directors’ remuneration. The aim is to explore the approaches to understand which one better…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper examines two different approaches adopted in the UK to regulate directors’ remuneration. The aim is to explore the approaches to understand which one better regulates directors’ pay and why. It provides an account of the approaches’ evolution, effectiveness and challenges toward the regulation of directors’ remuneration.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews various corporate governance codes, their recommendations on directors’ remuneration, their effectiveness and the challenges of regulating directors’ remuneration. The paper also reviews provisions of the Companies Act 2006.

Findings

The paper finds that corporate governance adopts a better approach to regulating directors’ pay than the Companies Act 2006, because it targets the pay-setting process. However, the existence of gray areas and lack of enforcement procedure poses a challenge to its effectiveness. The Companies Act 2006 is unable to regulate directors’ pay adequately, because it adopts a corrective approach and it considers directors’ remuneration as a management responsibility.

Originality/value

The paper offers an up-to-date assessment of the two approaches to regulating directors’ pay in the UK. It highlights the challenges faced by both approaches and considers which approach could regulate directors pay better and its challenges.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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