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Article

Damien McManus and Brendan Loughridge

Based on the results of a small‐scale pilot interview‐based survey of senior information professionals working in the academic community in the UK, this paper reviews some…

Abstract

Based on the results of a small‐scale pilot interview‐based survey of senior information professionals working in the academic community in the UK, this paper reviews some of the reasons why knowledge management is apparently so unpopular in universities. Those interviewed were a Pro‐Vice‐Chancellor and Librarian (Communications and Information Technology), a Director of Information Strategy and University Librarian, a Director of Information Services and University Librarian, two University Librarians, an Information Strategies Co‐ordinator at a major public funding body in higher education, and the Head of Information Services at a multinational law firm. Corporate culture and organisational structure are found to be major factors affecting perceptions of the relevance of knowledge management programmes and projects.

Details

New Library World, vol. 103 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

Brendan Loughridge

This paper reviews some recent professional and academic publications on aspects of the theory and practice of knowledge management, with particular reference to the…

Abstract

This paper reviews some recent professional and academic publications on aspects of the theory and practice of knowledge management, with particular reference to the curriculum of professional education for library and information management and the career roles and prospects of information professionals. Some commentators dismiss knowledge management as a fad; others view it as a major paradigm shift in the management and exploitation of “intellectual capital”. It is concluded that many aspects of knowledge management practice bear a close resemblance to well‐established practices in librarianship and information management. However, the emphasis by knowledge management theorists and practitioners on the importance of knowledge elicitation and knowledge creation, groupwork and team work, greater involvement in organisational strategy development and support and IT may require greater attention to the personality, motivation and career aspirations of potential entrants to the profession in order to prepare them better for wider‐ranging, multi‐role careers.

Details

New Library World, vol. 100 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Abstract

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Library Management, vol. 20 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Abstract

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Library Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article

Melanie T. Benson and Peter Willett

The purpose of this paper is to describe the historical development of library and information science (LIS) teaching and research in the University of Sheffield's…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the historical development of library and information science (LIS) teaching and research in the University of Sheffield's Information School since its founding in 1963.

Design/methodology/approach

The history is based on published materials, unpublished school records, and semi-structured interviews with 19 current or ex-members of staff.

Findings

The School has grown steadily over its first half-century, extending the range of its teaching from conventional programmes in librarianship and information science to include cognate programmes in areas such as health informatics, information systems and multi-lingual information management.

Originality/value

There are very few published accounts of the history of LIS departments.

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Article

Mike Heery

The background leading up to the estblishment of a library and information (LIS) school by a consortium of university libraries in the Bristol area is described. Course…

Abstract

The background leading up to the estblishment of a library and information (LIS) school by a consortium of university libraries in the Bristol area is described. Course development and structure are examined. Practical consequences of the course and issues arising from the school’s establishment and operation are discussed within a broader professional context. These include the use of practitioners as lecturers and implications for research; and developments in the professional curriculum including the place of generic skills and specialisms.

Details

Library Review, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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