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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Branka Badovinac and Primož Južnič

This paper seeks to deal with the “image problem” in the library and information science (LIS) profession from the cultural studies viewpoint. It aims to explore…

1984

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to deal with the “image problem” in the library and information science (LIS) profession from the cultural studies viewpoint. It aims to explore representations of LIS in LIS itself and to research the representation practices of LIS in the social and cultural environment.

Design/methodology/approach

After identifying some main features of professional discourse on the LIS image, the empirical part of the research particularly explored two questions: how LIS is constituted and how it is embedded in broader social practices. More than 300 articles were collected from the Slovenian daily newspaper with the largest circulation. The sample was analyzed quantitatively and two‐fold qualitatively.

Findings

The results of quantitative analysis outline the formation of LIS's community nature. The results of qualitative analysis mostly show the signifying practices in differentiating between the “old” and the “modern” and representing practices in creating “zealous” librarians and “suspicious” users. The results also point to librarians as “organic intellectuals”.

Research limitations/implications

The study is exploratory and at this point the thesis on “organic intellectuals” cannot be confirmed; in addition to the limits in the analysis methods, the theoretical background needs to be further explored. The findings cannot be generalized due to social and cultural differences.

Practical implications

The methodology can be applied to other research subjects. The results may be helpful for library managers and library public relations work.

Originality/value

There are only a few studies of such theoretical and methodological design that have researched the role of the LIS in society. The paper also analyzes the “image problem” in the daily newspapers.

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Primoz Juznic and Branka Badovinac

The paper seeks to present an analysis of the development of schools of librarianship and information science (LIS) in the European Union (EU) applicant states until 2004…

1619

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to present an analysis of the development of schools of librarianship and information science (LIS) in the European Union (EU) applicant states until 2004. It discusses the potential and actual changes in their organisation, notably their curriculum.

Design/methodology/approach

The comparative analysis of LIS programmes was performed. The model presented by T.D. Wilson in 2001 was selected as the model for analysing the data. The aim was to support the Wilson model with some empirical data from the specific countries.

Findings

The results show that the long history of traditional library education in these schools was not a great obstacle to adapting the curriculum to new professional and political standards. LIS schools have generally changed their curriculum towards those of modern LIS schools and have also embraced the EU outlines regarding higher education, especially the Bologna Declaration.

Research limitations/implications

This study has its limitations as it is based only on the formal courses’ names and the formal content. Comparative analysis could also be accomplished through analysing courses' content, students and teaching staff.

Originality/value

The theoretical model of LIS courses analysis was tested on the LIS programmes in EU new member and applicant states. Testing the model shows its weaknesses and strengths. This could be developed in a simple but practical and useful tool for LIS programmes comparison and harmonisation, where necessary.

Details

New Library World, vol. 106 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2012

Anna Maria Tammaro

Purpose – The general aim of the chapter is to assess the impact of the Bologna Process (BP) on Library and Information Science (LIS) education in Europe, investigating…

Abstract

Purpose – The general aim of the chapter is to assess the impact of the Bologna Process (BP) on Library and Information Science (LIS) education in Europe, investigating the curriculum content, the different concepts and values of LIS institutions, the learning and teaching definition and the learning outcomes orientation, with student-centred learning considered the first objective to be achieved.

Design/methodology/approach – The past and recent debate inside European Association for Library and Information Education and Research (EUCLID), European Bureau of Library, Information and Documentation Associations (EBLIDA), International Federation Library Associations (IFLA) studies and conferences are used together with relevant literature to describe the ongoing debate.

Findings – The main problem of LIS education in Europe is that there are different concepts of LIS and that the internationalisation of LIS education lends itself to various interpretations. The quality criteria of the contents of the LIS curricula evidenced here are the research orientation and, in particular, the qualities (and competencies) that you expect graduates of the programme to possess. The first tenet of LIS education in a European course is that it should have a student-centred approach. Pedagogy should be based on a constructivist approach and students should be encouraged to engage in a research project of some kind, so that they are more critical consumers of research.

Research limitations/implications (if applicable) – In the discussions inside the EUCLID project European Curriculum Reflections (Kajberg & Lorring, 2005), there was no common understanding of the LIS professional role. It is suggested that further research is needed towards Europeisation of LIS curriculum.

Social implications (if applicable) – Possible benefits of the Bologna Process for quality enhancement of LIS education, which can also be described as problematic areas, are the stimulus of the politicians which push a constructive dialogue between stakeholders.

Originality/value – Ambiguities are not lacking for the learning outcomes approach as a whole. The paper tries to evidence what the learning outcomes subject to evaluation are, and hence how they can be measured.

Details

Library and Information Science Trends and Research: Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-714-7

Keywords

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