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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Jeremy Lee Williams and Brendan Pearson

The Hungarian wine industry is in a state of transition. Old methods and practices are being abandoned and new techniques are arriving from the West. Tokaj, one of the…

Abstract

The Hungarian wine industry is in a state of transition. Old methods and practices are being abandoned and new techniques are arriving from the West. Tokaj, one of the world's oldest and most famous sweet wine‐producing regions, is at the cutting edge of such developments. Examines the obstacles to be overcome in making a successful transition to the new marketing realities, surveying the approaches and progress made in Tokaj. Argues that there are three integral steps required in the formation of a competitive industry: reorganization of ownership; viticultural and oenological modernization; and Western methods of marketing. The impetus for such changes must come not only from within Tokaj, but also from collaboration with Western foreign investors.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Jeffrey T.J. Lamont

Moldova is one of the smallest constituent Republics of the C.I.S., with a population of just 4.3 million inhabitants. In agrifood terms however, Moldova has traditionally…

Abstract

Moldova is one of the smallest constituent Republics of the C.I.S., with a population of just 4.3 million inhabitants. In agrifood terms however, Moldova has traditionally been one of the key “food baskets” for the rest of the former Soviet Union. Nowhere is this more marked than in the production of wine, with Moldova still supplying 20% of the total wine production of the former Soviet Union. In Central and East European terms the Moldovan wine industry is substantial; producing annually as much wine as Hungary and “Czechoslovakia” combined. This paper provides an overview of the Moldovan wine industry, highlighting key production and structural difficulties facing it as it attempts to gain access to hard currency earning markets outside the former Soviet Union. In particular, the problems caused by the recent reversion to the traditional monopoly‐monopsony structure within the Moldovan wine marketing channel are analysed. Suggestions are made for true liberalisation of the Moldovan wine marketing system, based upon three elements:‐ (i) De‐nationalisation, and a move to new private structures of ownership of Moldovan wineries; (ii) Modernisation of vineyard practices and production methods, driven by private incentive. (iii) The establishment of effective networks of marketing and distribution, based upon private wineries pursuing real markets.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 5 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Jeremy Lee Williams

A new modern style of wine has emerged in Hungary which draws heavily on the wine making and wine marketing success of the so‐ called New World. Examining two very…

Abstract

A new modern style of wine has emerged in Hungary which draws heavily on the wine making and wine marketing success of the so‐ called New World. Examining two very different wine companies, one foreign‐owned, the other indigeneous, this article highlights the success of these initiatives, illustrating how they have boosted Hungarian wine exports and helped create a positive image for Hungarian table wine. Such approaches cannot be followed exclusively, however. Hungary will never be able to export all its production to the west. Attention still needs to be paid to both domestic demand for the old oxidised wine styles as well as demand in the other export markets in the former COMECON countries. This should help to provide a softer landing for an industry struggling with the upheavals of the last three years. The article concludes that Hungary's willingness to experiment and adopt western methods, together with its relative economic and political stability, suggest that the Hungarian wine industry could and should become the centre for innovation in Eastern Europe.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 5 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2020

Máire O Sullivan and Brendan Richardson

This paper aims to highlight the role of consumption communities as a self-help support group to ameliorate loneliness. The authors suggest that the self-help element of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight the role of consumption communities as a self-help support group to ameliorate loneliness. The authors suggest that the self-help element of consumption communities has been overlooked because of a focus on communities pursuing hegemonic masculinity. Instead, the authors focus on a female-led and – dominated consumption community.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal ethnography was undertaken with the aim of understanding consumer behaviour in a “hyper-feminine” environment. Participant observation, depth interviews and netnography were carried out over five years within the Knitting community, focussing on an Irish Stitch ‘n’ Bitch group.

Findings

A dimension of consumption communities has been overlooked in the extant literature; this female-led and -dominated community functions as a self-help support group used as a “treatment” for loneliness. It also demonstrates all the characteristics of a support group.

Research limitations/implications

This study offers a framework with which new studies of community consumption can be examined or existing studies can be re-examined, through rather than cases of loneliness and self-help support groups.

Practical implications

Marketers have an opportunity to build supportive consumption communities that provide a safe space for support where commerce and brand-building can also occur. Groups aimed at ameliorating loneliness may wish to consider integration of the consumption community model.

Originality/value

Calls have been made for a reconceptualisation of consumption communities as current typologies seem inadequate. This paper responds with a critical examination through the lens of the self-help support group, while also taking steps towards resolving the gender imbalance in the consumption community literature. The paper explores loneliness, a previously underexamined motivator for consumption community membership.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Tiffany M. Nyachae, Mary B. McVee and Fenice B. Boyd

Purpose – This chapter discusses youth participation in a Social Justice Literacy Workshop (SJLW). Participants were predominantly Black youth residing in an urban…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter discusses youth participation in a Social Justice Literacy Workshop (SJLW). Participants were predominantly Black youth residing in an urban community with a rich history and important community resources such as libraries and churches. The SJLW used a variety of print texts, videos, artwork, documents, and other texts to explore the topic of police brutality and other justice-related topics.

Design/Methodology/Approach – This chapter uses the gradual release of responsibility (GRR) model as a lens to revisit the SJLW as designed and implemented by the first author Tiffany Nyachae. Nyachae designed and implemented the SJLW as space to inspire students to engage in critical thinking and analysis of authentic texts, and to use these textual interactions as an impetus for activism in their community. With the help of her co-authors, Nyachae reflects on the SJLW through a GRR lens to describe how students were scaffolded and supported as they moved toward activism.

Findings – Students brought their own understandings of police brutality and awareness of activism to the SJLW. These prior understandings were shaped both by their own lived experiences but also by their awareness of and interaction with social media. During the SJLW, youth read and discussed the novels All American Boys by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely (2015) and Hush by Jacqueline Woodson (2002). The youth engaged in activities and discussions about how prevalent issues in each novel connected to larger social and political concerns. Students discussed the current events, engaged in reflective writing, read short pieces, and analyzed documents and videos. The SJLW was successful in such a way that all students felt comfortable voicing their opinions, even when opinions differed from their peers. Students demonstrated critical thinking about issues related to justice. All students completed an action plan to address injustice in their community. While applying the GRR to this context and reflecting, first author Nyachae began to consider the other scaffolds for youth that could have been included, particularly one youth, JaQuan, who was skeptical about what his community had done to support him. Nyachae revisits the SJLW to consider how the GRR helped to reveal the need for additional scaffolding that JaQuan or other youth may have needed from leaders in the SJLW. A literature review also revealed that very few literacy practices have brought together the GRR and social justice teaching or learning.

Research Limitations/Implications – This chapter demonstrates that the GRR framework can be effectively applied to a justice-centered teaching and learning context as a reflective tool. Since very little research exists on using the GRR framework with justice-centered teaching, there is a need for additional research in this area as the GRR model offers many affordances for researchers and teachers. There is also a need for literacy researchers to consider elements of justice even when applying the GRR framework to any classroom or out-of-school context with children and youth.

Practical Implications – The GRR can be a useful tool for reflecting the practices of literacy and justice-centered teaching. Just as the GRR can be a useful framework to help teachers think about teaching reading comprehension, it can be an effective tool to help teachers think about supporting students to grow from awareness to activism in justice-centered teaching and learning.

Originality/Value of Paper – This chapter is one of only a handful of published works that brings together a social justice perspective with the GRR.

Details

The Gradual Release of Responsibility in Literacy Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-447-7

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2020

Brendan Chapman, David Keatley, Giles Oatley, John Coumbaros and Garth Maker

Cold case review teams and the processes that they adopt in their endeavour to solve historic crimes are varied and largely underreported. Of the limited literature…

Abstract

Purpose

Cold case review teams and the processes that they adopt in their endeavour to solve historic crimes are varied and largely underreported. Of the limited literature surrounding the topic of cold case reviews, the focus is on clearance rates and the selection of cases for review. While multiple reports and reviews have been undertaken and recommend that the interface between investigators and forensic scientists be improved, there is little evidence of cold case teams comprised of a mixture of investigators and scientists or experts. With the growing reliance on forensic science as an aide to solvability, the authors propose that the inclusion of forensic scientists to the central cold case investigation may be a critical factor in future success. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

To support the proposed approach, the authors conducted a review of the current literature seeking insight into the reported make-up of cold case teams. In conjunction with this, the authors reviewed a number of commissioned reports intended to improve cold case reviews and forensic services.

Findings

While many of the reviewed reports and recommendations suggested better integration with scientists and external expertise, little evidence of this in practice was reported within published literature. Open dialogue and cross pollination between police investigators and forensic scientists are likely to mitigate biases, inform case file triage and better equip investigations with contemporary and cutting-edge scientific solutions to the evidence analysis for cold cases. Furthermore, with respect to scientists within academia, large pools of resources by way of student interns or researchers may be available to assist resource-sparse policing jurisdictions.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first peer-reviewed recommendation for the consideration of integrated forensic scientists within a cold case review team. Multiple reports suggest the need for closer ties, but it is the anecdotal experience of the authors that the benefits of a blended task force approach may yield greater success.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Book part
Publication date: 9 December 2016

Abstract

Details

Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-068-8

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Book part
Publication date: 9 December 2016

Abstract

Details

Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-068-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

David Biggs, Brendan Burchell and Mike Millmore

Temporary workers have many human resource and labour market implications. These consequences are further influenced with the introduction of new legislation relating to…

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Abstract

Purpose

Temporary workers have many human resource and labour market implications. These consequences are further influenced with the introduction of new legislation relating to temporary workers. The purpose of this article is to present research on the impacts of the legislation – Fixed Term Employees Regulations and Conduct of Employment Agencies and Employment Businesses Regulations – on temporary workers in the labour force.

Design/methodology/approach

Information from 24 Labour Force Surveys, conducted between December 1997 and November 2003, were analysed with two longitudinal Labour Force Surveys. Qualitative data was also gathered from six temporary worker employers and 17 agency workers.

Findings

Analysis of data demonstrated that the utilisation of temporary workers had declined in the labour force: Temporary workers had decreased in real terms by 24 per cent and agency workers who were less regulated by only 11 per cent. Also, an increased take‐up of permanent work by temporary workers was found post‐legislation (27 per cent) compared with pre‐legislation (22 per cent).

Research limitations/implications

Some limitations exist in the study using National Statistics and qualitative data to analyse labour force dynamics. Further research is warranted in this area investigating how strategic decisions in utilising temporary workers are formed and how recent legislation has influenced these policies.

Practical implications

Changes in temporary worker legislation have direct consequences to the labour force.

Originality/value

The paper reveals the decline of temporary workers in the labour force between 1997 and 2003 and examines specific legislation, which may have influenced this phenomenon.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Sandra A. Waddock and Brendan D. Bannister

Using the competing values model of organisational effectiveness,and a set of variables derived from the inter‐organisational relationsliterature, it is attempted to…

Abstract

Using the competing values model of organisational effectiveness, and a set of variables derived from the inter‐organisational relations literature, it is attempted to establish the correlates of overall effectiveness and partner satisfaction in social partnerships. Correlational analysis demonstrates that the competing values model variables and all of those derived from the interorganisational literature are highly intercorrelated, indicating that all measure some aspect of effectiveness. Multiple regression analysis indicates that the competing values are associated with overall effectiveness, while competing values and balanced partner relations (a process variable) are positively associated with partner satisfaction. Implications are discussed.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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