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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Michelle A. Morganosky and Brenda J. Cude

In this paper we analyze consumer demand for and acceptance of online food retailing using longitudinal data collected in three studies (1998, 1999, and 2001). Information…

6238

Abstract

In this paper we analyze consumer demand for and acceptance of online food retailing using longitudinal data collected in three studies (1998, 1999, and 2001). Information reported is from online food shoppers in ten US markets. Comparisons of results from each of the three studies is presented and change patterns identified. We conclude by recommending that researchers shift their attention toward addressing some of the more troublesome supply side issues of the online food retailing equation.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 30 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Michelle A. Morganosky and Brenda J. Cude

Reports a preliminary assessment of consumer response to and demand for online food retail channels. Data were collected from 243 US consumers who currently buy their groceries…

33917

Abstract

Reports a preliminary assessment of consumer response to and demand for online food retail channels. Data were collected from 243 US consumers who currently buy their groceries online. The majority of online users were younger than 55 years of age, female, and reported annual incomes of $70,000 or more. Over 70 percent reported convenience and saving time as their primary reasons for buying groceries online but 15 percent cited physical or constraint issues that made it difficult for them to shop at grocery stores. Of the respondents, 19 percent bought all of their groceries online. Also reports demographic and online shopping variables that are significantly related to the primary reason for shopping online, willingness to buy all grocery items online, perception of time spent shopping online vs in the store, and experience with online grocery shopping.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2021

Lini Zhang, Haidong Zhao and Brenda Cude

This study, which is based on the extended hierarchy of effects (HOE) model, aims to examine whether social media interactions with one or more luxury brands can affect consumers'…

2114

Abstract

Purpose

This study, which is based on the extended hierarchy of effects (HOE) model, aims to examine whether social media interactions with one or more luxury brands can affect consumers' knowledge of, affection for and purchases of as well as loyalty to luxury fashion brands as a category.

Design/methodology/approach

SoJump (a leading data collection company in China) launched an online survey to collect data from Chinese luxury fashion brand consumers. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was conducted to analyze data from the random sample of 308 Chinese luxury fashion brand consumers.

Findings

The findings of this study demonstrated that social media interaction had direct positive influences on three stages of the luxury fashion brand decision-making process – knowledge, affection and loyalty – but not purchases. The results also empirically confirmed that consumers' response to social media interaction follows the cognition-affect-conation sequential process presented in the HOE model.

Practical implications

This study not only provides a new perspective for researchers to investigate the impacts of interactive social media marketing on purchase decision-making in the luxury fashion brand category but also underpins the importance of building interactive alliances for luxury brands to increase consumers' knowledge of, affection for, purchases in and loyalty to the luxury fashion brand category.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to investigate whether social media interactions with luxury fashion brands as a category influence consumers' knowledge of, affection for and loyalty to that category. In addition, this study is the first attempt to explore whether social media interactions can directly influence consumers' luxury fashion brand purchases.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Marvin D. Troutt

This paper calls attention to the profound differences between personal inventory decision making and the corresponding decision making of business organizations. It is argued…

Abstract

This paper calls attention to the profound differences between personal inventory decision making and the corresponding decision making of business organizations. It is argued first that the motivations and criteria being used by consumers are vastly different from the assumptions of models such as the well known EOQ (Economic Order Quantity) model. Next the implications for marketing are discussed. A research agenda is then proposed for filling in some of what is currently unknown.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 March 2023

Doriana Cucinelli and Maria Gaia Soana

Are financially illiterate individuals all the same? This study aims to answer this question. Specifically, the authors investigate whether people answering incorrectly and “do…

2815

Abstract

Purpose

Are financially illiterate individuals all the same? This study aims to answer this question. Specifically, the authors investigate whether people answering incorrectly and “do not know” to the big five questions about financial knowledge (FK), all identified by previous literature as financially illiterate, are two sides of the same coin, or rather individuals with different socio-economic and demographic characteristics, and whether this leads to different levels of risk of falling victim to financial fraud.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a large and representative sample of Italian adults, the authors run both ordered probit and probit regressions to test the determinants of financially illiterate individuals, distinguishing between those answering FK questions incorrectly and those answering “do not know”. The authors also measure the probability of falling victim to financial fraud for the two groups. To check the robustness of our results, the authors run a multinomial regression, a structural equation model and an instrumental variable regression model.

Findings

The authors demonstrate that the socio-demographic and socio-economic characteristics of individuals selecting incorrect responses to FK questions are different from those of individuals selecting the “do not know” option. Moreover, the results show that the former are more likely to be victims of financial frauds.

Practical implications

The “one-size-fits-all” approach is not suitable for financial education. It is important to consider socio-demographic and socio-economic characteristics of individuals in order to identify specific targets of education programmes aiming to reduce insecurity and excessive self-confidence as well as to increase objective FK. The study’s findings also identify vulnerable groups to which financial fraud prevention schemes should be targeted.

Originality/value

To date, financial illiteracy has been measured as the sum of incorrect and “do not know” responses given to FK questions. This approach does not allow to observe the socio-demographic and socio-economic differences between people choosing the “do not know” option and those answering incorrectly. The paper aims to overcome this limit by investigating the socio-demographic and socio-economic characteristics of individuals selecting “do not know” and incorrect responses, respectively. The authors also investigate whether the two groups have different probabilities of being victims of financial fraud.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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