Search results

1 – 5 of 5
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2020

Brendan Bartram

Taken at face value, it may initially seem difficult to argue with the sentiments enshrined in the rhetoric that surrounds the TEF – raising the status of teaching in…

Abstract

Taken at face value, it may initially seem difficult to argue with the sentiments enshrined in the rhetoric that surrounds the TEF – raising the status of teaching in Higher Education (HE), rebalancing its relationship with research, incentivising institutions to focus on the quality of teaching and making them more accountable for ‘how well they ensure excellent outcomes for their students in terms of graduate-level employment or further study’ (OfS, 2018, p. 1). Clearly, these are laudable aspirations that will chime with anyone who believes in the importance of students experiencing an education that enriches and transforms them and their potential. Drawing on Fraser and Lamble's (2014/2015) use of queer theory in relation to pedagogy, however, this chapter aims to expose the TEF not just ‘as a landmark initiative that is designed to further embed a neoliberal audit and monitoring culture into Higher Education’ (Rudd, 2017, p. 59) but as a constraining exercise that restrains diversity and limits potential. Although queer theory is more usually linked with gender and sexuality studies, Fraser and Lamble show us that it can be used ‘in its broader political project of questioning norms, opening desires and creating possibilities’ (p. 64). In this way, the queer theoretical lens used here helps us to question, disrupt and contest the essentialising hegemonic logics behind the nature and purposes of the TEF and its effects in HE classrooms. Using the slantwise position of the homosexual (Foucault, 1996), this queer analysis of the TEF can thus be helpful as a politically generative exercise in opening up space for new possibilities.

Details

Challenging the Teaching Excellence Framework
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-536-8

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2020

Abstract

Details

Challenging the Teaching Excellence Framework
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-536-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Gitika Sablok, Pauline Stanton, Timothy Bartram, John Burgess and Brendan Boyle

The purpose of this paper is to examine the HRD practices of multinational enterprises (MNEs) operating in Australia to understand the value that MNEs place on investment…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the HRD practices of multinational enterprises (MNEs) operating in Australia to understand the value that MNEs place on investment in their human capital, particularly managerial talent.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on a representative sample of 211 MNEs operating in Australia, this paper investigates the extent (using frequencies) and determinants (using logistic regression analysis) of training and development expenditure, management development strategies, talent management and succession planning policies.

Findings

The findings suggest that less than 20 per cent of MNEs operating in Australia are investing over 4 per cent of their annual pay bill on training and development. Furthermore, almost a quarter of firms invest less than 1 per cent in training and development. However, most MNEs invest in their managers and those with high potential through the use of management development programmes, talent management strategies and succession planning. Interestingly, in comparison to US MNEs, Australian MNEs were less likely to use management development or talent management programmes for senior management or high performing staff.

Research limitations/implications

The current study is cross-sectional and represents a snapshot of MNEs’ HRD practices at one point in time. The study measured the perceptions of the most senior HR manager and did not include the views of other organisational participants. The authors suggest the need for future research studies that incorporate longitudinal research designs and the views of different organisational actors.

Practical implications

HR managers or HRD specialists need to develop a strong understanding of the Australian institutional context, as well as demonstrate the importance/business case for an integrative approach to HRD.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to study the HRD practices of MNEs operating in Australia, particularly focusing on the value that MNEs place on their human capital.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 59 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Ashish Malik, Brendan Boyle and Rebecca Mitchell

The purpose of this paper is to examine innovation in the resource-constrained context of India’s healthcare industry. It is argued that the process of innovation in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine innovation in the resource-constrained context of India’s healthcare industry. It is argued that the process of innovation in addressing healthcare management challenges in such a context occurs through organisational ambidexterity and that human resource management (HRM) plays an important role.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research methodology is applied to explore the role of HR practices in facilitating contextual ambidexterity and subsequent innovations in healthcare in India. The unit of analysis is the “case” of healthcare providers in India and in-depth interview and documentary data in two case sites are analysed to reveal the role of HRM in facilitating contextual ambidexterity and innovation. Data analysis was undertaken first at a within-case and then at a cross-case analysis level using interpretive manual coding based on how the data explained the role of HRM in delivering innovative outcomes and supporting organisational ambidexterity.

Findings

The authors found evidence of the use of sets of high-involvement HRM practices for exploration of new ideas and efficiency-driven HRM practices for creating contextual ambidexterity in the case organisations. Further, managerial/leadership style was found to play an important role in creating cultures of trust, openness, risk-taking and employee empowerment, supported by an appropriate mix of intrinsic and extrinsic rewards. Finally, training was also reported as being central to creating an ambidextrous context for delivering on various innovations in these healthcare providers.

Originality/value

This study represents an exploration of innovation in the context of India’s healthcare sector through intersecting literatures of ambidexterity, innovation and HRM practices. In light of the emerging economy research context, an important empirical contribution is palpable. Moreover, through a study design which included collecting data from multiple informants on the role of human resources in facilitating innovative outcomes, the authors reveal the role of HR-related initiatives, beyond formal HR practices in creating contextual ambidexterity. This study also reveals the degree to which contextual idiosyncrasies enhance our understanding of the role of HR in facilitating innovation in emerging economies.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 July 2020

Kumar Biswas, Brendan Boyle and Sneh Bhardwaj

Using the theoretical lens of the behavioural perspective on HRM, this study examined a mediated model to understand the extent to which organisational factors such as…

Abstract

Purpose

Using the theoretical lens of the behavioural perspective on HRM, this study examined a mediated model to understand the extent to which organisational factors such as supportive human resource management policies and practices (SHRPP) and organisational climate (OC) can influence the affective attitudes of HR managers towards promoting women into organisational leadership roles. Survey data collected from 182 human resource managers in Bangladesh were analysed using partial least squares–based structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) and the PROCESS macro to test mediating effects. The results reveal that the adoption of SHRPP is positively associated with OC, which in turn shapes the attitudes of HR managers leading to implementing unbiased promotional practices for organisational leadership roles.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative survey data collected from 182 human resource managers in Bangladesh were analysed using PLS-SEM and PROCESS macro.

Findings

The results reveal that the adoption of SHRPP is positively associated with OC which in turn shapes the attitudes of HR managers leading to implementing unbiased promotional practices for organisational leadership roles.

Research limitations/implications

Self-report, cross-sectional survey data may contribute to the methodological bias such as common method bias (CMB). Harman's single-factor test revealed that no single component explained a major portion of the total variance. Furthermore, partial correlational analysis using a marker variable coupled with an assessment of social desirability indicates that common method variance is unlikely to have any CMB risks to the validity of the study results.

Practical implications

From a practical point of view, the findings of this study suggest that supportive HR practices may create a positive organisational climate that leads to creating a healthy work environment ensuring an equal opportunity for everyone to grow and excel irrespective of their socio-cultural backgrounds and gender identity; thus, facilitating the organisation to take advantage of creativity and innovation offered by their talents, a critical factor for the organisation to survive and flourish in the dynamic market.

Social implications

The study findings provide insights into why organisations should adopt fair and transparent HR policies to create a congenial work climate impacting on positive social attitudes towards acceptance of a gender-balanced empowered society.

Originality/value

To the best of author's knowledge, this is the first study that examined a mediated model to understand how organisational factors such as SHRPP and OC can impact on the affective attitudes of HR managers towards promoting women in the organisational leadership roles.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

1 – 5 of 5