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Article
Publication date: 17 January 2020

Brett Parnell, Merlin Stone and Eleni Aravopoulou

This paper aims to explore the problems of managing superprojects and identifies how a different approach to controlling them can reduce the incidence of cost and time…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the problems of managing superprojects and identifies how a different approach to controlling them can reduce the incidence of cost and time overruns and benefit shortfalls.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review accompanied by conceptual analysis.

Findings

Project cost and timing overruns and benefit shortfalls are very frequent in superprojects. These problems can be ascribed partly to the way in which they are planned is not taken into account in designing and implementing control systems, particularly the governance processes and the information they have available.

Practical implications

This paper has serious implications for those designing control processes, governance and information management for superprojects. It suggests that if a new approach is taken, fewer superprojects will suffer from cost overruns and benefit shortfalls because remedial actions will be taken earlier for projects, which are experiencing problems, while learning will be fed back to those planning new projects.

Social implications

There will be saving of public money and reduced deferment of benefits that normally result from failed or delayed projects and reduced allocation of large incremental budgets dedicated to resolving problems.

Originality/value

The taxonomy of different types of superprojects is original, as is the idea of ambidextrous control, and the diagnosis of failure reasons lying in the nature of control and governance processes, and the lack of relevant information available during the control process.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2019

Merlin Stone, Neil Woodcock, Yuksel Ekinci, Eleni Aravopoulou and Brett David Parnell

This paper aims to review the development of thinking about the information needed by companies to create an accurate picture of how well they manage their engagement with…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the development of thinking about the information needed by companies to create an accurate picture of how well they manage their engagement with customers, taking into account the evolution of thinking and practice in this area over the past three decades towards the idea of data-driven customer engagement. It then describes the evolution and use of an assessment and benchmarking process and tool which provide the needed information.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review, conceptual analysis and explanation of the management consulting process are used.

Findings

Companies can get an accurate picture of how well they manage customer engagement provided that a careful assessment approach is used where assessors are properly selected and trained and that there is a strong focus on compliance with requirements rather than “box-ticking” based upon managers’ perceptions.

Research limitations/implications

The assessment and benchmarking process was developed mainly for use by larger companies, though the findings could be adapted for use by smaller companies.

Practical implications

Companies whose success depends upon customer engagement should consider using the assessment and benchmarking tool to guide their planning and implementation. They should heed the warnings about the risks of inaccurate assessments which may arise because of the incentives by which managers are managed.

Social implications

The assessment and benchmarking process has been used by the public sector and government, and given government’s desire to engage citizens better, they should consider adopting the ideas in this paper to reform citizen engagement.

Originality/value

This is the only paper which reviews the development of the assessment process for customer engagement.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2018

Merlin Stone, Eleni Aravopoulou, Geraint Evans, Esra Aldhaen and Brett David Parnell

This paper reviews the literature on information mismanagement and constructs a typology of misinformation that can be applied to analyse project planning and strategic…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper reviews the literature on information mismanagement and constructs a typology of misinformation that can be applied to analyse project planning and strategic planning processes to reduce the chances of failure that results from information mismanagement. This paper aims to summarize the research on information mismanagement and provide guidance to managers concerning how to minimize the negative consequences of information mismanagement and to academics concerning how to research and analyse case studies that might involve information mismanagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review accompanied by conceptual analysis.

Findings

Information mismanagement is widespread in organizations, so all those involved in managing and researching them need to be far more aware of the damage that can be done by it.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on the Western society (Europe and North America). The same research should be carried out in other parts of the world. Also, all the case studies could usefully be investigated in more depth to apply the taxonomy.

Practical implications

Managers should be much more aware of their own and others’ tendencies to mismanage information to their own benefit.

Social implications

Stakeholders in public sector activities, including citizens, should be much more aware of the tendency of the government and the public sector to mismanage information to justify particular policy approaches and to disguise failure.

Originality/value

The taxonomy on information mismanagement is original, as is its application to project planning and strategic decision-making.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2018

Brett Parnell, Merlin Stone and Eleni Aravopoulou

The purpose of this study is to explore the information leaders keep their organisations competitive by determining if their business model is under threat and/or needs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the information leaders keep their organisations competitive by determining if their business model is under threat and/or needs changing and whether business model innovation is needed.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a grounded theory approach to probe an area which has been so far researched very little.

Findings

The paper identifies that while quality of management information affects leaders’ decisions about whether their business model is under threat or needs changing, leaders may or may not choose to use it.

Research limitations/implications

The research was carried out with large firms in six sectors in the UK. Research in other sectors, in smaller firms and in other countries, should be carried out to test generalisability.

Practical implications

Although many large firms have made very large investments into areas such as customer insight in the past few years, there may be resistance to using this information even if it indicates that a firm’s current business model is under threat, because of straightforward denial or because of the inertia associated with factors such as difficulties in changing business models or the extent to which the firm’s financial situation is based upon exploiting its current business model, no matter how much that model is under threat from firms with other business models. Therefore, in strategic reviews, firms should factor in these risks and seek to mitigate them.

Social implications

In public sector organisations, these risks of denial or inertia may be stronger because of conservatism and lack of willingness to take the risks of change, so public sector decision makers need to be particularly aware of these risks and seek to mitigate them.

Originality/value

The theoretical contribution of this research is to add to business model and strategic management literature by explaining the role that information plays in business model choice and how its role depends on whether and how the information is used by senior management.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 23 December 2020

Merlin Stone, Eleni Aravopoulou, Ryan Stott, Brett David Parnell, Jon Machtynger, Bryan Foss and Liz Machtynger

The purpose of this paper is to show how the business model of the information and communications technology (ICT) industry has evolved and the general differences that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how the business model of the information and communications technology (ICT) industry has evolved and the general differences that evolution has made to information management.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review was carried out accompanied by conceptual analysis.

Findings

It shows that changes in the business model of the ICT industry have been quite dramatic and have led to significant changes in the structure of the industry.

Research limitations/implications

This research is based on analysis of the ICT industry. The analysis could be broadened to include other industries. Research into business model change should consider adopting the evolutionary approach taken in this paper.

Practical implications

Managers in the ICT industry should factor the likely evolution of business models in their industry into their planning.

Social implications

Government policymakers considering how to stimulate the development of the ICT industry in their country should be aware of the moving nature of their target.

Originality/value

This is one of the first papers to apply the evolutionary approach to business model change.

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Brett David Parnell, Ryan Stott, Merlin Stone, Eleni Aravopoulou and Lucy Timms

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of analysts in providing information to support business model innovation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of analysts in providing information to support business model innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on initial research by two of the co-authors on business models (Stott et al., 2016), to which is added the experience of members of the team in working in strategic analyst firms or in working closely with clients of business analyst firms and further secondary data.

Findings

The findings of this paper show that analysts could do more to help their clients capture the opportunities and meet the threats of business model innovation, but this may require business leaders and analyst firms to think differently about their mutual relationship, particularly the briefs that clients provide analysts and how analysts aggregate information to provide a clearer picture of business model choices and their likely consequences.

Research limitations/implications

This paper needs confirmation of views by primary empirical research.

Practical implications

This study identifies the need for firms to brief their analysts to provide much enhanced information concerning business model opportunities and threats, and for teachers and researchers in marketing to become more closely acquainted with the business model literature and analyst reports and processes.

Social implications

As the idea of business model change becomes a more acceptable part of the strategic armoury of firms, the understanding of the information requirements to support such change to become more widely understood, and business model change to be consequently more common can be expected. This paper contributes to the understanding of the information requirements involved in such changes.

Originality/value

This study highlights the gap in the discussion of information provision to business leaders concerning business model innovation requirements and threats.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 24 March 2021

Nirit Weiss-Blatt

Abstract

Details

The Techlash and Tech Crisis Communication
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-086-0

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Brett L.M. Levy and Robert W. Marans

The authors led an interdisciplinary team that developed recommendations for building a “culture of environmental sustainability” at the University of Michigan (UM), and…

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4875

Abstract

Purpose

The authors led an interdisciplinary team that developed recommendations for building a “culture of environmental sustainability” at the University of Michigan (UM), and the purpose of this paper is to provide guidance on how other institutions might promote pro‐environmental behaviors on their campuses.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors synthesize research on fostering environmental behavior, analyze how current campus sustainability efforts align with that research, and describe how they developed research‐based recommendations to increase environmental sustainability on the UM campus.

Findings

Analyses of prior research suggest that there are five factors that influence individuals' pro‐environment behaviors: knowledge of issues; knowledge of procedures; social incentives; material incentives; and prompts/reminders. Given these factors, UM should pursue three types of activities to support the development of pro‐environment behaviors: education, engagement, and assessment.

Practical implications

The specific recommendations in this report are for the University of Michigan. However, other institutions interested in fostering a culture of environmental sustainability might benefit from undertaking similar comprehensive assessments of how they could support community members' development of pro‐environment behavior and knowledge.

Originality/value

The paper builds on prior research to offer a new vision for how to develop a culture of environmental sustainability on a large university campus.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2022

Ebina Justin M.A. and Manu Melwin Joy

The three objectives served by this review are to provide readers a limpid insight about the topic performance management (PM), to analyse the latest trends in PM…

Abstract

Purpose

The three objectives served by this review are to provide readers a limpid insight about the topic performance management (PM), to analyse the latest trends in PM literature and to illustrate the theoretical perspectives. It would be fascinating for the practitioners and researchers to see the latest trends in the PM system, which is not yet covered in previous reviews. The study covers the historical and theoretical perspectives of human resource management practices. We also try to unveil some of the theoretical debates and conflicts regarding the topic.

Design/methodology/approach

We reviewed 139 studies on PM published within the last 20 years (2000–2020). The method used here is the integrative review method. The criteria used to determine studies are articles from peer-reviewed journals regarding the PM system published between 2000 and 2020. The initial search for studies was conducted using an extensive journal database, and then an intensive reference-based search was also done. Each selected article was coded, themes were identified, and trends for every 5 years were determined. All the articles were analysed and classified based on the methodology used to identify qualitative and quantitative studies.

Findings

The review concludes that PM literature's emphasis shifted from traditional historical evaluations conducted once or twice a year to forward-looking, feedback-enriched PM systems. By segregating the studies into 5-year periods, we could extract five significant trends that prevailed in the PM literature from 2000 to 2020: reactions to PM system, factors that influence PM system, quality of rating sources, evaluating the PM system and types of the PM system. The review ends with a discussion of practical implications and avenues for future research.

Research limitations/implications

It is equally a limitation and strength of this paper that we conducted a review of 139 articles to cover the whole works in PM literature during the last 20 years. The study could not concentrate on any specific PM theme, such as exploring employee outcomes or organizational outcomes. Likewise, the studies on public sector and non-profit organizations are excluded from this review, which constitutes a significant share of PM literature. Another significant limitation is that the selected articles are classified only based on their methodology; further classification based on different themes and contexts can also be done.

Originality/value

The study is an original review of the PM literature to identify the latest trends in the field.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Nancy Odendaal

The smart city strategies of municipalities in South Africa have been grounded in developmentalism, seeking to harness the power of technology to enable improved…

Abstract

The smart city strategies of municipalities in South Africa have been grounded in developmentalism, seeking to harness the power of technology to enable improved governance. Cities such as Durban and Cape Town have embraced infrastructure-led approaches that seek to use state-mediated broadband “backbone” development to enable last-mile ICT access to marginalized communities. With the advent of big data, the range of actors in the ICT-local government terrain has broadened to include partnerships with IT-multinationals and management consultants to streamline municipal bureaucratic procedures, enable data processing, and contribute to greater efficiency. An important driver is the increasingly urgent need to accelerate the delivery of essential services while also encouraging investment and development through greater efficacy (e.g., in processing development applications). A “dashboard urbanism” is becoming evident that fits well with the system of indicators and performance monitoring that is embedded in the managerial South Africa’s local government system. The danger of an overreliance on these quantitative aspects is that it may perpetuate divides in what is considered to be one of the most unequal cities in the world. Based on exploratory research, this chapter explores strategies used by civil society organizations to challenge the assumptions of “dashboard urbanism” and contribute a more rounded appropriation of big data and a deepened and contextualized urban experience.

Details

The Right to the Smart City
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-140-7

Keywords

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