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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 26 March 2024

Latifa Sebti and Brent C. Elder

In this article, we highlight ways in which disability critical race theory (DisCrit) (Annamma et al., 2013), inclusive education and community-based participatory research (CBPR…

Abstract

Purpose

In this article, we highlight ways in which disability critical race theory (DisCrit) (Annamma et al., 2013), inclusive education and community-based participatory research (CBPR) can be used within professional development schools (PDS) to provide students with disabilities with more access to inclusive classrooms. At a grade 4–6 elementary school, we developed a model of a critical PDS to promote inclusive education and facilitate the transition of students of color with disabilities from self-contained to inclusive classrooms. We conducted semi-structured interviews and used action plan meetings with school administrators, teachers, professionals and students with disabilities and their parents to assess the impact of our critical PDS model. Findings suggest this model had a positive impact on administrators’ and teachers’ critical consciousness, ideological and instructional practices, students of color with disabilities’ social, academic and personal outcomes, as well as a schoolwide culture of inclusion and social justice. This study can inform tailored professional development efforts to improve educators’ inclusive practices.

Design/methodology/approach

We conducted semi-structured interviews and used action plan meetings with school administrators, teachers, professionals and students with disabilities and their parents to assess the impact of our critical PDS model.

Findings

The findings of this study suggest this model had a positive impact on administrators’ and teachers’ critical consciousness, ideological and instructional practices, students of color with disabilities’ social, academic and personal outcomes, as well as a schoolwide culture of inclusion and social justice.

Practical implications

This study can inform tailored professional development efforts aiming to improve educators’ inclusive practices.

Originality/value

We developed a model of a critical PDS to promote inclusive education and facilitate the transition of students of color with disabilities from self-contained to inclusive classrooms.

Details

School-University Partnerships, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-7125

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 June 2023

Michelle L. Damiani and Brent C. Elder

The field of Professional Development Schools (PDS) continues to evolve with promising implications. As part of advancing practice, the National Association for Professional…

Abstract

Purpose

The field of Professional Development Schools (PDS) continues to evolve with promising implications. As part of advancing practice, the National Association for Professional Development Schools has updated its nine essential guiding principles, which now includes an explicit expectation for all PDS partners to advance equity, anti-racism and social justice. This article is a call for critical professional development work which infuses Disability Critical Race Theory (DisCrit) practices into achieving the Nine Essentials.

Design/methodology/approach

In this call-to-action article, the authors argue that it is imperative for the whole of PDS work to establish a priority for inclusive practice that recognizes and responds to all aspects of diversity in education from the outset, including disability. The authors suggest that PDS work must be guided by an intersectional approach that is operationalized to achieve equity in education by dismantling both racism and ableism in education. The authors use an action-based example from our PDS work to exemplify these elements in practice.

Findings

In this article, the authors put forth two arguments that they urge their PDS colleagues to consider. First, the authors call for practices within PDS to give attention to improving student learning in ways that specifically address disability and intersectional considerations related to disability. Second, the authors urge that PDS work must be conceptually and practically inclusive in order to achieve the social justice impact put forth in the comprehensive mission of the Nine Essentials.

Originality/value

There is a growing body of literature around PDS that addresses theory to practice research and best practices in PDS settings. While some recent publications address inclusive PDS practices, the authors were not able to identify any works related to DisCrit in the PDS literature to date.

Details

School-University Partnerships, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-7125

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Ruth Adam

The National Primary Care Development Team (NPDT) is spreading the Unique Care approach to case management across the country, and this article presents a case study of how Brent

Abstract

The National Primary Care Development Team (NPDT) is spreading the Unique Care approach to case management across the country, and this article presents a case study of how Brent is successfully implementing Unique Care through the Care Co‐ordination Service. It aims to outline key steps in the development of the service, moving from the initial vision, to pilot phase and on to mainstreaming of the service. The collaborative methodology was adopted. The evidence suggests impressive reductions in service use, alongside an increase in quality of life and improved perception of health and social care services among older people who have had contact with the team.

Book part
Publication date: 8 March 2017

Brent Harger and Melissa Quintela

Gatekeepers play an important role in research conducted with children and youth. Although qualitative researchers frequently discuss institutional and individual gatekeepers…

Abstract

Gatekeepers play an important role in research conducted with children and youth. Although qualitative researchers frequently discuss institutional and individual gatekeepers, such as schools and parents, little attention has been paid to the role that Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) play in determining who is allowed to research particular populations and the ramifications of these decisions for findings involving children and youth. In order to examine this role, we compare negotiations of two researchers working on separate projects with similar populations with the IRB of a large Midwestern university. In both cases, it is likely that board members used their own personal experience and expertise in making assumptions about the race, social class, and gender of the researchers and their participants. The fact that these experiences are supported by findings across a wide range of IRBs highlights the extent to which qualitative research with children is changed (or even prevented) by those with little knowledge of typical qualitative methodologies and the cultural contexts in which research takes place. While those such as principals, teachers, and parents who are traditionally recognized as gatekeepers control access to specific locations, their denial of access only requires researchers to seek other research sites. IRBs, in contrast, control whether researchers are able to conduct research at any site. Although they wield considerably more control over research studies than typical gatekeepers, the fact that they are housed in the institutions at which academic researchers work also means that we can play a role in their improvement.

Details

Researching Children and Youth: Methodological Issues, Strategies, and Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-098-1

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 27 November 2018

Edward Brent

The chapter will review significant changes in information technology (IT) affecting research over the 30-year history of Communication, Information Technology, and Media…

Abstract

The chapter will review significant changes in information technology (IT) affecting research over the 30-year history of Communication, Information Technology, and Media Sociology. It compares broad overviews of computers and the social sciences published shortly after the beginning of the section (1989 and 1990) with a contemporary overview of online research methods from 2017. It also draws on my own experiences from 1981 to the present as both an academic and a software entrepreneur. The author will discuss how changes in the section parallel developments in social science computing over this period, identifying some of the significant ways IT has transformed both the methods of research and the substantive foci of research. Finally, the author extrapolates into the future to consider how continuing changes in the Internet, big data, artificial intelligence, and natural language understanding may change how sociological research is conducted in the foreseeable future.

Details

Networks, Hacking, and Media – CITA MS@30: Now and Then and Tomorrow
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-666-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Christopher Conway

The value of mentoring is gaining a growing appreciation among managers today. Despite scepticism in some quarters that the mentoring relationship if ‘just a chemical thing’ or…

Abstract

The value of mentoring is gaining a growing appreciation among managers today. Despite scepticism in some quarters that the mentoring relationship if ‘just a chemical thing’ or people just ‘clicking’, there is an accepted view that mentoring is a valuable tool of management and organisation development and that the relationship can be replicated to the benefit of all concerned.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 14 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2009

Michael Dennis

Suicide is a tragic cause of death and causes considerable distress for families, carers and healthcare professionals. Thankfully, suicide rates in older people in the UK have…

Abstract

Suicide is a tragic cause of death and causes considerable distress for families, carers and healthcare professionals. Thankfully, suicide rates in older people in the UK have steadily declined for both men and women since the mid‐1980s. An understanding of the clinical and demographic characteristics of both completed suicide and non‐fatal self‐harm in older people is important in informing the development of preventative strategies to sustain this decline. Non‐fatal self‐harm in older people is relatively uncommon compared with younger age groups, but research indicates that self‐harm among older people is frequently a failed attempt at suicide. Thus, the important factors associated with self‐harm in this age group are similar to those linked with completed suicide, particularly high rates of clinical depression, poor physical health and social isolation. Unfortunately, there is also a high rate of subsequent completed suicide. For this reason, self‐harm in later life needs to be taken very seriously and a careful assessment of risk and need by a specialist in older people's mental health should be conducted. The identification and appropriate management of older people with depression in the community and general hospitals is a key area for the prevention of self‐harm and suicide in this age group and requires further attention, particularly with targeted support programmes for those at high risk.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 24 June 2024

Noel Scott, Brent Moyle, Ana Cláudia Campos, Liubov Skavronskaya and Biqiang Liu

Abstract

Details

Cognitive Psychology and Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-579-0

Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Clementine Femiola and Mary Tilki

The purpose of this paper is to describe a community-based peer support project in the London borough of Brent, led by people living with dementia for people living with dementia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a community-based peer support project in the London borough of Brent, led by people living with dementia for people living with dementia.

Design/methodology/approach

The Brent Dementia Peer Support Project is a collaboration between a social movement Community Action on Dementia Brent, Brent CCG, Brent Council, third-sector organisations and faith communities.

Findings

Stakeholder workshops, ethnographic research highlighted the need to support people living with dementia, especially by people who understand that experience. The findings also demonstrated the abilities and skills retained by people living with dementia, their wish to help others to contribute and to remain connected with their communities.

Research limitations/implications

This is an account of one pilot project in a London borough, but is broadly applicable elsewhere. Further research is needed into the values and practicalities of peer support by and for people living with dementia.

Practical implications

People with dementia and their carers lack accessible information and empathetic support to cope with the condition and live independently. This can be offered through dementia peer support services.

Social implications

There are growing numbers of people living with dementia who are motivated to share their knowledge, skills and experiences to improve the lives of other people with dementia.

Originality/value

This paper describes how people with dementia can be enabled to design, inform and deliver support to other people with the condition.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

David Truswell and Richard Bryant‐Jefferies

This article summarises what the Department of Health's (2005) Delivering Race Equality (DRE) agenda in mental health services set out to achieve and the background to this. The…

Abstract

This article summarises what the Department of Health's (2005) Delivering Race Equality (DRE) agenda in mental health services set out to achieve and the background to this. The article then provides commentary on the Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust's experiences while acting as one of the 18 focused implementation sites (FIS) created as part of the Department of Health's five‐year Delivering Race Equality Action Plan and highlights the recommendations that developed out of this work and have national application.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

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